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Origami

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Mugglewump
1207965.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 1:58 pm Reply with quote

Has origami saved your life? As well as being a popular hobby, it turns out that origami has serious scientific applications, and is particularly useful for creating things that need to expand from a compact state, like airbags and arterial stents.

Origami folding techniques have allowed scientists to create computer simulations of airbags, enabling them to study important variables such as deployment speed and force of impact at various points, without having to crash too many actual cars.

Similarly, scientists at Oxford used origami techniques to create an arterial stent that can be folded down to just 12mm to enable insertion into the artery, then expanded to 23mm once inside, opening up the artery to facilitate blood flow.

http://www.langorigami.com/article/airbag-folding
http://www.laweekly.com/arts/know-how-to-fold-em-how-origami-changed-science-from-heart-stents-to-airbags-2372322

 
GreatBigBadger
1287339.  Tue Jun 19, 2018 3:57 am Reply with quote

Would like to know where you got the idea that Origami only started with the advent of coloured paper. To say it began in Germany is nuts. I was an active member of the British Origami Society in the early 70s and coloured paper was rarely used and rather frowned on. You'll still find many purists fold in white paper by choice. And there was plenty of uncut origami in Japan well before the nineteeth century. The crane fold, for example, goes back to at least the early seventeen hundreds.

If you want to be QIzzical, China would be a much more believable answer.

 
crissdee
1287392.  Tue Jun 19, 2018 1:17 pm Reply with quote

Would like to know where you got the idea that he/she/anybody claimed anything about coloured paper.

 
brunel
1287393.  Tue Jun 19, 2018 1:48 pm Reply with quote

GreatBigBadger wrote:
Would like to know where you got the idea that Origami only started with the advent of coloured paper. To say it began in Germany is nuts. I was an active member of the British Origami Society in the early 70s and coloured paper was rarely used and rather frowned on. You'll still find many purists fold in white paper by choice. And there was plenty of uncut origami in Japan well before the nineteeth century. The crane fold, for example, goes back to at least the early seventeen hundreds.

If you want to be QIzzical, China would be a much more believable answer.

Well, if you look at the list of citations in the Wikipedia article on Origami, there is a text entitled "History of Origami in the East and West before Interfusion" by Koshiro Hatori.

He asserts that, rather than people in Europe being influenced by Japan, the art of folding paper to create models is one that arose independently in Japan and Europe over the centuries, and that most of the more common patterns that are now associated with "Japanese origami" were first recorded in European textbooks.

He also notes that, whilst it was not unknown for figures to be created by folding paper alone, it was also quite common for the paper to be cut during preparation (as documented in Japanese texts from the 18th century) and for the final model to then be painted once complete.

In his concluding remarks, he then asserts that the modern style of origami that is recognised by most figures today is the form which was reimported into Japan in the 1860's and 1870's as the Japanese introduced Western styles of education.

In particular, he notes that the style of origami that was practised and recorded in Germany is the style that is most similar to that practised by a modern audience and that most of the more common folded pieces are first recorded in Germany in the 1830's and are absent from contemporary Japanese texts, with those models only appearing in Japan after the 1870's.

 
GreatBigBadger
1287401.  Tue Jun 19, 2018 3:43 pm Reply with quote

Well, Hatori may say that, but then he also says origami was well-established in Japan by the 1700s (https://www.origami-resource-center.com/history-of-origami.html), some 150 years before this European 'introduction'. While it seems quite possible different folds and folding techniques were being developed in parallel and independently in Japan and Europe, the depiction of traditional folds in the ranma on the same page of that link show clearly that it was practised in Japan well before the 1860s.

 
brunel
1287639.  Fri Jun 22, 2018 3:51 pm Reply with quote

GreatBigBadger wrote:
Well, Hatori may say that, but then he also says origami was well-established in Japan by the 1700s (https://www.origami-resource-center.com/history-of-origami.html), some 150 years before this European 'introduction'. While it seems quite possible different folds and folding techniques were being developed in parallel and independently in Japan and Europe, the depiction of traditional folds in the ranma on the same page of that link show clearly that it was practised in Japan well before the 1860s.

Whilst there are indeed arguments that there were certain traditional folds that were present in Japan in that era, what he was arguing is that a number of folds which are claimed to be "traditional" were absent in Japan at that period.

It's not that he's saying that there weren't individuals who were crafting items from folded paper at the time and that some particular patterns that were present then are still practised now, but that the predominant form of the craft that was present in Japan before the 1860's was sufficiently distinct from the form that we recognise now that what we now recognise as origami more closely follows the way in which the art form developed in Germany prior to that date instead of that which was prevalent in Japan before that era.

 
bobwilson
1359957.  Wed Oct 07, 2020 8:15 am Reply with quote

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThwuT3_AG6w

 
Challenger007
1362330.  Thu Oct 29, 2020 8:08 am Reply with quote

Origami is also a source of stress relief. And origami is also a source of useful ideas in life. We often underestimate handmade, but it plays a big role in our life. For some, a hobby is a way not to go crazy, while for others it is a source of creative ideas for the main occupation. All unusual ideas are next to us - the main thing is to notice them in time!

 
PDR
1362438.  Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:24 pm Reply with quote

I tried to set up an on-line origami business, but it folded.

PDR

 
Jenny
1362445.  Thu Oct 29, 2020 1:58 pm Reply with quote

Ba-dum tish!

 
CB27
1362489.  Fri Oct 30, 2020 5:43 am Reply with quote

I'm creasing up with laughter...

 
PDR
1362507.  Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:45 am Reply with quote

The paper holds their folded faces to the floor...

PDR

 

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