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What have you Learned Today?

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barbados
1358993.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 11:09 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
We have found it handy in my work, when people have broken down and have no idea where they are. One woman just recently had told her breakdown service she was on the M20, when, in fact, she was on the A2, not very far from château suze.

Close to J6 per chance?

 
suze
1359001.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 11:49 am Reply with quote

Even people who live around here don't all know their M2 from their M20.

More worryingly, even people who live in this house don't all their know their A228 from their A229. These two roads run more or less parallel, and they both connect the Maidstone sprawl with the Medway Towns - but they do it on opposite sides of the river. I drive one of the two every working day, but I'd have to look at a map to tell you which one it is.

(I just looked at a map, and it's the A229. Had you asked me to guess, I'd have said A228 ...)

 
Jenny
1359028.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 3:07 pm Reply with quote

I've found what3words a useful way of generating passwords for various things. OK they're a pain in the neck to enter (especially as I tend to change letters to numbers or symbols quite often) but if I forget the password I can check the addresses I know I've used to find it out, and they're long enough to be almost unbreakable.

 
bobwilson
1359184.  Wed Sep 23, 2020 5:30 pm Reply with quote

On that subject of passwords - one of my many financial accounts has changed it's log in procedure, apparently because of new regulations. Are there any regulations?

I currently have (among other variants):

a bank account which requires me to use a combination of username/8-character alpha-numeric password (pre-remembered on this computer), and a one-time generated code which I can obtain by sticking my bank card into a portable device and putting in my PIN

a credit card that wants my email address (not remembered on this computer) and password (remembered on this computer when I enter the email address), together with a random selection of characters from a 9 character password (must include upper and lower case plus some punctuation mark)

another credit card which will take my 16 digit card number (pre-remembered on this computer), 6 digit numeric passcode (pre-remembered on this computer), and a random selection of characters from an 8 character password (no restrictions on characters used)

another bank account which takes username and password, followed by a selection of characters from an 8 character password (alpha-numeric - at least 1 numeric required)

and one credit card which takes a login of my email address plus password (pre-remembered) - and no additional authentication.

Guess which account I use most?

 
barbados
1359197.  Thu Sep 24, 2020 1:24 am Reply with quote

bobwilson wrote:

Guess which account I use most?

Probably the same one everyone else would when the get hold of your computer ;)

 
Big Martin
1359269.  Fri Sep 25, 2020 2:39 am Reply with quote

Via a phone call from the unofficial coordinator of our "single name" family history group, that he's discovered that more information can be gleaned from DNA tests these days.
He'd organised DNA tests in the early 2000s from various people with our surname. including my father (and paralympian, Danny), which scientifically proved what we'd long thought; that we're all descended from a pair of Flemish brassfounder brothers who were amongst a number imported to Bristol to kick off industrial scale brassworking in the second quarter on the C18th.
As my father's executor, I've got to agree the extended use of the testing, I believe. As we'd long ago exhausted the information that can be gleaned from parish and census records and have no way of establishing where in the then Austrian Netherlands the brothers came from, it's an interesting development.

 
CB27
1359381.  Sun Sep 27, 2020 11:06 am Reply with quote

Try a website called Geni. Myself and a couple of relatives decided to register and put in as much information as we could find, and it has a decent "matching" process that looks at family trees of other members and suggests matches of various levels. We found some relatives that were lost to time, and some that everyone assumed no longer existed.

On the former, I was able to contact the grandson of one of my paternal grandad's brothers, who was living in the US, with a completely different surname, and we matched through the birth date and approximate location of his grandfather, the first name, and a slight difference in the surname. Not only were we able to confirm it was one and the same person (and therefore that we were related), but I had early Pathe movie of his grandad playing trumpet and singing in 1929 (under the wrong surname spelling that he adopted in the US, but was originally a stage name). His grandson had never met him, and never seen him on film or heard his voice (he had records he played on, but that was only music).

On the latter, we found a distant cousin of my mum who everyone assumed had perished during WWII as a toddler. It turned out that he was rescued, and knew how to say his surname, but not spell it, so it was spelled differently and he was too young to know\remember anything about his family except where he came from and his parents' names. 60+ years later his daughter's partner was registering details on Geni and we got a soft match based on some of the details she added for him - turned out the name he remembered for his dad was his middle name, and most databases were searching on first name and surname, one of which was wrong, the other misspelled. His mother's name matched, as well as his first name, approximate age and place of birth. As he was retired he decided to do a world tour to visit some of his new relatives (including us), and from sight alone we could show how similar he was to some people in the family, and we were even able to give him his real date of birth, something he didn't know before.

