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Gadgets after your own heart

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Jenny
7910.  Thu Jul 22, 2004 9:32 pm Reply with quote

Who amongst us could resist this one?

http://www.awolmachine.com/

 
Jenny
7911.  Fri Jul 23, 2004 9:19 am Reply with quote

Fortuitously, Mark Morford's column today is on exactly this subject of gadgets:

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2004/07/23/notes072304.DTL&nl=fix

I'm trying to remember what the defining gadget of my youth was. Probably the cassette recorder, primitive as that sounds now. Imagine, you could have the music of your choice in your car!

 
Frances
7920.  Sun Jul 25, 2004 3:31 am Reply with quote

For me, it was the ballpoint pen. No more sharpening pencils, or leaking ink - though the early biros did leak, now I come to think of it. But my teacher was dead against them, which of course made them totally irresistible.

 
Jenny
7932.  Mon Jul 26, 2004 7:59 am Reply with quote

Yes, I remember being not allowed to use biros at school. We had to use a fountain pen because it promoted good penmanship and that is Important as eny fule kno. As for using pencil in a piece of school work - that was beyond the pale.

Nowadays I think the teachers are so glad to get any work at all out of the little buggers that they don't look too closely.

 
Frances
7936.  Tue Jul 27, 2004 4:47 am Reply with quote

The best thing ever for schoolkids was the WPC. It makes even rubbish look tidy.

The invention teachers really need, though, is a valium spray gun, to cool the troublemakers and let the rest get on with the work. But somebody would complain that it was cruel and unusual, and a denial of the little horros' right to disrupt everybody else's education.

 
andym
7950.  Wed Jul 28, 2004 8:59 am Reply with quote

Jumpingjack himself showed me the first Walkman I had ever seen - it seemed mind-boggling at the time-

But what is an ipod, really, other than just a walkman without any moving parts? A Standman, perhaps

 
Sapientum
7991.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 3:44 am Reply with quote

Dr. Michael Bull -- also known by many as "Professor iPod" -- is a lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Sussex in the UK and just happens to be making a study of all things mobile and noise making.

Quote:
MB: The iPod has become a cultural icon. The other players don't have that. It's very much like the Walkman in that regard. Everyone says "Walkman" rather than "personal stereo" for a reason. As I collected people's responses to my questionnaires, it became obvious that it would just be easier to focus on iPods. The industry might want to compare all the different machines but personally I'm interested in the phenomenon of the iPod, as a state of the art device.

More of this article here.

 
andym
7992.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 3:57 am Reply with quote

But who has time to organise thousands of tracks? That's what I'd like to know.

 
Commander
7994.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 5:50 am Reply with quote

andym wrote:
But who has time to organise thousands of tracks? That's what I'd like to know.


That's the beauty of the iPod though. You can just set it to 'shuffle' and off it goes. We set up a list for my partner to give birth to the other day. Great for parties too, and you can use it through your car stereo. Indispensible I'd say.

 
Jenny
8001.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 9:03 am Reply with quote

I love the casual way he slips the information about his partner giving birth into an enthusiastic encomium about the iPod....

Congratulations Commander and MrsCommander! Any details you would care to share would be welcome :-)

 
Flash
8002.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 9:12 am Reply with quote

I read it as the partner giving birth to the list. A figure of speech, I thought.

 
Jenny
8005.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:08 pm Reply with quote

A Freudian slip maybe?

 
Sapientum
8006.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:37 pm Reply with quote

...or did he mean that giving birth was great for parties too?

I totally agree about the suffling though. The "Apple of my iPod" is currently shuffling its way through 6,321 tracks and I haven't heard a single repeat in 3 weeks.

 
Jenny
8008.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 2:11 pm Reply with quote

6,321 tracks?

<feels faint and has to go for a lie-down>


Life's too short...

 
andym
8010.  Mon Aug 02, 2004 3:54 pm Reply with quote

But you still have to put the tracks onto it don't you? That must take ages.
Oh no no.

 

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