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Embrace General Ignorance

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Gray
107195.  Thu Oct 26, 2006 4:47 am Reply with quote

Quote:
One of the interesting things about Newton's explanation of the rainbow spectrum is that it was actually wrong, in that he never incorporated waves into his model, and without waves you can't account for the supernumerary bow (the green/purple arc inside the main bow).

Newton was actually aware of a wave theory of light - it had been discovered by Christian Huygens some time previously - but he prefered to go with his 'corpuscular' method or particles, by which he still managed to explain prismatic splitting. So he never got to explain the supernumerary bow? Does he mention it in his notebooks and go 'bugger - what's this?' at any point?

 
Flash
107518.  Thu Oct 26, 2006 6:13 pm Reply with quote

Just ignored it, I believe.

 
Gray
107584.  Fri Oct 27, 2006 3:25 am Reply with quote

That's the way to do it!

 
did you know....
107613.  Fri Oct 27, 2006 4:44 am Reply with quote

i must if missed the episode about henry VIII, so did he have 6 wives or not?

 
dr.bob
107641.  Fri Oct 27, 2006 5:37 am Reply with quote

Buy the book and you'll find out! :)

 
Izzardesque
111519.  Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:24 pm Reply with quote

I'd be tempted to say that Henry VIII 'had' more than 6 wives!!! :P

 
Lumpo31
115741.  Sun Nov 12, 2006 10:56 am Reply with quote

Izzardesque wrote:
I'd be tempted to say that Henry VIII 'had' more than 6 wives!!! :P


Including Anne Boleyn's sister Mary. There's good reason to suspect that her son Henry was the illegitimate son of Henry VIII:
The affair was brief, ending in mid-1525 (probably July.) On 4 March 1526, Mary gave birth to a son, called Henry. He was widely assumed to be the king's son. He physically resembled the king, a fact often remarked upon. In 1535, for example, a man called 'young Master Carey' the king's son.
Quote:

Perhaps more telling, Henry granted the Careys actual manors and estates during the affair and immediately before the child's birth. Before, the Careys had been granted rather minor offices. (You may recall that Henry publicly acknowledged another illegitimate son, born in 1519. This boy was called Henry Fitzroy - the surname traditionally given to royal bastards - and was ennobled, given the title duke of Richmond. If Henry Carey was also his son, why didn't Henry do the same for him? The answer lies in his determination to divorce Katharine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn, the child's aunt. It is likely that even Henry VIII would have been too embarrassed to recognize his bastard son by his fiancee's younger sister.) Henry Carey was eventually ennobled as Lord Hunsdon by Elizabeth I, the queen who may have been his half-sister and was undoubtedly his cousin. Though he served her ably, Elizabeth only offered Hunsdon a title upon his deathbed. To this dubious honor, the old man aptly replied that if the queen hadn't thought him worth it while he was in health, he would not accept it while ill.

http://englishhistory.net/tudor/citizens/boleyn.html

Lisa

 
Felix
118879.  Tue Nov 21, 2006 7:05 am Reply with quote

Surely the colour in a rainbow is spectral, therefore the colours (or rather shades or hues of colour) are infinite.

 
Flash
118889.  Tue Nov 21, 2006 7:31 am Reply with quote

Quite so - but we're interested in the number of colours which people perceive, and how that number differs between cultures, and what that says about language and about the physiology of the eye and about ... oh, any number of things.

 
andymac
122902.  Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:56 pm Reply with quote

did you know.... wrote:
i must if missed the episode about henry VIII, so did he have 6 wives or not?


Well, according to the show, it was 3 or 4
Anne of Cleves was annulled, not divorced, meaning it was not legally a marriage.
The pope declared his marriage to Anne Boleyn to be void as he was still married to Catherine of Aragon (and since this was before Henry withdrew from Catholicism, Catholic law still applied in England).
The marriage to Catherine of Aragon was also declared invalid by the king himself, as she was previously married to his brother Arthur and it was unlawful to marry your brother's widow.
That's 3, but, since the marriage to Catherine was invalid, then the Pope's declaration would be wrong, as Henry was never really married to Catherine. So maybe 4.

Of course, if we're going the whole hog - biblically, which is supposedly what the law of the land was based on at the time, when a man and women unite in sex, they have formed one flesh, and are so married in the eyes of God. So every woman Henry slept with was his wife, causing him to have divorced the last one in God's eyes. So, any guesses? May well have been in triple figures, for all we know...

 
Stephanee
125102.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 3:15 pm Reply with quote

Was there a dreadful shortage of men at that time? I mean who in their right mind wanted to sleep with that particular gentleman? I just don't get it. Death seems preferrable. Did a girl absolutely have to marry that guy for alliance sake or could she at least negotiate, say yes I will marry him but live in my own castle with guards posted at the door to shoot him on sight if he brings his hideous self my way?
Argh, the life of women back then seems so hopeless and despairing.

 
Asta
125231.  Sat Dec 09, 2006 2:00 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Quite so - but we're interested in the number of colours which people perceive, and how that number differs between cultures


I always thought all the colors were legitimate except indigo, which was added in so the acronym Roy G. Biv would be a viable (and pronounceable) name.

 
Flash
125248.  Sat Dec 09, 2006 6:36 am Reply with quote

I love the idea that scientists should misrepresent phenomena so that they work better as acronyms. That must be how Pluto came to be regarded as a planet: "Hmmm ... My Very Easy Method Just Speeds Up Naming ... uh ... we need one that starts with a P".

 
The Mantis
131277.  Thu Jan 04, 2007 11:22 am Reply with quote

I was given the book by my son for Christmas (I suspect he wants to read it himself!) and have enjoyed it.
Nice to see the book practicing what it preaches (general ignorance) by mixing up England/English and Britain/British on pp 115 and 231!
To those of us who live in other parts of the UK, there is actually a difference....

 
Eishkimojo
131926.  Sat Jan 06, 2007 7:17 pm Reply with quote

Stephanee wrote:
Was there a dreadful shortage of men at that time? I mean who in their right mind wanted to sleep with that particular gentleman? I just don't get it. Death seems preferrable. Did a girl absolutely have to marry that guy for alliance sake or could she at least negotiate, say yes I will marry him but live in my own castle with guards posted at the door to shoot him on sight if he brings his hideous self my way?
Argh, the life of women back then seems so hopeless and despairing.


I wouldn't knock it. I guess he was considered very virile in his day. Plus he was a king. I guess back then, status could make up for a miserable marriage.

 

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