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mistake on show aired 21/10/16 in Scotland

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MarieMcEwan
1209570.  Sat Oct 22, 2016 1:55 pm Reply with quote

Hi there...
I was wondering if anyone else noticed the mistake Sandi Toksvig made on the show the other night regarding the the correct meaning of a Scottish phrase..

The phrase in question was
"Stoor Sucker"...

She is quoted as describing this as a "stair cleaner"

As a Scot I can say with 100% certainty that "stoor" in Scotland is "dust"

Therefore a "stoor sucker" is a "dust sucker"
better known as a hoover.

As a REALLY long term fan of this show and of course the lovely Sandi Toksvig I hope this in no way offends anyone connected to the show but I got really excited at the idea of finding something I knew in the show.

It was my mastermind moment or even when I get 2 or more questions correct in a row on 15 to 1!

Thank you for your time and have a spectacular day!

 
Jenny
1209732.  Mon Oct 24, 2016 6:37 am Reply with quote

Hi Marie and welcome to the forums - look around and see if there are any other conversations you'd like to join in :-)

We've had quite a few people from Scotland writing to us about this so I guess we must have got it wrong!

 
CB27
1209770.  Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:44 pm Reply with quote

MarieMcEwan wrote:
Therefore a "stoor sucker" is a "dust sucker"
better known as a hoover.

Though that klaxon for Sandi has to be met with another klaxon, because most hoovers may be "stoor suckers", but most "stoor suckers" are probably not hoovers :)

 
CharliesDragon
1209825.  Tue Oct 25, 2016 1:34 am Reply with quote

The Norwegian for vacuum cleaner, støvsuger, directly translates to dust sucker... How are we still influencing the language in the north of Britain?

All right, it's probably just a coincidence.

 
14-11-2014
1209830.  Tue Oct 25, 2016 2:12 am Reply with quote

Quote:
The Norwegian for vacuum cleaner, støvsuger, directly translates to dust sucker... How are we still influencing the language in the north of Britain?

All right, it's probably just a coincidence.

It's probably the Nilfisk C1, a Danish støvsuger. In Dutch it's a stofzuiger too. In German it's a Staubsauger.

designforeurope.eu wrote:
Nilfisk was founded in 1906, achieving their breakthrough in 1910 with the launch of the Nilfisk C1 vacuum cleaner. The C1 vacuum weighed a mere 17.5kg and could be operated by just one person – a real step forward at a time when most machines required four people to work them.

 
CharliesDragon
1210205.  Fri Oct 28, 2016 1:04 pm Reply with quote

Hmm, and here I thought Nilfisk was a newer brand, since the vacuumer we had when I was growing up was of a different brand, but now they seem to sell a lot of Nilfisks.

Nilfisk also made motorbikes in its earlier days, the Nimbus. They don't seem to have made it to model number 2000, though...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimbus_%28motorcycle%29

 
Efros
1210220.  Sat Oct 29, 2016 4:02 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
MarieMcEwan wrote:
Therefore a "stoor sucker" is a "dust sucker"
better known as a hoover.

Though that klaxon for Sandi has to be met with another klaxon, because most hoovers may be "stoor suckers", but most "stoor suckers" are probably not hoovers :)


Probably not but in Scotland the generic name for all vacuum cleaners is hoover, whether they be of that brand or not. Here in the US it is just vacuum, hoover is almost unknown as a vacuum cleaner brand.

 
suze
1210232.  Sat Oct 29, 2016 5:50 am Reply with quote

Hoover certainly was the generic name used for any vacuum cleaner throughout Britain, but it is any more?

At one time, Hoover was far and away the leading brand of vacuum cleaner used in Britain, but those days are gone. If vacuum cleaners had been unknown here until a grumpy fellow from Wiltshire started making them in the 90s, then the generic name for them would undoubtedly be Dyson.

Do the young people still actually use the word Hoover generically? I realize that I should be better placed than most to answer that, but I cannot say that vacuum cleaners come up in class all that often. Perhaps one of the actual young people hereabouts could tell us.

 
Alexander Howard
1210509.  Tue Nov 01, 2016 5:09 am Reply with quote

CharliesDragon wrote:
The Norwegian for vacuum cleaner, støvsuger, directly translates to dust sucker... How are we still influencing the language in the north of Britain?

All right, it's probably just a coincidence.


I suspect that 'stoor sucker' is neo-Scots, invented just so that the Scots language can be said to be a living tongue. In Northern Ireland there is a 'Boord o' Ulsteir Scots' dedicated to ensuring that all public information can be provided in Ulster Scots, and it has to make these neologisms up all the time. It is a beautiful tongue and worth preserving, but I don't know if it has a phrase for 'tendentious neologistic clowning'.

 

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