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PDR
1207957.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 12:50 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
PDR wrote:
Yes, those are very good points. But as we're talking about BACON this is an argument you just won't win.
Splitting hairs, as we often do here, bacon doesn't come from 3-6 month old pigs as they're not big enough.


Again, very good points. But as we're killing pigs for food to get the bacon there's no real argument that says we can't also kill them for roast pork with crackling. That would be discriminatory.

PDR

 
Spud McLaren
1207959.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 1:05 pm Reply with quote

Oh, so it's roast pork and crackling now? Shifting the goalposts again ...

 
barbados
1207963.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 1:42 pm Reply with quote

Generally speaking suckling is not the most economic way to buy pig, the age of the pig is immaterial to the age at which they are slaughtered - with the emphasis more on weight.
Agreed, that the off the shelf pork is quite young - they are also at sexual maturity so to consider them "babies" is emotive as suggested.

 
Spud McLaren
1207964.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 1:49 pm Reply with quote

barbados wrote:
Generally speaking suckling is not the most economic way to buy pig, the age of the pig is immaterial to the age at which they are slaughtered - with the emphasis more on weight.
Not having eaten flesh for over 35 years, I can't say whether suckling pig is common or not - whether it's economic or not is not directly germane to the issue. However, since
you wrote:
we also don't generally eat baby pig
I was seeking to illustrate that it is available for those who want to buy it.

 
barbados
1207969.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 2:31 pm Reply with quote

True it is available, but a suckling pig will cost you as much as a full hog so pound for pound it's very expensive.

So as I said, generally we would not eat baby pig.

 
14-11-2014
1207976.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 3:29 pm Reply with quote

As stated earlier, eating piglets (< 20 kg) and young pigs (< 50 kg) is unusual in
the EU. The average careers of pigs, ~90 kg is ~4-6 months old:

 
Spud McLaren
1207978.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 3:43 pm Reply with quote

You'd either have to put that info into context or interpret it for me, 14. It gives numbers, but do they represent numbers slaughtered, numbers existing, numbers moved - what? Also it doesn't say over what time or area range the sample/census was taken.

 
Zziggy
1207979.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 3:47 pm Reply with quote

Yes - I was going to say something about how "Young pigs" is actually the largest figure there, even if you consider all three values of "fattening and cull pigs" as a single figure, but there's just not enough information (that is to say, any at all) to say anything about that diagram.

 
14-11-2014
1207980.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 3:49 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
generally we would not eat baby pig.

It still will be hard to buy the alledged corpse, including all organs.

 
Spud McLaren
1207981.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 3:57 pm Reply with quote

Zziggy wrote:
Yes - I was going to say something about how "Young pigs" is actually the largest figure there, even if you consider all three values of "fattening and cull pigs" as a single figure, but there's just not enough information (that is to say, any at all) to say anything about that diagram.
Hmm, well, the three categories of fattening and cull pigs, added together, is 0.01 mio short of the young pigs total. I think that's coincidental. If it isn't, where did the difference go between young pigs and piglets?

What does it all mean?

 
Spud McLaren
1207982.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:01 pm Reply with quote

I think I've sussed how the figures could work, but there are too many unexpressed variables to be sure exactly what's meant to be illustrated.

 
Zziggy
1207984.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:04 pm Reply with quote

Well done. That is simply far more effort than I am willing to expend.

 
barbados
1207986.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:10 pm Reply with quote

I think, and this is only a thought
The piglets are immature so would include the suckling stock - not often sold.
The young pigs are the ones that return to breeding stock - again not often sold. This would be because lb for these would be too expensive as they provide a better source of income to the farmer.
The fattening pigs are the ones that are the ones that you will see on the butchers shelves, as they have produced their offspring - who are now in the "young pig" category. They are also young enough to produce tender meat.

 
crissdee
1207988.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:22 pm Reply with quote

Calling them "baby pigs" is emotive, calling them "piglets" is pragmatic.

Calling them "corpses" is emotive, calling them carcasses is pragmatic.

 
Spud McLaren
1207989.  Sat Oct 08, 2016 4:23 pm Reply with quote

I'm pretty sure that most of the butchered animals have never produced offspring. The breeding sows are usually kept in farrow almost continuously, producing several litters each per year.

 

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