View previous topic | View next topic

What have you Learned Today?

Page 413 of 418
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 412, 413, 414 ... 416, 417, 418  Next

Celebaelin
1358840.  Sat Sep 19, 2020 10:08 am Reply with quote

Hence the expression 'bonehead'; not to be confused with 'boner head' which is something different altogether.

 
Awitt
1358869.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 3:54 am Reply with quote

With others talking about puzzles - RLD's proof reading of them and CB27's mother - from doing one myself, I have learnt a new word to describe immature soybeans - edamame.

 
extremophilesheep
1358871.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:02 am Reply with quote

A term I'm for once already familiar with - the things crop up in all kinds of recipes and salads here, and in pokebowls.

 
PDR
1358872.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:04 am Reply with quote

extremophilesheep wrote:
and in pokebowls.


I yulegreaved that as "pukebowls"...

PDR

 
Awitt
1358877.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 5:02 am Reply with quote

The puzzle I'm doing is a wordsearch for types of green vegetables. I also had to look up samphire and collard greens.

 
extremophilesheep
1358880.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 5:55 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
extremophilesheep wrote:
and in pokebowls.


I yulegreaved that as "pukebowls"...

PDR


Since it wouldn't be for me, that might be the case. Me on the other hand, I am always dissappointed when I see one on display that does not include Pikachu.

 
RLDavies
1358886.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 7:14 am Reply with quote

I immediately read "pokebowl" as meaning a big Pokemon tournament.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1358888.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 7:33 am Reply with quote

Nom, edemame! Best steamed and salted with a nice, cold beer. 🤤

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1358890.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 8:28 am Reply with quote

Awitt wrote:
I also had to look up samphire and collard greens.


I'm not surprised that you weren't familiar with collard greens, since that name is only really used in the US. In Britain we have kale which is a very similar brassica, while the good husband tells me that back in his school days the name spring greens was used. Poor man's cabbage, whatever you call it.

Samphire practically disappeared from the tables of the English-speaking world for five hundred years, but has reappeared in the last fifteen or so. It is by now being farmed, but until those fairly recent years it was rarely eaten and was foraged by the relatively few who wanted it.

Its return to favour has a lot to do with the TV presenter Gregg Wallace. Mr Wallace was a greengrocer before he took to television, and he had long been selling samphire foraged from the salt marshes near his home in Whitstable. A handful of chefs at fancy restaurants bought his samphire, and when one of them used it in a recipe on his TV show, all of a sudden everybody wanted it.

 
Efros
1358891.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 9:36 am Reply with quote

I remember a TV programme from quite a while back praising the cardoon, no rush on cardoons at the shops. Probably because not many shops if any actually had them and it's a friggin thistle! Yes it's related to the artichoke, choke being the relevant part of that word.

 
tetsabb
1358900.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 10:51 am Reply with quote

There is a spot between Folkestone and Dover called Samphire Hoe, which always gives me an inner chuckle whenever it is mentioned.

 
PDR
1358904.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:18 am Reply with quote

"Samphire Ho" - sounds like a euphemism for a young lady from sloane square...

PDR

 
suze
1358906.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:36 am Reply with quote

Efros wrote:
Yes it's related to the artichoke, choke being the relevant part of that word.


The globe artichoke must be a contender for the world's most pointless vegetable. I've never attempted to prepare this vegetable myself, but preparation appears to involve throwing away 90% of the vegetable and then wishing you'd thrown away the other 10%. And as you say, it's a thistle.

The Jerusalem artichoke is neither an artichoke nor from Jerusalem. It's actually a sunflower, and the Jerusalem bit is supposed to be a corruption of the Italian girasole (= sunflower). Why the Old World ever resorted to the Italian name of a plant which had been discovered by English and French explorers in the New World is not at once clear.

As for the artichoke bit, well the 16th century French explorer Samuel de Champlain - a man about who every Canadian school kid is taught far too much - thought that this sunflower tasted like an artichoke. All we can really do with that notion is to note that it does not possess that flavour today. (I've stolen that sentence from Mrs Beeton, who used it in failing to explain why the salsify is also known as the vegetable oyster.)

 
crissdee
1358922.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 3:52 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
The globe artichoke must be a contender for the world's most pointless vegetable. I've never attempted to prepare this vegetable myself, but preparation appears to involve throwing away 90% of the vegetable and then wishing you'd thrown away the other 10%.


Was it not Mr Pepys who said;

"Cucumbers should be thinly sliced, dressed with salt and pepper, then thrown away."?

 
Celebaelin
1358924.  Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:07 pm Reply with quote

Dr. Johnson I believe - and vinegar and pepper IIRC.

I'll check.

The best source on this appears to be our own site!

post 629251

Or at least so I hope.

exnihilo wrote:
I regard it like a plate of cucumber dressed with oil and vinegar and yet fit for nothing but to throw out the window.

Bishop of Peterborough to the Earl of Nottingham in 1689


Last edited by Celebaelin on Sun Sep 20, 2020 4:15 pm; edited 2 times in total

 

Page 413 of 418
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 412, 413, 414 ... 416, 417, 418  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group