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The food of love

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Frances
7474.  Fri Jun 04, 2004 6:51 am Reply with quote

A clootie Dumpling is a dumpling boiled in a cloot, or cloth. Jenny's site recipe is okay, I suppose, but if you want a good one here it is;

Set a large pot to boil, half full of water, plate upside down in bottom.
Measure out 1 lb SR flour, 1oz [or more] mixed spice, 1/2 teasp cinnamon, 4 oz suet, 1 cup sugar, 3/4 lb washed and dried dried fruit [mixed peel included if you like it]. Mix to stickiness with milk and water [more water than milk].
Scald a large cloth [an opened-up cotton pillowcase is fine], spread it on a counter top and coat the centre 18" circle with flour till your hand comes off it dry. Dump the mix on, draw up cloth and tie tightly with string, leaving about a finger's width of space above the dollop of mix to let it swell or it'll turn out like cement, but not more or the water will get in and it'll be slurry. [This is the tricky bit!] Leave a long loop of string to lift it out with.
Lower into boiling water, cover. Boil steadily for 3 hours. Don't let it dry out.
Lift out, open, turn onto a plate. Pop it in a medium oven or in front of an open fire to dry off the floury surface; when it feels just dry and firm to the touch, it's done. Slice and enjoy!

 
raindancer
7476.  Fri Jun 04, 2004 9:22 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Frances' husband makes the world's best clootie dumplings. At any rate, I've never tasted better ones, though to be fair I've never eaten any made by anybody else.


You'll forgive a grin over that!

Jenny and Frances.

I'm sure they're delicious, but it seems a bit of a palaver to me, what with pillow-cases and what-not. Might have to wait till the next trip to Scotland!

The Scots do have this thing about wrapping things up in cloth, tying them with string and boiling them for hours and hours, don't they! But I do like haggis...

 
raindancer
7477.  Fri Jun 04, 2004 6:12 pm Reply with quote

Thought you'd like to know. I tried a Google Images search on Clootie Dumplings, and got them in little packets tied up with ribbons!

Ah well. Reminds me of the Little Prince's sheep-in-a-box!

 
Frances
7487.  Sat Jun 05, 2004 7:01 am Reply with quote

Yes, raindancer, it is a palaver, but worth it. We have fivesets of friends and neighbours always slavering for a quarter - which means Alex always has to make two.

But - forgive me if I've picked you up wrong - a haggis is not boiled in a cloth. It's a mixture of one part minced umbles and all the internal bits of a sheep a provident housewife can't find any other use for, with one part onions and two parts oatmeal, salted and peppered, stuffed into the sheep's stomach [or other similar receptacle] and cooked gently. Sassenachs go Yeugh!, but it's actually spicy and delicious. Better than Cumberland sausage, which is made in much the same way, though with a higher proportion of meat. Any haggis in a tin or plastic skin or bowl is ersatz, however tasty, though better for exporting - the Customs in some countries are so picky!

 
raindancer
7493.  Sat Jun 05, 2004 5:01 pm Reply with quote

Frances

Absolutely right. Sheep's stomach, I forgot. Nice, though. I was up in Sterling last year, and had some there. Yum!

 
Flash
7495.  Sat Jun 05, 2004 6:11 pm Reply with quote

In Devon we had a thing called Hog's Pudding which I guess is comparable, though sausage-shaped - I think it's bits of pig mixed with oats and stuffed into a tube of gut. Nicer than it sounds, especially when taken with laver, a seaweed which the Welsh call lavabread. There was a time when that was my breakfast every morning, rain or shine. Which is why I'm now such a strapping fellow.

 
raindancer
7499.  Sat Jun 05, 2004 9:36 pm Reply with quote

And then, of course, there's...

a REAL cornish pasty, all alone on the plate, cooked to perfection.

 
Frances
7503.  Sun Jun 06, 2004 7:21 am Reply with quote

But wasn't a Cornish Pasty invented to be thrown down a mine shaft to hungry miners without smashing to bits? So, to be cooked to perfection, it would have to be tough as a brick.

 
Flash
7505.  Sun Jun 06, 2004 4:30 pm Reply with quote

Does anyone have a good word to say about Scotch Eggs? Because, if so, I'll fight them if they're up for it.

 
raindancer
7509.  Sun Jun 06, 2004 6:08 pm Reply with quote

Nothing wrong with scotch eggs (that a good fart won't cure). I like 'em!

Does anyone know where to get JUNKET in the UK?

 
raindancer
7510.  Sun Jun 06, 2004 6:14 pm Reply with quote

Frances

I didn't really know about cornish pasties till I went round to my friend Keith's. He's from Cornwall. One day he said 'Right, that's it! I've had enough of all the second rate junk that passes for pasties. I'll show you what a real pasty tastes like'.

He spent HOURS in the kitchen doing this and that, and then produced three delectable pasties. 'It's all in the gravy' he said, 'that and slow cooking'. He, me and his wife had them with a little salad and an impressive Shiraz.

I'm a convert.

 
raindancer
7511.  Sun Jun 06, 2004 6:16 pm Reply with quote

Anyone know where in the UK I can get JUNKET?

(I already put this on page 3, which is now invisible!).

 
Frances
7520.  Mon Jun 07, 2004 12:20 pm Reply with quote

Why not make your own, raindancer? Get some rennet from a health food store; warm a pint of milk [yes, okay, this is my grandmother's recipe, which makes it practically antediluvian, but it's still delish] with sugar and flavouring essence to taste, till the sugar is dissolved and the milk is about blood heat, no warmer - don't boil it! Add a teaspoonful of rennet, stir, leave in a cool place to set. If you've used too much rennet it'll be a bit sour, so use less next time; if you haven't used enough it won't set, so - you guessed it - use more.

Yes, I'm a bung-it cook.

 
raindancer
7521.  Mon Jun 07, 2004 4:10 pm Reply with quote

Frances

I might have to resort to actually cooking something, but what happened to the little packets?

 
Frances
7534.  Wed Jun 09, 2004 10:43 am Reply with quote

Raindancer -

Dunno. They were useful, though, with flavouring and everything included. Just gone out of fashion, I suppose. Everybody's into Viennettas or something.

 

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