View previous topic | View next topic

What have you Learned Today?

Page 416 of 427
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 415, 416, 417 ... 425, 426, 427  Next

Jenny
1359860.  Mon Oct 05, 2020 10:04 am Reply with quote

One of my cousins on my father's side has done a lot of genealogical and genetic tracing of family, and thinks we have found a connection we didn't know about before.

My paternal grandfather was abandoned as a baby and brought up in an orphanage. Later, when my father was about ten, he abandoned his own family and disappeared, nobody knew where. Because of the orphanage thing we had no connections before him, and we have no male relatives on that side of the family to trace father's ancestry. However, my cousin thinks she has found somebody who shares enough of our DNA and whose name has not cropped up in previous searches, to think that might be a connection that happened after he left our joint grandmother.

 
extremophilesheep
1359895.  Tue Oct 06, 2020 4:34 am Reply with quote

While in therapy (with EMDR) for things that happened to me in the past, I was asked to look into my family tree to see reoccuring patterns which I knew already existed but mapping them might help. (which it sort of did).

I ended up going through local archives which do seem to have a lot of info on births/deaths and found a pic of my grandfather when he must have been young only to find he never was. Same stern face that runs into that side of the family. I've inherited the eyebrows so it's a bit on me too, somewhat obscured by my glasses and mitigated by my eyes having the genetics from the other side making me look slightly like a manga character.

I've often wondered - the little my parents did tell me about my grandparents (both sides) isn't much, in one case out of lack of interest, in another of not being able to know, and a lot of it seems codswallop. Since therapy concluded with me disconnecting from my parents apart from the bare necessary contact (i.e. "I'm still alive") there's not much source to go on as it by default disconnects me from the rest of the family.

Now they are all getting old and getting on a bit. Ill, frail, dying. I was prepared for that with my parents, but forgot about the rest of the family. Sometimes I'm an eejit.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1359898.  Tue Oct 06, 2020 4:54 am Reply with quote

Big Martin wrote:
It's not going to find out much we haven't already found the hard way.
I really mean the "hard way" of unfolding the original parchment register pages and trying to decipher the vicar's scrawl long before it all was available online.

For me to do it the hard way would involve plane tickets, and even then I have no clue which vicar to bother.

My motherís side of the family has been thoroughly researched and documented, and I got a copy from the distant relative who did that. On my fathers side, Iím fairly up to date with most who were in this country. About all I know about my great grandfather is that he was born in a lighthouse north of Aberdeen. His name is unfortunately not google-able - all you get are pages and pages of info about a historical character whose name overlaps his.

 
PDR
1359899.  Tue Oct 06, 2020 5:15 am Reply with quote

The history of my father's side of the family has been extensively researched and documented in my sister's book "The Writing on the Wall", an excellent and reasonably priced read available from all good bookshops in hard copy and e-book formats.

:0)

PDR

 
Celebaelin
1359904.  Tue Oct 06, 2020 5:57 am Reply with quote

The etymology of the word obscene is disputed but generally it is cited as Latin not Greek as I had previously believed.

Quote:
Obscene. That is the word, a word of contested etymology, that she must hold on to as a talisman. She chooses to believe that obscene means off-stage. To save our humanity, certain things that we may want to see (may want to see because we are human!) must remain off-stage.

(Coetzee 2003: 168).

https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1257&context=ltc

I had been told/taught that it was from the Greek skene (wooden stage for actors) so stuff that was obscene was stuff that didn't bet shown but happened off-stage (murders, sex, etc.)

Quote:
Imagination running wild

Ancient Greek theatre took exactly the opposite approach to staging violence, pushing it all off stage. Despite the many horrific things that happen in Greek tragedy (self-mutilation, child-killing, incest, torture), these are never directly depicted. Instead, the audience is given descriptions, hears off-stage cries, and sees only the aftermath of the bloody action.

https://theconversation.com/how-far-should-we-go-when-depicting-violence-55560

It is argued however this is not the root of the word. For a kick off ob- is a Latin prefix (in the direction of, in front of, before; toward, to, at, upon, about; in the way of; with regard to, because of) not a Greek one.

Quote:
Latin obscenus "offensive," especially to modesty, originally "boding ill, inauspicious," a word of unknown origin; perhaps from ob "in front of" (see ob-) + caenum "filth."

https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=obscene

 
suze
1359927.  Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:42 am Reply with quote

Alfred E Neuman wrote:
About all I know about my great grandfather is that he was born in a lighthouse north of Aberdeen. His name is unfortunately not google-able - all you get are pages and pages of info about a historical character whose name overlaps his.


His father was presumably a lighthouse man, in which case he will have been employed by the Northern Lighthouse Board (which ran the lighthouses for Scotland and the Isle of Man) and will be in its Register of Lightkeepers. That document is kept at the National Records of Scotland offices in Edinburgh (presently closed for reasons which will be apparent, but "working hard" on preparing to re-open).

You're probably not going to travel all the way to Edinburgh just to spend an hour with a reel of microfilm, but there are people who will do it for you, for a fee. A member of the Association of Scottish Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (website) is likely to be the person for that. One imagines that most of the members are tweed jacketed gentlemen of senior years who used to be librarians, and who talk somewhat like Miss Jean Brodie.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1359935.  Tue Oct 06, 2020 2:18 pm Reply with quote

Thanks for that info suze, I might look into that at some stage.

Edit (a few hours later):
I went to the National Records of Scotlandís website, and from there to scotlandspeople.gov.uk and found my great-grandfather, his father and mother and a whole slew of siblings. I donít know when exactly he left Scotland, but it was after 1891. By the end of 1899 he was living in Durban, married and the father of a son. Iíll chat to my aunt and get a bit more on her (and therefore my fatherís) aunts and uncles at the end of November when I next visit her.

