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Olympic Games

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14-11-2014
1203372.  Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:25 am Reply with quote

Q: In 2016, the average official distance of the Olympic Marathons was ...

K: 42.195 km
A: Less, (42.195 + 10) : 2 = 26.0975 km

 
14-11-2014
1204289.  Fri Sep 09, 2016 3:36 pm Reply with quote

bbc.co.uk (editied) wrote:
Russian walker Sergey Kirdyapkin will be stripped of his London 2012 gold following a successful IAAF appeal.

Australian Jared Tallent will now be awarded the gold and Irishman Robert Heffernan the bronze.

The IAAF will immediately proceed to the effective disqualification of results, re-rankings and re-allocation of medals in all competitions under its control.

Q: Australia's Jared Tallent will receive ...

K: The gold, nothing, a certificate, a copy.
A: An original gold medal, but not the original gold medal.

 
14-11-2014
1204290.  Fri Sep 09, 2016 3:44 pm Reply with quote

Q: In Rio de Janeiro, the best woman's High Jump result was ...

K: 1.97m.
A: 1.98m, the woman's Heptathlon High Jump.

 
suze
1204306.  Fri Sep 09, 2016 5:23 pm Reply with quote

I think I know this one.

Although the winning height in the women's high jump event was 1.97, two heptathlon competitors recorded 1.98 in the high jump element of the heptathlon. Which is a bit embarrassing for the specialist high jumpers!

Comparably, Jessica Ennis-Hill holds/held the British record for the 100 meters hurdles - having set it in the heptathlon at London 2012 rather than in a hurdles race.

 
14-11-2014
1206733.  Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:45 pm Reply with quote

thelondontriathlon.com wrote:
There are 4 distances available: Super Sprint, Sprint, Olympic and Olympic Plus.

The IOC protects its brands. Nowadays an ITU Olympic distance triathlon is officially a Standard distance triathlon.

Wikipedia (2015 ITU Triathlon World Cup) wrote:
Each World Cup event in the series involves a standard (Olympic) distance triathlon race.

 
Burgess Shale
1206771.  Sat Oct 01, 2016 6:24 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
I don't agree here. Thanks is not praise or reward, it's just courtesy.


It also is a way to show your manners. I always say thank-you to a bus driver because it's not much to ask for, it shows up the less-courteous passengers (fairly often, unfortunately, the elderly), and it also establishes a connection--it never hurts to be polite to those who perform a service you require.

It also gives me a way to express displeasure--if I don't say thank-you to a bus driver, it's because they've seriously p***ed me off, such as pulling away from the stop at high speed before I've had a chance to sit down, causing me to jar my arm (typically done to me, almost never to the bus-pass brigade), or (in the case of one particular driver) driving fast over speed bumps (that, or the bus is filled way too much for my liking).

Phew, a long post for me...

 
'yorz
1206780.  Sat Oct 01, 2016 7:38 am Reply with quote

I can't see a difference between showing courtesy and showing good manners.

 
PDR
1206783.  Sat Oct 01, 2016 8:58 am Reply with quote

One shows good manners to anyone, but one only shows courtesy to one's inferiors.

PDR

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1289551.  Mon Jul 09, 2018 2:46 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:

My initial thought was that no one would have represented more than three different countries under these rules. A person from Saarbrücken could have represented Germany, Saar, West Germany, and then Germany again. A person from Beograd could have represented Serbia, Yugoslavia, Serbia and Montenegro, and then Serbia again.


Don't forget Danzig.

It was part of Germany up until the end of World War One. then it became a Free City of League of Nations protection up until September 1939. Following its invasion that same month it reverted back to Germany and following the end of World War Two it was incorporated into Poland.


So, an athlete hailing from there could have represented four different countries.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1289552.  Mon Jul 09, 2018 3:01 pm Reply with quote

[quote]1. Let us imagine an athlete from the Cook Islands. Those islands became a colony of New Zealand in 1901, and so a Cook Islander taking part in the 1896 or 1900 Olympics would presumably have represented Britain. In 1908 and 1912 she would have represented Australia, because the Australian teams for those two Olympicses included NZers. From 1920 New Zealand entered in its own right, and since 1988 the Cook Islands has entered in its own right.[quote]


An even better example would be an athlete from the Caroline Islands. Up until 1899 he would have competed for Spain. Then, following the Spanish-American War, Spain sold the island-group to the Germans so he would have competed for Germany up until the end of WW1. After the war he would have competed for Japan as the League of Nations awarded the Japanese the mandate. After WW2 he would have competed for the USA as the islands were included in the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands group. Nowadays he competes under the flag of the Federated States of Micronesia, which attained independence from the USA in 1986.