 
Big Martin
1359406.  Mon Sep 28, 2020 1:49 am Reply with quote

We had a similar name change thing arise when we were trying to get in touch with any Canadian descendants of the brother of my great grandfather's second wife. Their family was from Suffolk and the parents (and several other siblings) died in a diptheria outbreak. The two youngest girls got placed in Muller's Orphanage in Bristol (hence in a position to eventually meet my ancestor) and one of the surviving brothers was taken in by a childless aunt and uncle. When their employer moved to Canada, they went with him.
The family's surname started with an E, but I imagine, pronouncing this with a broad East Anglian accent, it would have sounded like it began with an A to the immigration authorities and our Canadian "relatives" continue that way.

 
Awitt
1359411.  Mon Sep 28, 2020 2:58 am Reply with quote

One of my mother's grandfathers was in Australia by the time of WWI, but due to the name being German, changed it from Steinman to Steadman, with the latter appearing on the gravestone and plaque in my childhood church where a stainglass window was placed after being removed from an inner city church that was demolished due to the water damage that weakened the foundations.

If not for mum telling me this, I may not know it now.

 
Celebaelin
1359819.  Sun Oct 04, 2020 8:07 pm Reply with quote

The cost of monoclonal antibodies appears to have come down by a lot since I worked with them.

The 15 most widely used MAbs average out at $9,200 per gram - roughly 1/140th of the cost of a one-off production run back in the mid 80's although that's comparing apples and oranges somewhat in terms of production quantities.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1359832.  Mon Oct 05, 2020 2:55 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
Try a website called Geni. Myself and a couple of relatives decided to register and put in as much information as we could find, and it has a decent "matching" process that looks at family trees of other members and suggests matches of various levels. We found some relatives that were lost to time, and some that everyone assumed no longer existed.

On the former, I was able to contact the grandson of one of my paternal grandad's brothers, who was living in the US, with a completely different surname, and we matched through the birth date and approximate location of his grandfather, the first name, and a slight difference in the surname. Not only were we able to confirm it was one and the same person (and therefore that we were related), but I had early Pathe movie of his grandad playing trumpet and singing in 1929 (under the wrong surname spelling that he adopted in the US, but was originally a stage name). His grandson had never met him, and never seen him on film or heard his voice (he had records he played on, but that was only music).

On the latter, we found a distant cousin of my mum who everyone assumed had perished during WWII as a toddler. It turned out that he was rescued, and knew how to say his surname, but not spell it, so it was spelled differently and he was too young to know\remember anything about his family except where he came from and his parents' names. 60+ years later his daughter's partner was registering details on Geni and we got a soft match based on some of the details she added for him - turned out the name he remembered for his dad was his middle name, and most databases were searching on first name and surname, one of which was wrong, the other misspelled. His mother's name matched, as well as his first name, approximate age and place of birth. As he was retired he decided to do a world tour to visit some of his new relatives (including us), and from sight alone we could show how similar he was to some people in the family, and we were even able to give him his real date of birth, something he didn't know before.


This... Was an emotional rollercoaster. It's wonderful that you found each other.

On a somewhat similar note, a friend of mine who was illegally adopted in the 1950s with her adoptive parents on her birth cert found her biological siblings via such a DNA tracing service. One of her sisters' daughter could be one of her daughters' twin. Now she knows more about her background she's also glad she was adopted because apparently the siblings her biological parents kept did not have a great life growing up.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Alfred E Neuman
1359834.  Mon Oct 05, 2020 4:14 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
Try a website called Geni.

Not at $120 I won’t.

 
CB27
1359837.  Mon Oct 05, 2020 4:38 am Reply with quote

We all use the free version, and once you're linked there's a lot you can do.

A few years back when we wanted to find some old data I went Pro, and on the back of my work it updated everyone's trees, but I stopped it once we got most of what we wanted - it was cheaper back then, $120 does sound a bit much now.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1359851.  Mon Oct 05, 2020 6:58 am Reply with quote

I went there, created an account, added a couple of people, did a search and it asked for my credit card to show the results. In response, I deleted my account. It honestly doesn’t bother me that much.

 
Big Martin
1359852.  Mon Oct 05, 2020 7:18 am Reply with quote

It's not going to find out much we haven't already found the hard way.
I really mean the "hard way" of unfolding the original parchment register pages and trying to decipher the vicar's scrawl long before it all was available online.

 

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