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Spud McLaren
1142755.  Sat Jul 25, 2015 5:22 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
And of course it is the given name for a charming, witty, intelligent and good-looking forummer... who may not come back.
Why, where are you going? ;-p
tets wrote:
Presumably the use of the word for 'stealing', 'arresting'(as in "You're nicked, my son") and prison are all intertwined.
Actually it's from lead-mining - you can find it under the "How to claim a disused mine" heading here.

 
tetsabb
1142770.  Sat Jul 25, 2015 6:43 am Reply with quote

I was, naturally, referring to another, i.e. witty,charming etc... I ain't goin' nowhere

 
14-11-2014
1143226.  Wed Jul 29, 2015 10:05 am Reply with quote

In Rotterdam there's a nickname tour. Landmarks often have at least one nickname. I don't know why nicknames are that popular in Rotterdam...

 
CharliesDragon
1143310.  Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:54 pm Reply with quote

Are we encouraged to suggest nicknames for that statue? In that case I'm gonna check how busy the naughty step is before engaging.

 
Zziggy
1143320.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 1:56 am Reply with quote

Nicknames, of course, have nothing to do with Nick, but are a consequence of saying "an ekename" lots of times fast. Unless I've just earned myself a klaxon there!

 
crissdee
1143321.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 2:24 am Reply with quote

CharliesDragon wrote:
Are we encouraged to suggest nicknames for that statue? In that case I'm gonna check how busy the naughty step is before engaging.


In the traditional manner of "Happy", "Sleepy" etc, I would suggest "Pluggy"


It's alright, I know the way😡

 
CharliesDragon
1143334.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 3:11 am Reply with quote

Zziggy wrote:
Nicknames, of course, have nothing to do with Nick, but are a consequence of saying "an ekename" lots of times fast. Unless I've just earned myself a klaxon there!


I do believe that is correct. Norse "økenavn" (or equalent), "an ekename," then "a neekname/nickname."

 
AlmondFacialBar
1143367.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 6:52 am Reply with quote

Going back to Old Nick, that's actually an old Saxon usage, as can be easily seen in the etymology of Pumpernickel bread. Proper Pumpernickel is a very heavy, moist, dark pure rye bread that has rather similar after effects to beans. The verb pumpern means to fart, and Nickel is the devil. Hence Pumpernickel is the devil that makes you fart.

Mmmmmm... Pumpernickel! (Provided you don't have any important social engagements in the immediate future)

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Zziggy
1143371.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 7:50 am Reply with quote

Ok, how about:

Where would you go to visit Santa Claus?

Klaxon: the north pole, Lapland, Turkey, ...

Answer: Italy.

St Nicholas, who became Santa Claus via the Dutch, was a Roman/Turkish bishop in the 4th century. He was also known as Nicholas the Wonderworker, due to a high number of miracles associated with his prayers.

When he died, his tomb in Myra (Turkey) became a place of pilgrimage for Christians until the late 11th century, when the Byzantine Empire lost Asia Minor to the Seljuk Turks. Worried about the possibility of not being able to access the relics, and tempted by the benefits of having their own pilgrimage site, sailors from Bari in Italy seized about half of the skeleton (over the protests of the Greek orthodox monks who held them) in 1087 and brought them back to Bari, where there is now both a Catholic and an Orthodox shrine.

The rest of the skeleton wasn't left for long, though: in the first crusade, sailors from Venice took the rest and set up a church on the Lido di Venezia to house them.

The two relic sets have been confirmed as belonging to the same person.

 
Zziggy
1143372.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 7:58 am Reply with quote

Wikipedia wrote:
Even with the allegedly continuing miracle of the manna, the archdiocese of Bari has allowed for one scientific survey of the bones. In the late 1950s, during a restoration of the chapel, it allowed a team of hand-picked scientists to photograph and measure the contents of the crypt grave.

In the summer of 2005, the report of these measurements was sent to a forensic laboratory in England. The review of the data revealed that the historical St. Nicholas was barely five feet in height and had a broken nose. The facial reconstruction was produced by Dr. Caroline Wilkinson at the University of Manchester and was shown on a BBC2 TV program 'The Real Face of Santa'.

 
14-11-2014
1143379.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 8:40 am Reply with quote

Zziggy wrote:
Nicknames, of course, have nothing to do with Nick, but are a consequence of saying "an ekename" lots of times fast. Unless I've just earned myself a klaxon there!

Mr. Fry has already explained what a nickname is, so no klaxon for a subject which had to be rejected anyway (QI S08E03).

The hardly known, official name of the statue of Paul McCarthy is Santa Claus, or perhaps Saint Nick.

FWIW: the most popular nickname of the statue has something to do with a plug and a butt, the name of the gnome. Another nickname is the dildogiant.

I think people in Paris destroyed another object of Paul McCarthy, which clearly represented a (Christmas) tree. It's a mystery why the French didn't like it.



Let's return to real Nicks and nicks, after this Christmas thread-drift...


Last edited by 14-11-2014 on Thu Jul 30, 2015 9:06 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Zziggy
1143382.  Thu Jul 30, 2015 9:00 am Reply with quote

St Nicholas did really exist.

 
14-11-2014
1213271.  Fri Nov 25, 2016 12:56 pm Reply with quote

A visit from Saint Nicholas, Clement Clark Moore, wrote:
Dasher and Dancer, Prancer and Vixen, Comet and Cupid, Donner and Blitzen

Q: What's the name of the horse of Saint Nicholas?

K: Amerigo, Slecht Weer Vandaag, nameless, no name, one name.

A: There's more than one horse and/or name, but there's one per country per year. Known names, fake and/or real, are Amerigo, Bianca, Bionda Majestuoso, Jasper, Juan, Majestuoso, Okki, Petra, Sasmona, Schimmel, and Slecht Weer Vandaag.

Amerigo is in use as a fantasy name since 2011, after a horse called Amerigo was retired. Flanders' Slecht Weer Vandaag was introduced as a constant name in 1992.

 
tetsabb
1213426.  Sat Nov 26, 2016 1:05 pm Reply with quote

14-11-2014 wrote:

Q: What's the name of the horse of Saint Nicholas?.


A Not Binky?

 
Spud McLaren
1213445.  Sat Nov 26, 2016 3:11 pm Reply with quote

I think you're mixing your non-corporeal visitors there, tets.

 

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