View previous topic | View next topic

Orange

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

PDR
1245890.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:17 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Didn't Stephen Fry once tell us that there was a master at his school called Gorringe?


Was it a master? I thought Gorringes was the name of his school uniform tailor? In the same episode Rich Hall advised that in the cannon of Montana poetic verse "orange" could be rhymed with "door hinge".

But I can't remember which episode it was - we need to consult the forum archivist. Can someone switch on the Stawberry seachlight signal?

PDR

 
Strawberry
1245894.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:46 am Reply with quote

PDR: Here are 2 post links for you. *

Post 188568

Post 46044

* Post 188568, includes a link to post 8919 but there's no point in looking at post 8919 because you just get an Error 404.

Edit: Also, here's a link to include post 8919 because the thing of links needing to include old. didn't occur to me until suze mentioned it.

Post 8919


Last edited by Strawberry on Sun Aug 20, 2017 3:34 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
suze
1245896.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:56 am Reply with quote

A lot of links from old posts to even older posts no longer work. That's because of the addition of the world "old" to the URL a few years back, but a link which you make now knows that it needs to be there.

post 8919


Gorringe was indeed the tailor, and the episode in which he was mentioned gave rise to expressions such as "Cummerbund for Geography". Shame on me for having forgotten that!

 
PDR
1245897.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:58 am Reply with quote

Ah yes, and some wonderful camping up from Mr Jupitus together with some remarks from Mr Bailey IINM.

Them were t'days!

PDR

 
PDR
1245898.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:59 am Reply with quote

Strawberry wrote:
PDR: Here are 2 post links for you. *



A thousand thanks, oh caped curator!

The city is safe and you may return to the archive cave for a well earned rest!

PDR

 
Alfred E Neuman
1245902.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:08 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
But in any case, there is sporange. It's not a word in everyday use and fungusologists more often use the Latin sporangium from which it derives, but in effect it is a fungus's scrotum. That is to say, it's a little sack wherein a fungus makes the spores which it uses to reproduce itself.


Sounds like quite a nice insult - you scrotum of a fungus you!

 
charliemic
1245909.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:57 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
A lot of links from old posts to even older posts no longer work. That's because of the addition of the world "old" to the URL a few years back, but a link which you make now knows that it needs to be there.


There would definitely be a mechanism to work around that... if you know the date 'old' was added, you could do some string amendment in the URLs... it would rely on the javascript having some cursory access to your databse though. I digress, but was getting quite excited by how you could manage and structure loosely connected information.

 
charliemic
1245910.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 9:59 am Reply with quote

I assume the pronunciation of orange hasn't stayed consistent as well, so perhaps it's easier on other accents?

 
Bondee
1245933.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 1:54 pm Reply with quote

Have we all forgotten about The Foxhunter's final resting place?

suze wrote:
But in any case, there is sporange. It's not a word in everyday use and fungusologists more often use the Latin sporangium from which it derives, but in effect it is a fungus's scrotum. That is to say, it's a little sack wherein a fungus makes the spores which it uses to reproduce itself.


Is that also the source of sporran?

 
suze
1245949.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 4:13 pm Reply with quote

It could so easily have been, but no.

Sporangium is actually pretend Latin, and was invented around 1800 from spore (a spore, which is a Greek word) and angeion (another Greek word, meaning a container). Quite why it was then felt necessary to invent an English form of sporangium I don't really know, but there are a handful of citations for sporange.

Sporran is an Anglicized spelling of Scottish Gaelic sporan and Irish sboran, meaning a purse. Those words derive from Latin bursa, again a purse. (From which we also get words like bursar, a person who looks after the money, and bourse, the French word for a stock exchange).

But now for the nice coincidence. Although sporangium does not share an etymology with bourse, they do have comparable meanings. While la bourse is the French stock exchange, the plural form les bourses means the scrotum. (In this sense, les bourses is a plurale tantum and has no singular, just as pants in English has no singular.)

 
Bondee
1246041.  Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:52 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
(In this sense, les bourses is a plurale tantum and has no singular, just as pants in English has no singular.)


I remember listening to an episode of The Carl Donnelly & Chris Martin Comedy Podcast in which the subject of underwear raised its ugly head for discussion. Carl Donnelly mentioned that "I prefer a looser* fitting pant." Is that a correct usage of the singular?

*He may have said "...a tighter fitting pant." I can't remember, but the point is the same.

 
suze
1246050.  Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:35 pm Reply with quote

It's fine in comedy, but would anyone use it for real?

For sure, there are grey areas here. Trousers is usually considered a plurale tantum, except that a certain kind of tailor will say "Yes Modom, this is a very fine trouser".

Would the same kind of tailor in New York refer to "a very fine pant"? I don't know the answer to that, although a woman's suit including trousers is a pant suit rather than a pants suit.

I sometimes refer to a garment as a clothe, and I don't suppose I'm the only person who does. But you won't find any dictionary which allows this; they all want clothes to be a plurale tantum.


Occasionally a word which has been a plurale tantum ceases to be so. It's not a clothe that I wear, but if I wore an underskirt I would call this a petticoat. My grandmother would have referred to her petticoats, even though she wasn't wearing two of them.

For an example the other way, scissors. The singular of scissors is in fact scissors, and "a scissors" is a form which is to be found in older writing but would seem strange today. crissdee would be able to quote chapter and verse, but Sherlock Holmes once says something like "You will perceive that the string has been cut with a scissors". I think it's in the one about the ears.

 
crissdee
1246055.  Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:56 pm Reply with quote

It is indeed "the one about the ears", more properly "The Adventure of the Cardboard Box"*. The actual quote being;

"You have also, no doubt, remarked that Miss Cushing has cut the cord with a scissors....."**


*the box being that which contained the aforementioned ears.

** I would like to say that I recalled that quote off the top of my head, but that would be an untruth. I have the Penguin set within arm's reach as I type.

 
suze
1246062.  Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:27 pm Reply with quote

I have the Wordsworth single volume edition (last of the big spenders, me!) frustratingly not quite within arm's reach.

I'd have had to get up and walk at least three paces, so you saved me a job!

 
crissdee
1246087.  Sat Aug 19, 2017 3:34 am Reply with quote

I also have the Baring-Gould Annotated editions to hand.

And six other Holmes-related books.

And "The Mystery of Cloomber".

And "The Narrative of John Smith" (ACD's unfinished work)

And four books about Dr Watson's adventures in WW1

And my E-reader with most of his ouevre on it.


Other than that, almost nothing.........

 

Page 2 of 3
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group