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What have you Learned Today?

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Leith
1358925.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:11 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
All we can really do with that notion is to note that it does not possess that flavour today. (I've stolen that sentence from Mrs Beeton, who used it in failing to explain why the salsify is also known as the vegetable oyster.)

I used to quite like the big plates of salsify sautéed in butter that they served in the office canteen in France. Cooked in that style I can just about see the oyster comparison (there's a certain texture and savouryness), but it's quite a stretch. I don't recall ever seeing the stuff for sale in the UK - I guess it's fallen out of favour if it was ever popular here.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1358926.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:32 pm Reply with quote

In German it's known as winter asparagus. I wish I could find it here more often.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Celebaelin
1358928.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:41 pm Reply with quote

Maybe don't commercialise it huh?

I'm guessing you could ask tets for good foraging tips.

 
suze
1358931.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 5:32 pm Reply with quote

If an artichoke is either a thistle or a sunflower, a salsify is actually a dandelion.

The posh green supermarket which is strictly for millionaires started to sell it amid some fanfare a couple of years back, but appears not to sell it any more. Seeds are readily available, though.

 
Awitt
1358934.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 5:49 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Quote:
I'm not surprised that you weren't familiar with collard greens, since that name is only really used in the US. In Britain we have kale


This magazine is Australian produced but maybe they were going for words to fill the puzzle, and I have heard of kale, thanks to the 'movement' of healthy eating.

 
franticllama
1358940.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 12:58 am Reply with quote

Leith wrote:

I used to quite like the big plates of salsify sautéed in butter that they served in the office canteen in France. Cooked in that style I can just about see the oyster comparison (there's a certain texture and savouryness), but it's quite a stretch. I don't recall ever seeing the stuff for sale in the UK - I guess it's fallen out of favour if it was ever popular here.


The fancy chef of my acquaintance uses salsify a fair amount though he is of the belief that it basically takes on the taste of whatever it is cooked in / with so it isn't unusual to find it on both a main and a dessert*

*Obviously not on the same tasting menu at the same time - he's not a philistine.

 
crissdee
1358949.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 4:46 am Reply with quote

Lying in bed this moring, musing on this and that, it occurred to me that the "what3words" system of location has a pretty fundamental flaw to my way of thinking. The best way I can illustrate it is this;

If you are standing outside No 7 in any given street, and are looking for No 42, you will have a fair idea of where you need to go.

My house is (according to their system) Flop.Plank.Matrons

One of these;

Umbrellas.Fled.Certainty

Speaks.Belly.With

is the next square along. Without consulting the system can you tell which is my next door neighbour? Of course you can't, because there seems to be no logical progression in the system. With GPS data, postcodes, or you know.........addresses, there is a logical way to navigate from one to another, or at least have a fair idea of how far away any given place is from another, and in what direction.

This system seems to have very limited application.

 
cnb
1358953.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 4:57 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
This system seems to have very limited application.

It's designed for a world in which GPS-enabled mobile navigation devices are ubiquitous. You don't need to understand how the system works, you just enter the destination, and your device tells you how far away it is, and in which direction.

 
barbados
1358960.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 6:43 am Reply with quote

AIUI the thought process of what3words is to locate people that are lost, not people that would like to know the way from the coffee shop in the high street to the local bordello. If it is directions you’re after there are any number of apps available to assist

 
Alfred E Neuman
1358962.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 6:52 am Reply with quote

If you’re lost, how do you know what three words to use?

 
cnb
1358964.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 7:17 am Reply with quote

barbados wrote:
AIUI the thought process of what3words is to locate people that are lost, not people that would like to know the way from the coffee shop in the high street to the local bordello. If it is directions you’re after there are any number of apps available to assist


They use that example to promote the app in the UK, but it is not the principle purpose for which the app was designed. It was designed to provide a universal tool to locate places - whether they were 'addresses' or not - with a particular focus on parts of the world where there was not already a reliable addressing or location system in place, and which could be communicated easily and unambiguously in local language.

If I called you and suggested that you join me on a beaver hunt, it would be much easier, and more likely to be remembered correctly, if I told you to meet me at quite.interesting.things than at N57° 33.421' W133° 58.144'.

 
cnb
1358965.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 7:22 am Reply with quote

Alfred E Neuman wrote:
If you’re lost, how do you know what three words to use?

You open the app and it will tell you the three-word address of your current location. It can do that offline without a data connection, as often in remote locations there is phone signal, but no data connection.

 
PDR
1358967.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 7:37 am Reply with quote

Alfred E Neuman wrote:
If you’re lost, how do you know what three words to use?


"Where am I?" would seem appropriate.

:0)

The idea is that if you have a gps-capable phone/tablet/airliner with you then you have the downloaded app which will tell you what your current location is. You can then phone someone and get help. It is predicated on the idea that you have universal GSM phone coverage, which may be an issue, but then if you don't you can't call for help anyway (unless you have a satalite phone or a dehydrated carrier pigeon and some water).

PDR

 
Alfred E Neuman
1358974.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 9:05 am Reply with quote

How quaint. Using a phone to make a call. I must try that some day. :-)

 
tetsabb
1358982.  Mon Sep 21, 2020 9:26 am Reply with quote

We have found it handy in my work, when people have broken down and have no idea where they are. One woman just recently had told her breakdown service she was on the M20, when, in fact, she was on the A2, not very far from château suze.

 

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