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Embrace General Ignorance

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Andrew
75306.  Sat Jun 17, 2006 5:20 pm Reply with quote

Glad I wasn't the only one ;) I guess we'll have to buy the book to find out...

 
Paraoptomistic
82203.  Thu Jul 27, 2006 11:22 am Reply with quote

Quote:
75305. Sat Jun 17, 2006 10:19 pm

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So just how many wives did Henry have???


Um wasn't it 3 or 4 depending on whether you believed Henry's version, or the Pope's?

 
barbados
83872.  Sat Aug 05, 2006 8:23 am Reply with quote

greenstreaks wrote:
So just how many wives did Henry have???

I thought everybody knew it was 6


It depends on your veiwpoint but it's anything from just the two upwards

 
Quaintly Ignorant
84206.  Mon Aug 07, 2006 8:27 am Reply with quote

It gave me a smug sense of satisfaction when the very question of the number of Henry's wives came up on a pub quiz machine, I answered correctly that it was six but then I got to turn to my friend and say: "actually it was two, three or four but the poor machine isn't to know that"


Well.. I found it amusing.

 
Andrew
84274.  Mon Aug 07, 2006 12:32 pm Reply with quote

lol

 
grizzly
84288.  Mon Aug 07, 2006 1:49 pm Reply with quote

IF the question were "How many times did Henry VIII get married?" would the answer be 6 (since the reason that it would be 4 is that 2 were annuled)?

 
suze
84304.  Mon Aug 07, 2006 3:19 pm Reply with quote

Arguably. But the Catholic Church's position is that a marriage which is annulled is regarded as never having taken place, so arguably not.

If your phrase it as "how many wedding ceremonies did he have", then the answer would probably be six. Except that on at least one occasion - quite possibly three - he knew that the marriage was invalid all along, and therefore can't really be said to have gone through a wedding ceremony.

One way or another, I think we have "proved" that every number between nought and six is in some way or other a valid answer ...

 
Snoogans
84394.  Tue Aug 08, 2006 3:39 am Reply with quote

What about the old chestnut "Seven colours of the rainbow"? This has bothered me since I was a sprog, 'cos I've only ever been able to make out six distinct evenly sized bands.
I recently found out that I'd been right all along - Isaac Newton and his contemporaries, while regarded as Scientists, were still very much alchemists and mystics at heart. It turns out that, having split white light into bands of colour, they decided that six didn't really fit into their great scheme of things. Hence, they decided to squeeze in this spurious "Indigo" between blue and violet, a bring the total to a much more satisfactory and suitably mystical seven.

 
grizzly
84398.  Tue Aug 08, 2006 3:51 am Reply with quote

Snoogans wrote:
What about the old chestnut "Seven colours of the rainbow"? This has bothered me since I was a sprog, 'cos I've only ever been able to make out six distinct evenly sized bands.
I recently found out that I'd been right all along - Isaac Newton and his contemporaries, while regarded as Scientists, were still very much alchemists and mystics at heart. It turns out that, having split white light into bands of colour, they decided that six didn't really fit into their great scheme of things. Hence, they decided to squeeze in this spurious "Indigo" between blue and violet, a bring the total to a much more satisfactory and suitably mystical seven.


I've heard this before but I do wonder how much documentary evidence there is to back it up.

 
Flash
84474.  Tue Aug 08, 2006 7:54 am Reply with quote

The assertion is based on a lecture he gave on the “harmonies of colours” in 1669, when he suggested that the rainbow could be regarded as having seven colours on the basis that colours are “perhaps analagous to the concordances of sound”. So he proposed the colours orange and indigo in addition to the then prevalent five to match the number of tones in the ancient Greek musical scale.

 
Celebaelin
84570.  Tue Aug 08, 2006 12:14 pm Reply with quote

The rainbow contains all the wavelengths into which the incident sunlight can be divided so all the colours represented by single wavelengths which are visible to the human eye are present (and some wavelengths which aren't visible like IR and UV).

There is a distinction made between two forms of colour which was first made by James Clerk Maxwell.

Quote:
1. "Spectral color," i.e. the colors of the rainbow and their combinations. The amount which each part of the rainbow spectrum contributes to a beam of light can be determined by splitting the beam with a prism.

2. "Perceived color" reported by the human eye to the brain.


Quote:
In light emitted from solids, liquids or extensive bodies of dense gas such as the Sun, the colors are distributed continuously. Their exact distribution ("black body spectrum") depends on the temperature at which it is produced--a warm hand radiates mostly in the infra-red, a glowing bar of iron is cherry-red, a lightbulb filament is bright yellow, and sunlight is white-hot.

http://www.phy6.org/stargaze/Sun4spec.htm

Quote:
Solar radiation is radiant energy emitted by the sun, particularly electromagnetic energy. About half of the radiation is in the visible short-wave part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The other half is mostly in the near-infrared part, with some in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum [1]. The portion of this ultraviolet radiation that is not absorbed by the atmosphere produces a suntan or a sunburn on people who have been in sunlight for extended periods of time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_radiation



I must say that I find the green part of the traditional ROYGBIV in a rainbow difficult to see/distinuish from the blue though, on the other hand the yellow is a lot easier to make out than the diagram suggests. This is about the best image I could find.

 
grizzly
84585.  Tue Aug 08, 2006 1:11 pm Reply with quote

The inability to see the blue/green/purple part of a rainbow is more likely down to the fact that you'll be seeing it against a blue (or dark grey) background.

 
Flash
84605.  Tue Aug 08, 2006 1:38 pm Reply with quote

One of the interesting things about Newton's explanation of the rainbow spectrum is that it was actually wrong, in that he never incorporated waves into his model, and without waves you can't account for the supernumerary bow (the green/purple arc inside the main bow).

 
grizzly
85528.  Sat Aug 12, 2006 3:22 am Reply with quote

BTW I'm glad to see a release date and a front cover for the book.

 
kanie
93852.  Sat Sep 16, 2006 2:48 pm Reply with quote

greenstreaks wrote:
So just how many wives did Henry have???

I thought everybody knew it was 6


5 - didn't he get married to one of them twice?

 

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