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2/6/15 recording quibble (spoilers!)

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Zziggy
1136959.  Wed Jun 10, 2015 7:13 am Reply with quote

Re: point 3:

Study Suggests Why Gut Instinct Works
Quote:
After conducting some unique memory and recognition tests, while also recording subjects' brain waves, scientists conclude that some gut feelings are not just guesswork after all. Rather, we access memories we aren't even aware we have.


Quick Decisions Might be the Best
Quote:
"This finding seems counter-intuitive,” said Li Zhaoping of the University College London, one of the authors of the study published online in the journal Current Biology. “You would expect people to make more accurate decisions when given the time to look properly. Instead they performed better when given almost no time to think.”

However ...

Deliberate Decisions are the Best
Quote:
When it comes to making life-changing decisions, neither snap judgments nor "sleeping on it" trump good old-fashioned conscious thought, new research suggests.

The finding contradicts research reported in 2006, which suggested unconscious thought is optimal for making complex decisions, including whether to buy a certain house or car. The 2006 findings, made by Dutch researchers and published in the journal Science, supported ideas of making quick decisions or leaving complex choices to the powers of unconscious thought.


So I guess the jury is still out? I suppose it might depend on the type of decision being made, and of course I might have just been working from outdated information. However, if I remember correctly, the example in the show was doing an exam, which I would say fits more with the first two reports saying that snap judgements work.

 
CharliesDragon
1136973.  Wed Jun 10, 2015 8:07 am Reply with quote

When it comes to buying a house or car, I'd say conscious thought is best if your gut doesn't have a particular feeling. If your gut says no, listen to it, there might be something you haven't consciously picked up on that would make you miserable over a long period.
I've experienced my gut feeling bubbling up to my conscious thought a lot of times and I go "Of course, that's why I feel that way! Why haven't I realised that before?"

As for snap judgements on exams, I have had times when I've gone against my initial feeling and been wrong, but I'm fairly sure the reverse has happened too, I've decided too quickly and been wrong.
When it comes to accessing information I had no idea I had, a few months ago my brain supplied me with the information that wilderbeests weigh about 150 kilos, zebras about 250, and the wildlife programme I was watching confirming it shortly after. (It was about lions hunting, something I watched a lot of growing up.)

I feel like gut feelings is a lighter version of "life flashing before your eyes," which we have at least one story of saving someone's life. I think it was mentioned on QI: A guy was on holiday and attacked by a shark, his life flashed before his eyes and managed to pick up a memory of his son watching a documentary about sharks and giving the advice of punching the shark in the nose/gills in the event of an attack, the guy did so and survived. He hadn't been watching the documentary, it had merely been background noise when the event of the memory took place, but his brain had still filed it away somewhere.

The problem might be where your brain has stored several answers to the same question. For example you've read a Snopes.com piece and your brain has made the myth more accessable than the busting of the myth, and your first reaction is to give the myth as fact. Or you remember the myth part of a General Ignorance question and not the correct answer. Part of that might be that you've learned the myth earlier and "lived" by it for a few times, embedded it deeper in your memory than something you've read or heard once.

In short, or brains are weird. :P

 
vanjeet
1137963.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 4:12 am Reply with quote

Zziggy wrote:
Just been to the recording of the mind/memory episode. It was fantastic, we had a great time


Golly, I'm envious!

Zziggy wrote:
1. It was stated by his Fryness that amnesia never affects old memories, and only ever affects new memories created since the accident causing the amnesia.


I'm wondering if what was being conveyed was that AA and RA (amnesia in all) do not affect old memories, in that RA only affects the mechanism by which one accesses old memories rather than the actual memories. That's what I think it might be. (The extent of my neurological knowledge is one bonk on the head bad, two bonks good.)

 
Zziggy
1137981.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 5:59 am Reply with quote

If my memory serves me right (ha!), the question was along the lines of "what would the man with amnesia say if you asked him his name?" And the answer was "his name, because amnesia doesn't delete old memories".

I did wonder if perhaps the point was meant to be that no amnesia would delete something as fundamental as your own name, but I'm not clued-up enough to know if even that would be correct.

 
CharliesDragon
1137983.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:13 am Reply with quote

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjaman_Kyle

Man with dissociative amnesia doesn't remember anything, includin his real last name, prior to 2004, when he was found in a parking lot.

 
Zziggy
1137984.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:18 am Reply with quote

Well there you have it!

Strange for the elves to get it this wrong (by which I mean, it doesn't seem to be a wording issue or a technicality or anything) ... I wonder whether it will make it into the final broadcast.

 
Spud McLaren
1138097.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 12:28 pm Reply with quote

vanjeet wrote:
[...] two bonks good.
Don't disagree, but can I have a rest inbetween?

 
suze
1138120.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 3:54 pm Reply with quote

Typical male ...

 
Spud McLaren
1138124.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 4:27 pm Reply with quote

Typical male 57 year old...

 
vanjeet
1138158.  Wed Jun 17, 2015 11:08 pm Reply with quote

Zziggy wrote:
"what would the man with amnesia say if you asked him his name?" And the answer was "his name, because amnesia doesn't delete old memories".


Yeah, that doesn't seem correct.

 
tetsabb
1140469.  Sun Jul 05, 2015 8:50 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
Typical male 57 year old...

Youngster...

 

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