View previous topic | View next topic

I don't know if it's art...

Page 7 of 8
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

Celebaelin
1355229.  Fri Aug 07, 2020 5:48 pm Reply with quote

It's not entirely relevant to this conversation because it's a different form of creativity but in the past I've felt 'ripped off' by mainstream guitarists upon occasion. Unfinished work that I've played in music shops seems to appear on established artist's albums! The fact that I'd built those ideas on the back of those self-same artist's previous work has nothing to do with that of course!

 
crissdee
1355264.  Sat Aug 08, 2020 5:18 am Reply with quote

My mate who is also a mate of Alan Davis once said something similar about the "stand-up" circuit". Somebody comes up with some kind of "gag", dares to show it in front of other stand-ups, and pretty soon it is out there for everyone. I might say that he (my mate) was the first person I was aware of to see the comic potential of a pipe.

 
Celebaelin
1355274.  Sat Aug 08, 2020 9:49 am Reply with quote

This is not a pipe.

To risk over-burdening the gag with explanation.

 
Celebaelin
1357893.  Mon Sep 07, 2020 9:37 am Reply with quote



Mercy: David Spareth Saul's Life Richard Dadd - 1854

1 Samuel 24 (1-22 i.e. all of it)

 
Jenny
1357914.  Mon Sep 07, 2020 1:48 pm Reply with quote

That's the kind of narrative painting nobody seems to paint these days, but isn't Richard Dadd better known for somewhat more fantastical stuff?

 
suze
1357922.  Mon Sep 07, 2020 4:44 pm Reply with quote

Richard Dadd came from the Medway Towns. He was born in Chatham, went to a very old school where I once applied for and didn't get a job, and murdered his father for which crime he was committed to Broadmoor.

I'll be the first to admit that I know little of art, but he was clearly not of sound mind - and on that basis, it's certainly more the second kind of work with which I would associate him.

 
Celebaelin
1357955.  Tue Sep 08, 2020 6:33 am Reply with quote

Both were painted after he was committed to Broadmoor (1843) - the above The Fairy Feller's Master-Stroke was an ongoing work of his between 1855–64 and showcases his obsession with detail. It inspired Freddie Mercury to write a song of the same name which is a sort of sister piece to Bohemian Rhapsody. Three of the eight Dadd siblings were committed to mental institutions.

Quote:
Dadd’s brother George was admitted to Bethlem when Richard was fleeing after killing their father. His sister Maria married in 1844, but was having mental health issues by 1853, and in an asylum by 1859. Another brother was said to have a ‘private attendant’ for unknown reasons.

https://www.lifedeathprizes.com/real-life-crime/artist-richard-dadd-69666

 
Celebaelin
1358020.  Wed Sep 09, 2020 7:08 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
...isn't Richard Dadd better known for somewhat more fantastical stuff?

Sorry, I didn't answer that did I?

He painted quite a few works that were 'away with the faeries' but he wasn't alone in that at the time. His pictures from his 1842-3 trip to the Middle-East as the artist for Sir Thomas Phillips (1801– 26 May 1867) form another portion of his work and include this portrait of Phillips



Sir Thomas Phillips Richard Dadd (1842-3)

and this lost work that came to light on the Antiques Roadshow and was bought by The British Museum for a flat £100,000.



The Artist's Halt in the Desert Richard Dadd (c.1845)

Verso inscribed in French by the artist: “Ici on voit clair de lune peigné des recollections qui existent dans la tête du peinteur, et des certains marques et lines dans la livre petit que je crois de n’avoir pas ete dans le possession du Sir Thos. Phillips. C’est sur le bord de la Mer Morte tout pres un petit rousseau, entre le Jordan Fleuve et les Montagnes sur le route a St Sabre.”

That TV show was the first time I'd heard of him.

 
crissdee
1358032.  Wed Sep 09, 2020 8:35 am Reply with quote

I remember that coming up on A.R. and how stunned we were as a family about the quality of the light depiction. Really looks like there is a bulb or something behind the canvas. There was something similar at the Sherlock Holmes exhibition that tetsabb and I went to.



Photo does not do it justice, but it was quite beautiful.

 
Jenny
1358038.  Wed Sep 09, 2020 9:21 am Reply with quote

Yesterday at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art I was looking at an exhibition of the work of an artist called Emily Nelligan, who died a couple of years ago. She worked in charcoal, and when I first walked into the room hung with all these monochrome pictures I thought they would be dull, but as I walked round and looked at them more closely I found myself increasingly drawn to them.

Interested parties can find a lot of images of what I saw here:

https://www.alexandregallery.com/emily-nelligan

 
Celebaelin
1359111.  Tue Sep 22, 2020 5:46 pm Reply with quote



St. Paul - Giotto Di Bondone (1291 Gregorian)

It's quite round... as you'd expect.

 
Jenny
1359161.  Wed Sep 23, 2020 12:45 pm Reply with quote

When we visited Assisi in (I think) 2012 they were restoring the Giotto frescoes in the church of St Francis - work that has been going on since the 1997 earthquake that caused a lot of damage - and we were able to go on platforms on the scaffolding and get quite a good look at them. I wasn't desperately impressed with the quality of the restoration and apparently somebody else agrees with me.

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/appalling-restoration-destroys-giotto-frescoes-at-the-basilica-of-saint-francis-in-assisi-261811

 
Celebaelin
1367629.  Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:38 pm Reply with quote


Baumgarten Klimt 1905-6

(This is a slightly clipped image but at least its not as massive as some others are)

Celebaelin wrote:
Has just sold for £47,971,250 ($59,321,248) at Sotheby’s - the third highest price paid for a work in
Europe.


A more extensively clipped version appears on the wall behind one of the BBC's favourite commentators on
COVID-19 issues.

I don't know if that makes her necessarily any more credible but we certainly seem to agree on something!


Last edited by Celebaelin on Wed Dec 09, 2020 12:31 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Jenny
1367731.  Wed Dec 09, 2020 12:13 pm Reply with quote

Wow! I rather like Klimt's work, as it goes, but shall now restrain myself from pining to own one.

 
Celebaelin
1367740.  Wed Dec 09, 2020 12:49 pm Reply with quote

That's a quote from post 1228642 originally posted in March 2017.

One of his prettier creations certainly - and in that vein


Bauerngarten mit Sonnenblumen
Farm Garden with Sunflowers


There's some disagreement about both the precise title and the date but the Austrian gallery where it's held
says it's

Bauerngarten mit Sonnenblumen
Brauhausgarten in Litzlberg am Attersee

and

1907

so I'll take their word for it.

 

Page 7 of 8
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group