Which makes a total of five countries.


Last edited by duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk on Sat Jun 06, 2020 9:57 am; edited 1 time in total

 
suze
1289567.  Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:21 pm Reply with quote

duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk wrote:
Don't forget Danzig.


Danzig never joined the IOC, and its constitution held that it was to be represented in international affairs by Poland. Accordingly, an athlete from there ought properly to have represented Poland - although the only actual Olympian I can find who hailed from that city was an ethnic German and represented Germany.

The rules weren't as rigid then as they are now, but even if Danzig had taken part in the Olympics in its own right, an athlete could still only have represented Germany, Danzig, and Poland.


Your Caroline Islander competing for Spain, Germany, Japan, United States of America, and Federated States of Micronesia looks like a great call though. It doesn't beat the person from Prishtina who could have represented seven countries (post 1200779 refers), but have some points all the same.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1293838.  Fri Aug 24, 2018 11:11 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk wrote:
Don't forget Danzig.


Danzig never joined the IOC, and its constitution held that it was to be represented in international affairs by Poland. Accordingly, an athlete from there ought properly to have represented Poland - although the only actual Olympian I can find who hailed from that city was an ethnic German and represented Germany.


Your comment about the athlete from Danzig is interesting. Did you know that the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki were the only occasion in which Saarland took part?

They had been disallowed from uniting with Germany after WW2. Even though they were occupied by France they did not want to become French so they formed their own separate football team and a Nationale Olympisches Komitee des Saarlandes.

As so few Saarlanders were interested in winter sports they didn't bother sending a team to the Winter Games in Oslo but they did send a miner's safety helmet in which the flame of the torch relay could be safely carried in aeroplanes.

At the opening ceremony 36 entrants marched ahead of the German team though the team had full complement of 98. None won any medals and the team reached 44th out of 69 teams.

Though theoretically possible, no Saarland team was sent to the 1956 Games as two months earlier the Saarlanders had voted overwhelmingly to accept incorporation into Germany. Thus, at Melbourne, a United States of Germany team took part, consisting for the only time, athletes from all 3 German states. Saarland Olympic Committee dissolved itself the following year, on annexation by Germany.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saar_at_the_1952_Summer_Olympics

 
suze
1293853.  Fri Aug 24, 2018 4:20 pm Reply with quote

duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk wrote:
At the opening ceremony 36 entrants marched ahead of the German team though the team had full complement of 98. None won any medals and the team reached 44th out of 69 teams.


The best performance by a Saar athlete at the 1952 Olympics was a ninth place achieved by a sprint canoeist named Therese Zenz. Frau Zenz was 19, and canoeing in the sea - as the competitors in 1952 did - was a completely new experience for her.

Frau Zenz was to win three silver medals representing Germany in the next two Olympicses, but before those came the 1954 Canoe Sprint World Championships in France. She won her event there, and as far as I can tell she is the only person to have won an international sporting competition representing Saar.

Therese Zenz went on to coach a German pair which took an Olympic gold in 1964, and at the age of 85 she now lives in retirement in the same Saar town where she was born in 1932.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1349962.  Sat Jun 06, 2020 10:00 am Reply with quote

A couple more Olympic facts:

Pankration (a mixture of boxing and wrestling) was the only sport that wasn't reinstated when the Olympics were revived in 1896.

Handball, badminton and table-tennis are the only Olympic sports where the United States has never won medals.

 
suze
1349980.  Sat Jun 06, 2020 11:53 am Reply with quote

duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk wrote:
Pankration (a mixture of boxing and wrestling) was the only sport that wasn't reinstated when the Olympics were revived in 1896.


What about chariot racing?

Olympic chariot racing represented the only chance for women to win medals - well, olive wreaths - because the prize went to the owner of the winning chariot rather than the driver. Only eccentric rich kids were so louche as to drive their own chariots. Otherwise that was usually a job for a slave, although rich folk desperate for olive wreaths sometimes resorted to hiring professional chariot drivers.

 

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