View previous topic | View next topic

Lavatorial euphemisms

Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2

'yorz
1183434.  Wed Mar 23, 2016 4:23 am Reply with quote

Of course! Something goes 'down the pan' - it failed, was aborted.

 
dr.bob
1183448.  Wed Mar 23, 2016 5:22 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
A word means what it is used to mean, not what its etymology indicates it to mean.


In which case, a "Hoover" is a vacuum cleaner, not a trade name. That's arguably true, but is deviating from the point that's trying to be made about the John.

suze wrote:
Anus is the Latin word for a ring, but no one would ever say "Oh, my boyfriend asked me to marry him and gave me a lovely diamond anus". (Anyone who would say this will please keep that fact to themselves ...)


I wouldn't have, but I'm certainly going to try in future :)

suze wrote:
And since we never use lavatory in any sense other than "Defecation and Urination Facility", that is what it means.


Are you sure that's true?

In the OED definition of lavatory, it states that "The word originally denoted something in which to wash, such as a bath or piscina, later (mid 17th century) a room with washing facilities; the current sense dates from the 19th century."

This sounds to me that lavatory was originally used as a different meaning as something that you wash things in. It was then modified over time to refer to the WC, much in the same way that "toilet" was.

I think you'll have to take back any points you gave to crissdee.

 
suze
1183536.  Wed Mar 23, 2016 12:18 pm Reply with quote

It did originally mean a room in which to wash, but that's not the way we use it now. In Britain, a room containing a bathtub and/or shower alongside a DUF and a wash basin is called a bathroom.

In North America, a bathroom may be a room containing only a DUF and a wash basin. Washroom is a predominantly Canadian usage for the same thing, while restroom implies a public facility containing multiple DUFs. Sleeping in a restroom is likely to get you arrested; restrooms are not for resting in. If a North American needs to convey that a "bathroom" also contains a bathtub and/or shower, she calls it a full bathroom.

At such time as toilet loses its other meaning completely, then I'll allow it as not a euphemism - although again its etymology is euphemistic - but we're not there yet.

As for water closet, I think I'm arguing that it was at one time a non-euphemistic word for a lavatory, but no longer. I'm not sure that the young people even know this term, and if I said water closet in class they'd think I meant some facility for the storage of bottled water. We do in fact have such a facility in school, but it's not called the water closet. Perhaps it should be!

crissdee keeps his points!

 
'yorz
1183540.  Wed Mar 23, 2016 12:41 pm Reply with quote

Diffusion Under epitaxial Film
Drug Use Forecasting
Domain of unknown function
Danzantes Unidos Festival
Dog Under Foot
Defensive Use Of Firearms
Durham Ultimate Frisbee
Domain Unknown Function
Dispositivo Urinario Femenino

Spoilt for option.
Which is the correct one?

 
suze
1183541.  Wed Mar 23, 2016 1:01 pm Reply with quote

None of the above.

"Defecation and Urination Facility", as per post 1183370.

 
crissdee
1183544.  Wed Mar 23, 2016 1:34 pm Reply with quote

monzac wrote:
Pan.


My second job after uni involved delivering these, amongst other bathroom fittings. I have thus had my hand down more than a few u-bends, that being by far the easiest way to carry an empty pan.

 
dr.bob
1183747.  Fri Mar 25, 2016 4:47 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
At such time as toilet loses its other meaning completely, then I'll allow it as not a euphemism


Does anyone really still use the word "toilet" in any meaning other than a DUF?

suze wrote:
although again its etymology is euphemistic


Which is surely the point that's being made.

Perhaps the script should've said "there is no term for the bog that does not have a euphemistic etymology" rather than just describing it as a euphemism.

Indeed, it may well have said that. I can't remember the precise wording of the factoid.

 
Jenny
1282220.  Tue Apr 24, 2018 3:16 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:


And since we never use lavatory in any sense other than "Defecation and Urination Facility", that is what it means.



I don't know how I missed this the first time round (followed the link from Another Thread to get here) but I have to klaxon this one, at least on my side of the Atlantic.

In the architect-lingo of my husband, a lavatory is a washbasin - the kind you find in a bathroom, that you wash your hands in. It is not, repeat not, a toilet.

 
suze
1282227.  Tue Apr 24, 2018 4:06 pm Reply with quote

I think that must be a US-ism.

When I was a kid in Canada, lavatory was what posh people called the toilet. My mom, being ever so slightly Jean Brodie as she was, considered the word toilet vulgar and preferred my sister and me to call it lavatory. My dad called it all sorts of things, most of which actually were vulgar. Mom gave up on trying to "correct" his usage.

I've never been in the habit of referring to bathroom tissue as TP, as many Americans do in order to avoid mentioning the unmentionable. Mom had her moments with that, even though she didn't like the t-word on its own.

 
dr.bob
1282276.  Wed Apr 25, 2018 6:21 am Reply with quote

Why didn't she just call it "Bog Roll", like everyone else ;-)

 
suze
1282311.  Wed Apr 25, 2018 11:45 am Reply with quote

Would Jean Brodie have called it bog roll? If you read that sentence in your best Maggie Smith Edinburgh, well that's pretty much how I wrote it!

But in fact, that name for the place - and hence the associated paper - is mostly British, and isn't used much in North America.

The said paper was always labeled as "bathroom tissue" in the Canada of my youth, just as it always used to be in Britain. From a perusal of the cupboard, I discover that the Co-op's own brand product is still labeled "bathroom tissue", while Tesco's isn't labeled anything and you have to know what it is. (On their website they call it "toilet roll".)

Britain's leading brand isn't labeled anything either, although I'm willing to accept that the name Andrex on its own is enough. The Kimberly-Clark Corporation of Irving TX doesn't use that name for any other product, and it is perhaps surprising that Andrex hasn't become a generic name in Britain in the same way as Durex.

Is this non-labeling unique? Everyone knows that Coca-Cola is a sparkling soft drink with vegetable extracts, and everyone knows what the red gloop in a distinctively shaped Heinz bottle is. Even so, they tell you on the package - but Andrex doesn't tell you what it is or what it's for.

 
Brock
1282314.  Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:01 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:

Is this non-labeling unique? Everyone knows that Coca-Cola is a sparkling soft drink with vegetable extracts, and everyone knows what the red gloop in a distinctively shaped Heinz bottle is.


Aren't they required to do so by food labelling regulations?

Quote:
Even so, they tell you on the package - but Andrex doesn't tell you what it is or what it's for.


That's presumably because you don't eat it!

 
Bondee
1282336.  Wed Apr 25, 2018 1:48 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Would Jean Brodie have called it bog roll?


Of course not. She'd call it "arse tokens".

 
crissdee
1282343.  Wed Apr 25, 2018 2:08 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Tesco's isn't labeled anything and you have to know what it is. (On their website they call it "toilet roll".)


The stuff we have from Tesco's is made for them under a different name, but it calls itself "toilet tissue".

 
suze
1282360.  Wed Apr 25, 2018 4:17 pm Reply with quote

Brock wrote:
That's presumably because you don't eat it!


Speak for yourself ...!

But yes, food labeling rules undoubtedly have something to do with it, and do not ordinarily apply to bathroom tissue.

 

Page 2 of 2
Goto page Previous  1, 2

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group