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Olympic Games

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Leith
1202264.  Sun Aug 21, 2016 7:25 pm Reply with quote

swot wrote:
Alfred E Neuman wrote:

Why on earth can't we just grunt and nod?


INORITE!


Urgh...


Yes.
Or preferrably just wave from across the room (eye contact optional) as far as I'm concerned.

Most of my friends and family have nice predictable handshake or greet-and-smile protocols, with exceptions for closest acquaintances only, but there are a few circles in which I appear to be expected to participate in this ghastly kiss-on-the-cheek ritual with relative strangers, with a baffling variety of conventions on number of cheeks involved, reciprocity, and whether awkwardness is more likely to be caused by actual contact or by the lack of it.

All further complicated when the rest of the group are better acquainted with each other than with me.

I'm developing a distinct neurosis about the whole business.

 
'yorz
1202270.  Sun Aug 21, 2016 8:14 pm Reply with quote

Oh dearie me. In that case I may have committed a faux pas when you visited Ivy Cottage.
*cringe*

 
tetsabb
1202273.  Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:00 pm Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
Oh dearie me. In that case I may have committed a faux pas when you visited Ivy Cottage.
*cringe*


My imagination at 3am.......

 
Strawberry
1202313.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 4:41 am Reply with quote

As I've mentioned a couple of times before, I stayed at my maternal aunt's house for three days in late February/ early March. We went to my aunt's friend's house and she had a dog. He was a Labradoodle. I'd never met my aunt's friend before but we had both heard of each other. When my aunt and I left, everyone said Goodbye. My aunt and her friend hugged and then my aunt's friend and I shook hands. It was so British.

 
'yorz
1202331.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 6:20 am Reply with quote

Don't make it worse, tets. What for me is a friendly hug, may well be infringement of space for someone else. I shouldn't assume.

 
Jenny
1202362.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 12:53 pm Reply with quote

I'm like you 'yorz - bit of a hugger, given an excuse. You're right - one shouldn't assume.

 
tetsabb
1202372.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 1:34 pm Reply with quote

As I have got older, hugging has become much more natural to me. I am reminded that it is not quite such the case for many others.

 
crissdee
1202373.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 1:36 pm Reply with quote

Dragging this back from the social minefield that is personal greetings.

In all this unseemly back-slapping about how many medals we won at the tourney, I am drawn to those great lines*

"And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
or the selfish hope of a season's fame.
But a captain's hand on a shoulder smote,
play up, play up, and play the game."


*points for anyone except suze who can identify the poem.

 
Spud McLaren
1202376.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 1:41 pm Reply with quote

That, and

    "If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same"

 
Leith
1202382.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 2:00 pm Reply with quote

'yorz wrote:
Oh dearie me. In that case I may have committed a faux pas when you visited Ivy Cottage.
*cringe*

Only with the Stonehenge comment :P
No, don't worry - by 'relative stranger' I generally mean people I've only briefly met and not really spoken to much.
I'm generally fine with people I consider friends.

 
Spud McLaren
1202383.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 2:03 pm Reply with quote

Leith wrote:
'yorz wrote:
Oh dearie me. In that case I may have committed a faux pas when you visited Ivy Cottage.
*cringe*
Only with the Stonehenge comment :P
Well, I'm intrigued now. Unless it was one of those "you-had-to-be-there" things.

 
suze
1202396.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 5:20 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
*points for anyone except suze who can identify the poem.


Damn. Yes, I can - but since I don't get any points, I'll leave it for someone else.

Some readers may have had to read the War Poets (Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, and so on) for GCSE English. At my school we read those poets in Year 9, and the anthology that we use includes that poem. It doesn't really fit because it's about the Sudan Campaign of the 1880s while the rest of the anthology is about WWI, but I quite often find that some of the girls already know it. (Especially those whose fathers a) went to public school, b) like cricket, which is the subject of the first verse, or c) both.)

 
suze
1202397.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 5:25 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
That, and

    "If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same"


That one pisses me off a bit, although I can't really put a finger on why.

There's a rather odd version of it by Joni Mitchell. Had she been listening to Sting?

 
tetsabb
1202405.  Mon Aug 22, 2016 9:03 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Dragging this back from the social minefield that is personal greetings.

In all this unseemly back-slapping about how many medals we won at the tourney, I am drawn to those great lines*

"And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
or the selfish hope of a season's fame.
But a captain's hand on a shoulder smote,
play up, play up, and play the game."


*points for anyone except suze who can identify the poem.


I cheated and googlerized Sir Henry Newbolt and "Vitaļ Lampada" . Fine stirring stuff, though, of course, symptomatic of that late Victorian belief that beating up brown people round the world was the duty of every upstanding Englishman, and that cricket is a component part of making you upstanding

Where shall we put a Paralympic thread? Monday was the 20th anniversary of me finding The Note from my soon-to-be ex-wife; shortly afterwards I was watching Paralympic action from Atlanta, and consoled myself with the thought that a lot of the people involved had got themselves going again after life-changing events; if they could do amazing stuff, I would give it a crack, too.

 
PDR
1202416.  Tue Aug 23, 2016 4:44 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Dragging this back from the social minefield that is personal greetings.

In all this unseemly back-slapping about how many medals we won at the tourney, I am drawn to those great lines*

"And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
or the selfish hope of a season's fame.
But a captain's hand on a shoulder smote,
play up, play up, and play the game."



Whilst I get what you're saying, and agree that playing well is better than winning badly, that particular comment [for me] exemplifies one of the more annoying and dangerous facets of the archetypal "British" character (especially in the upper social groups); that of not wanting to appear to be good at anything, let alone "clever".

It's almost a social gaffe in this country to allow it to be known that you're actually good at something, especially something in the STEM fields. You hear it all the time, and every time I hear someone like John Humpries on the morning radio making comic buffoonery out of not knowing what some technical term means I really, really want to slap him. I feel that the editors should be saying "You brainless dickhead - either find out of slash your wrists before returning to the microphone".

If that's what being "British" is all about then it's high time we changed it.

PDR

 

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