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Christmas Special?

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eggshaped
64794.  Tue Apr 11, 2006 5:13 am Reply with quote

Just a quickie for the possible Christmas Show, if we cover pantomimes,

Question: When might you have seen The Queen dressed as a man?

Answer: During WWII in panto.

Notes:
During World War Two, The Queen took part in a number of pantomimes which were held in the Waterloo Chamber at Windsor Castle. In a 1941 performance of Cinderella she played the part of Prince Florizel* - presumably wearing the traditional male costume.

http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/page4833.asp

*(I don't remember this character being in Cinderella?)

 
MatC
64817.  Tue Apr 11, 2006 6:55 am Reply with quote

So, Hoover wasn't a TV, but Her Madge was!

 
ryewacket
64820.  Tue Apr 11, 2006 7:00 am Reply with quote

A drag Queen, in fact.

 
MatC
64843.  Tue Apr 11, 2006 8:38 am Reply with quote

garrick92 wrote:
A drag Queen, in fact.


He shoots, he scores!

 
ryewacket
64844.  Tue Apr 11, 2006 8:40 am Reply with quote

<pulls shirtfront over head, runs around madly before skidding some distance on his knees and simulating sexual acts with teammates>

 
eggshaped
67049.  Mon Apr 24, 2006 10:51 am Reply with quote

Question: Why does Rudolph the Red nosed reindeer have a very shiny nose?

Answer: Because he suffers from a chronic parasitic infection.

Notes:
Reindeer noses, with their elaborately folded turbinal bones and blood-rich membranes are a wonderful breeding ground for bugs. According to expert on reindeer nostrils Odd Halvorsen of the University of Oslo, it is most likely one of these bugs which is responsible for an infection of Rudolph’s respiratory system which leads to his famous red nose.

Reindeer have about twenty parasites which are unique to their species; it is little wonder, with the increased stress of pulling Santa’s sleigh, that the infection shows itself as a red nose.

 
MatC
67748.  Sat Apr 29, 2006 4:41 am Reply with quote

Transvestism can kill:

“When in 1782 the actor Bannister played the character of Polly Peachum in ‘The Beggar’s Opera’ [...] one member of the audience ‘was thrown into hysterics which continued without intermission until Friday morning when she expired.’”

- ‘London the biography’ by Peter Ackroyd.

 
Flash
67814.  Sat Apr 29, 2006 4:08 pm Reply with quote

Do we know which night of the week the performance was?

 
MatC
68032.  Mon May 01, 2006 4:38 am Reply with quote

Rather a good question, to which the answer is no. Mercy larks, let us hope it weren't Monday!

 
Molly Cule
68785.  Sat May 06, 2006 10:36 am Reply with quote

St Enodoc chuch is built amid sand dunes in Cornwall. Betjeman was buried there in 1984. In the 19th C the church was completely covered in sand. The locals christened it " sinkininny church " for they believed it was sinking. The vicar had to perform services inside it each year so that the church could remain open, so he was lowered in through a skylight. If a service was ever held on Christmas day it might be quite interesting for the Christmas show.
s the telegraph

 
eggshaped
68787.  Sat May 06, 2006 10:59 am Reply with quote

It seems that the old "postponing death until after Christmas" might be a myth. Come to think of it, it's not too surprising.

A study of 300,000 patients from Ohio failed to show any kind of peak after 'special days'.

Quote:
If the holidays have any effect on mortality at all, it is on those who die suddenly, with little time to hold on or let go. More people die abruptly of a heart attack on Christmas than on any other day.


Here is The American Heart Foundation's take on the study which shows that more people die of heart attacks around Christmas and New Year.

Quote:
“One possibility is that sick people tend to delay seeking medical care during the holidays. Another is that there are often changes in medical staff during the holidays and, as a result, the quality of care might be compromised.”

[a previous study] found about 33 percent more deaths occurred in December and January than in June through September, with deaths peaking on Jan. 1.


And here's a graph from the office of national statistics showing a peak in the UK around Christmas time.

 
Frederick The Monk
68856.  Sun May 07, 2006 1:38 pm Reply with quote

The pagan Viking bodyguards at the Byzantine court are reported to have celebrated Christmas by jumping up and down on the spot shouting 'Yol, yol, yol'.

This is the earliest description of pogoing I have so far encountered.

 
Frederick The Monk
68857.  Sun May 07, 2006 1:42 pm Reply with quote

Interestingly the Byzantine Viking bodyguards (Varangians) had their own patron saint - St Nicholas of Myra, or Santa as I like to call him.

 
Molly Cule
68888.  Sun May 07, 2006 4:14 pm Reply with quote

Rudolph is a bit of an odd name for a reindeer, the name means 'fame-wolf'. It comes from the Old High German name Hrodulf, a composition of hruod, meaning fame/glory and wolf.

 
Molly Cule
68890.  Sun May 07, 2006 4:19 pm Reply with quote

Kriss Kringle means baby Jesus, the origin of the name has nothing to do with Father Christmas. The words are from the German Christkindlein, Christkind'l "Christ child."

 

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