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Orange

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14-11-2014
1202911.  Sat Aug 27, 2016 9:59 am Reply with quote

Gerbrandy (to Churchill: Mr. Sherry-Brandy, a WWII Dutch PM) wrote:
I hate you welcome in this town where all the Oranges are buried

Ik heet u welkom in ... is polite, and the oranges refer to their Royal Family.

 
'yorz
1202918.  Sat Aug 27, 2016 12:11 pm Reply with quote

And people are supposed to make sense of that?

 
Alfred E Neuman
1202925.  Sat Aug 27, 2016 3:18 pm Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
And people are supposed to make sense of that?


Nope, that's never been a priority.

 
Alexander Howard
1203173.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 4:10 am Reply with quote

William of Orange might have struggled with his English too at first. When he landed in Brixham in Devon (on 5 November 1688) to overthrow his father in law (and uncle), he is reported to have said "I have come for your goods - all of your goods!"

 
PDR
1203209.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 6:58 am Reply with quote

Ah, but he probably marched to the fife and drum because (as we know) oranges are not the only flutes.

PDR

 
Jenny
1203249.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 10:32 am Reply with quote

Groooaaaannn! <silently hands PDR his coat>

 
PDR
1203257.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 10:42 am Reply with quote

Which is actually even funnier when you consider the next few lines of the poem I alluded to:

...For I have no coat to put on.
So up she went to her grandfather's chest
And she got him a coat of the very, very best
And the soldier put it on.


PLEASE tell me that was intentional, Jenny!

PDR

 
Jenny
1203262.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 10:49 am Reply with quote

Sadly not, but it should have been.

 
Spud McLaren
1203287.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 12:21 pm Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
Which is actually even funnier when you consider the next few lines of the poem I alluded to
I thought it was a folk song. No, let's be assertive here - it IS a folk song. Does that prevent it from being a poem? I think so, but I'd have to have notice of the question as to why.

 
PDR
1203288.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 12:32 pm Reply with quote

So bite me!

:0p

PDR

 
Spud McLaren
1203293.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 12:45 pm Reply with quote

Unless you are a vegetable or cheese, you know you're safe ...

 
CharliesDragon
1203331.  Tue Aug 30, 2016 4:56 pm Reply with quote

Alexander Howard wrote:
William of Orange might have struggled with his English too at first. When he landed in Brixham in Devon (on 5 November 1688) to overthrow his father in law (and uncle), he is reported to have said "I have come for your goods - all of your goods!"


All your base is belong to me.

 
charliemic
1245848.  Wed Aug 16, 2017 7:51 pm Reply with quote

I think this may already have been on QI, but the word orange to describe the colour comes from the fruit.

Not relevant in any way, but I came across a vicar called Rev Gorringe. Whoever said orange doesn't rhyme with anything was wrong.

 
gruff5
1245853.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 12:25 am Reply with quote

I don't think rhyming with a proper word (name) counts.

Any other suggestion?

 
suze
1245887.  Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:00 am Reply with quote

Didn't Stephen Fry once tell us that there was a master at his school called Gorringe?

But in any case, there is sporange. It's not a word in everyday use and fungusologists more often use the Latin sporangium from which it derives, but in effect it is a fungus's scrotum. That is to say, it's a little sack wherein a fungus makes the spores which it uses to reproduce itself.

 

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