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Oldest Person

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Where else should we claim David Kennison was present?
The Sea of Tranquility - 1969
0%
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The Grassy Knoll - 1963
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Noel's House Party - 1997
100%
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Total Votes : 1

Flanners86
1203454.  Wed Aug 31, 2016 11:22 am Reply with quote

A man who would have held this record was David Kennison, a revolutionary soldier who was present at the Boston Tea Party, the battle of Bunker Hill, the surrender at Yorktown and was also a scout for George Washington. He died at the ripe old age of 115 on 24th February 1852 and was accorded a burial with a full military parade in Chicago's New Survey City Cemetery.




The only problem was that no part of his story was true.


He was prolific in his claims throughout his lifetime and was believed to such an extent that the first reliable refutation of his story was made in 1914 as found by Pamela Bannos http://hiddentruths.northwestern.edu/kennison/dispute.html


Quote:
The first systematic breakdown I found that challenged the Kennison legacy, was a paper that was read at The Borrowed Time Club, in Oak Park, Illinois, on July 30, 1914. This presentation of the paper by Dr. Charles Josiah Lewis, the vice president of the club, was reported on in the town's newspaper, Oak Leaves, on August 1, 1914:
Strange Case of David Kennison – Dr. Lewis Tells of Remarkable Chicagoan – Lincoln Park Stone
...
For the entertainment of the club Dr. Charles J. Lewis read a paper on “David Kennison, Last Survivor of the Boston Tea Party.”


The extent of his fabrication is borne out in his ever-changing date of birth, as mentioned by Dr Lewis

Quote:
It is true that after 1812 Kennison gave his age in 1814 as 42 years; that in 1818 he said he was 56, while in 1820 he claimed he was 79. Startling conclusions would emanate from these dates and they would have necessitated his being born at three different dates, 1772, 1762, and 1741, respectively. He also said, when making the statement that he was 79 in 1820, that he had a family of young children aged, respectively, 17, 14, 11, 7 and 5.


Actually, he was about 7 years old at the time of the tea party, saw no Revolutionary War service, and was about 85 years old not 115 when he died.

A paper published in 1973 by Albert G Overton states that

Quote:

"Apparently no one ever questioned his ability to attend the surrender in Yorktown, while at the same time he was a captive of the Indians in upper New York State.


Being able to maintain the story throughout his life and even beyond his own death is a fairly impressive feat! He received the aforementioned parade, a plum burial site at the expense of Chicago City Hall, and a memorial stone in Lincoln Park stating his many and varied achievements.

In Albert Overton's words

Quote:
"Muffled drums beat a slow marching pace, for this magnificent parade was a funeral cortege to honor a well known Revolutionary War hero. Actually, they were escorting the mortal remains of one of the most colorful imposters ever to take the City of Chicago."





I'd like to credit Pamela Bannos for her research and the good people of the Boston Tea Party museum and ships for putting me on to this story. However they lose some points for not breaking olde-worlde character during questioning!

 
gruff5
1205475.  Wed Sep 21, 2016 12:32 am Reply with quote

I was the world's youngest person once - didn't last long, though.

Fact.

 
Ian Dunn
1234237.  Sat Apr 15, 2017 2:09 pm Reply with quote

The woman who was officially recognised as the oldest person in the world has just died. Emma Morano of Italy, died aged 117. She was born on 29th November 1899 - meaning that there is officially no-one left alive in the world who was born in the 19th century.

Source: BBC

 
Alexander Howard
1234440.  Mon Apr 17, 2017 8:01 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
The woman who was officially recognised as the oldest person in the world has just died. Emma Morano of Italy, died aged 117. She was born on 29th November 1899 - meaning that there is officially no-one left alive in the world who was born in the 19th century.

Source: BBC


The 19th century ended on 31 December 1900, so there is a narrow possibility of finding someone of that century still.

(The "long nineteenth century" ended on 4 August 1914. That is a historians' conceit though.)[/i]

 
Ian Dunn
1234459.  Mon Apr 17, 2017 12:02 pm Reply with quote

Alexander Howard wrote:
The 19th century ended on 31 December 1900, so there is a narrow possibility of finding someone of that century still.

(The "long nineteenth century" ended on 4 August 1914. That is a historians' conceit though.)


First, I did say that she was the oldest "officially" recognised person, so yes there is the possibility that someone might have also been born whose age cannot be verified.

Second, surely the 19th century ended on 1st January 1900?

 
suze
1234462.  Mon Apr 17, 2017 12:19 pm Reply with quote

No.

There was no year 0, so the first century AD ended on 31 December 100 - one hundred years after it began.

I know the world celebrated the Millennium at the end of 1999, but that was strictly speaking one year early.

All the same, I suspect that those media reports were based on the lady who died the other day being the last surviving person whose year of birth started with 18.

 

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