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Olympic Games

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CamilleM16
1195320.  Sun Jun 19, 2016 4:28 pm Reply with quote

With Rio de Janeiro coming soon, I couldn't let the O for Olympic go pass me without jumping on it. So here is what I have learned.

In the original Olympic games, when an event was over, the winner was announced, then a judge would place “a palm tree branch on his hands and red ribbons were tied on his head and hands as a mark of victory”. So instead of receiving a medal and flowers, winners were decorated like a Christmas tree.

Also, roman Emperor Nero won the chariot race event at the 67AD Olympic games, despite failing to complete his event. (Though, to be fair, I have to mention that these games were judged invalid after his death, and his name was expunged from the victor-list). So as long as you were important enough at the time, you could win in the Olympic games! That sounds fun. I am not very sporty, but now I know all I have to do to win is to invent time-travel, become a very important part of the roman society (probably having to disguise as a man to achieve so) and then just show up for an event. Easy enough, no?


All of that comes from : The Olympic Games, 2nd edition, A social science perspective, K. Toohey, A.J. Veal, 2007, CABI
Available on Google books:
https://books.google.co.nz/books?id=ywy9aslk3M8C&printsec=frontcover&dq=olympic&hl=fr&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=true

 
Alfred E Neuman
1195349.  Mon Jun 20, 2016 1:00 am Reply with quote

CamilleM16 wrote:
I am not very sporty, but now I know all I have to do to win is to invent time-travel, become a very important part of the roman society (probably having to disguise as a man to achieve so) and then just show up for an event. Easy enough, no?


Didn't they compete naked in the ancient games? That may make the disguise a little more challenging...

 
CB27
1195418.  Mon Jun 20, 2016 7:58 am Reply with quote

Q: Who introduced us to the first Olympian?

I'm sure the researchers can come up with several obvious klaxons, but the real answer is.... William Shakespeare.

In King Henry VI, Part III, Act II, Scene III, George says:

Quote:
Yet let us all together to our troops,
And give them leave to fly that will not stay;
And call them pillars that will stand to us;
And, if we thrive, promise them such rewards
As victors wear at the Olympian games:
This may plant courage in their quailing breasts;
For yet is hope of life and victory.
Forslow no longer, make we hence amain.


It's the first known use of the word Olympian.

 
CamilleM16
1195489.  Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:23 pm Reply with quote

Alfred E Neuman wrote:
Didn't they compete naked in the ancient games? That may make the disguise a little more challenging...


If I'm being perfectly honest, I completely forgot about that little detail... Well, by the time I invent time-travel, I'm sure I'll will also have found time to disguise myself properly as a man... at least well enough to fool ancient people.


And, CB27, that is quite interesting indeed! I'm just not sure I understand what you mean. Had we, as a specie, forgot what Olympic games were, and Shakespeare re-introduced the idea? Or was it the first time in modern time that the word was written down? I am confused, but no less amazed by that fact! Thanks in advance :)

 
Big Martin
1195503.  Tue Jun 21, 2016 2:04 am Reply with quote

I hadn't realised that women weren't even allowed as spectators at the ancient Olympic Games. The book I'm currently reading, Route 66AD (the author following the Roman "tourist trail"), contains a story of a woman who disguised herself as a man to watch her son racing. When he won, she jumped over a fence to congratulate him, caught her clothes and gave the game away.

 
14-11-2014
1195548.  Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:59 am Reply with quote

Quote:
I completely forgot about that little detail...

Perhaps you should. Men were clearly wearing gloves, probably with small metal spikes:

 
'yorz
1195550.  Tue Jun 21, 2016 8:08 am Reply with quote

Only with boxing.

 
suze
1195577.  Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:40 am Reply with quote

Big Martin wrote:
I hadn't realised that women weren't even allowed as spectators at the ancient Olympic Games. The book I'm currently reading, Route 66AD (the author following the Roman "tourist trail"), contains a story of a woman who disguised herself as a man to watch her son racing. When he won, she jumped over a fence to congratulate him, caught her clothes and gave the game away.


That tale goes back to the Greek geographer Pausanías, who wrote about the ancient Olympics some time around the year 150.