It looks like it was probably Buchan Ness Lighthouse where he was born. My great-great-grandfather was born in England, nothing more specific than that so far.

 
Leith
1359946.  Tue Oct 06, 2020 6:20 pm Reply with quote

I have some letters from my Scots great grandmother to her cousins from around 1899, and the second Boer War featured heavily. Sounds like there were a lot of folks from her part of Scotland* involved, as well as from Bristol, where she was living at the time. Perhaps less likely a military venture in your great grandfather's case though Alf, if he was already established there with a family by that time.

* Ullapool on the west coast, where the main road past the old barracks is named Ladysmith Street. Coincidentally, though, her mother was born in Peterhead, just a few miles from Buchan Ness.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1359951.  Wed Oct 07, 2020 2:52 am Reply with quote

My great-grandfather was apparently a sailor, and when he arrived in Durban, decided to stay. My grandfather was born on the same day as the Battle of Talana Hill, which was the first major battle of the second boer war. To the best of my knowledge, my great-grandfather didnít fight in the war. In fact I donít think my ancestors were particularly war-like. My grandfather was too young for WWI and missed WWII too, as he was employed by the railways and was considered essential. My father missed WWII, mostly because he was five when it started.

Iíve found a birth record that matches my great-great-grandfatherís year of birth and all three of his forenames, looks like he was born in Plymouth. I wonder what he was running away from that he ended up on the opposite end of the island in Scotland.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1359954.  Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:03 am Reply with quote

Iím beginning to doubt the ďborn in a lighthouseĒ legend. The parish that he was born in doesnít have a lighthouse*, but it did have a coastguard station, and in the 1891 census it shows his father as being employed by the coastguard. I suspect that a very modest two roomed coastguard cottage has been upgraded to a lighthouse in the family folklore. I will have to consult with some cousins on this.

* The lighthouse at Buchan Ness is not far from the New Slains Castle. But the parish of Slains is nearer the Old Slains Castle, a good few miles further south. I seriously doubt that anyone would go to a neighbouring parish to register a birth in those days.

 
Awitt
1359955.  Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:24 am Reply with quote

One of my great grandmothers learnt that she had been celebrating her birthday on the wrong day for years - because it took her father 3, 4 days to get into the nearest town registry office for it.

 
suze
1359989.  Wed Oct 07, 2020 12:02 pm Reply with quote

Alfred E Neuman wrote:
I seriously doubt that anyone would go to a neighbouring parish to register a birth in those days.


He would not, indeed he would not be allowed to. The formal registration of births, deaths, and marriages was not compulsory in Scotland until 1855. Before then, every parish did have a "Session Clerk" - he was the person to whom one went to register a birth or death - but he charged for the service, and so the working classes tended not to bother.

In the burghs (ie towns) the Session Clerk was a civil servant, but in rural areas it was usually a sideline for the parish schoolmaster. The schoolmaster didn't mind a chance to supplement his unexciting income, and in many rural parishes there weren't many other men who could read and write properly, and who had the use of an "office" (the school room).

The Session Clerk had to be a man, although in practice it was not rare for the schoolmaster to delegate to his wife or adult daughter. The Examiners (auditors) who visited each Session Clerk once a year sometimes commented on this in their reports. While it wasn't really allowed, in practice the Examiners condoned it because women tended to have neater writing!

That changed with the Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1854. That Act provided for the Session Clerks to be paid from public funds rather than from fees paid by their clients, and registration became free at the point of use, and compulsory. The system changed again in 1910, since when parish schoolmasters have not in general been the go to guys.

 
Celebaelin
1360227.  Sun Oct 11, 2020 6:30 pm Reply with quote

Having found myself wondering why medication isn't available for women in the form of pessaries I have discovered that a 'pessary' does specifically mean 'a vaginal suppository' but that tampons are not pessaries. Not that I am in any way qualified to judge but one feels that this is a missed opportunity given the incidence of period pain.

Pessary and suppository are not generally used interchangeably but medical definitions suggest that they are regarded as more or less synonymous by health workers. For my own part the first time I ever heard the word pessary (let alone considered that route of drug administration) was on watching The Meaning of Life until which point I'd assumed suppository was a 'catch all' term.

 
jaygeemack
1360279.  Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:15 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
You're probably not going to travel all the way to Edinburgh just to spend an hour with a reel of microfilm, but there are people who will do it for you, for a fee. A member of the Association of Scottish Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (website) is likely to be the person for that. One imagines that most of the members are tweed jacketed gentlemen of senior years who used to be librarians, and who talk somewhat like Miss Jean Brodie.

I tend to haunt this place when it is open. Unfortunately, I don't have a tweed jacket and have a more West of Scotland accent. If I can find out anything for anyone when it reopens, I would be happy to do so. The online ScotlandsPeople website is still available, but has fewer records available than if you visit in person.

It is a good day out, incidentally, for those who like these things. £15 for a full day perusing the fully-indexed births, deaths, marriages, censuses and other records of Scotland from mid 19th century to present day, and it is only two minutes from Waverley Station.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1360299.  Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:36 am Reply with quote

jaygeemack wrote:
If I can find out anything for anyone when it reopens, I would be happy to do so. The online ScotlandsPeople website is still available, but has fewer records available than if you visit in person.

Thanks, thatís a kind offer. Iíve currently got about twenty tabs open on ScotlandsPeople trying to keep track of a few of the ancestors, and as soon as Iíve got it organised to some extent Iíll send you a message asking for help.

 

Page 416 of 427
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 415, 416, 417 ... 425, 426, 427  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group