The woman spectator had supposedly disguised herself as a trainer in order to gain admission to the arena, and one result of her actions was that trainers were henceforth required to be just as naked as the spectators.

Not all women were debarred from watching the events. The reason for the rule wasn't so much that innocent women shouldn't see all these naked men, but that married women who were familiar with the ways of love mightn't be able to restrain themselves. Consequently, virgin women were allowed in as spectators, and it was common for fathers to bring their unmarried daughters along in the hope of finding them a husband.

What's more, there were lots of prostitutes to be had during the Games. Some elite athletes would even bring their own, but otherwise there was no shortage of women willing to sell themselves to athletes and spectators alike.

source; source

 
14-11-2014
1195640.  Tue Jun 21, 2016 11:30 pm Reply with quote

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Geography_Olympiad

GI: what's an Olympiad?

K: the Games
K: the period between two (Summer and/or Winter) Olympic Games

 
CB27
1195712.  Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:49 am Reply with quote

CamilleM16 wrote:
And, CB27, that is quite interesting indeed! I'm just not sure I understand what you mean. Had we, as a specie, forgot what Olympic games were, and Shakespeare re-introduced the idea? Or was it the first time in modern time that the word was written down? I am confused, but no less amazed by that fact! Thanks in advance :)

We knew of Olympus, and there were words relating to competitions and competitors, etc, but not for something or someone that was specifically an "Olympian", that was introduced by William Shakespeare (or was it David Mitchell in disguise?).

 
swot
1195715.  Wed Jun 22, 2016 11:10 am Reply with quote

14-11-2014 wrote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Geography_Olympiad

GI: what's an Olympiad?

K: the Games
K: the period between two (Summer and/or Winter) Olympic Games


I took part in the 2012 Cultural Olympiad.

 
CamilleM16
1195774.  Wed Jun 22, 2016 5:34 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
We knew of Olympus, and there were words relating to competitions and competitors, etc, but not for something or someone that was specifically an "Olympian", that was introduced by William Shakespeare (or was it David Mitchell in disguise?).


Thank you!! That clears it up for me :)


About women in Olympic Games, apparently some rich women won some medals at the ancient olympics. In horse races, the prizes were awarded to the owner of the horse, not to the charioteers or jockeys. One of them, Kyniska, was well known as she was a daughter to the king of Sparta and ended up building a statue in honour of herself in Olympia, on which she inscribed the very humble :
"Sparta's Kings were fathers and brothers of mine,
But since with my chariots and storming horses I, Kyniska,
Have won the prize, I place my effigy here
And proudly proclaim
That of all Grecian women I first bore the crown"

Again, this can all be found in the book "The Olympic Games: A social science perspective".

 
CB27
1200592.  Tue Aug 02, 2016 12:58 pm Reply with quote

Q. Which country had the most teams competing in the summer Olympics?

Klaxons for USA, UK, Russia, etc.

The answer is Germany.

For the first 5 games, and some of the games afterwards, Germans represented Germany (GER).

Germany was not represented in any way during the 1920, 1924 and 1948 games.

In 1952 Germany (GER) once again participated, but there was also a second team representing the Saar Protectorate (SAA), which was an area of Germany controlled by France. This protectorate would later be absorbed into West Germany.

In the 1956,1960 and 1964 games, Germany once again had only one team to represent them, but it was called the United Team of Germany (EUA).

Then, from 1968 to 1988, with the exception of one games each, there were teams from West Germany (FRG) and East Germany (GDR).

Finally, from 1992 onwards, it was the Germany team (GER) that went to the Olympics.

That makes a total of 5 different teams, with a combined total of 29 appearances from 27 games!

 
Jenny
1200717.  Wed Aug 03, 2016 1:14 pm Reply with quote

I watched a TV programme last night, about the 1936 Berlin Olympics. The assertion there was that they were so spectacular in their day that they set the standard that has caused the cost of staging the Olympic Games to grow exponentially since, as each country strives to outdo the one before.

 
Zziggy
1200732.  Wed Aug 03, 2016 4:20 pm Reply with quote

That was the first one with the Olympic torch relay, wasn't it? It was originally a piece of Nazi propaganda to illustrate some supposed direct link between the ancient Greeks and the German master race, but we do it every year now.

 

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