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Poor English in the media

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cornixt
1385912.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 9:06 am Reply with quote

Took me three parses before I stumbled upon the intended meaning of the following BBC News headline: Shooting rocks restaurant not far from White House.

If you're in DC, Shooting Rocks is a great restaurant for tourists. Or maybe there is a restaurant where you can shoot at rocks.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1385914.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 9:25 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Not really the media, but so annoying I could not let it slide. Typing up an email, and I was offered the following "correction" of my English;



Seriously???? you want me to replace perfectly good English with some bastardised slang from the colonies? Not on my watch....


Only got to is already bastardised slang from the colonies and so your spellchecker only suggested you go the whole nine yards with it. Makes sense to me.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
crissdee
1385941.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 2:07 pm Reply with quote

Not in that context. I was asking what other stock he had to make up my order into something worth travelling to the Post Office with, so "gotta make" would be horribly wrong.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1385944.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 2:15 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Not in that context. I was asking what other stock he had to make up my order into something worth travelling to the Post Office with, so "gotta make" would be horribly wrong.


Ah OK, fair enough! Predictive text saw a string there, but no context.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
crissdee
1387279.  Wed Aug 11, 2021 1:39 pm Reply with quote



Proofreading people! Proofreading.....

 
Brock
1387427.  Fri Aug 13, 2021 4:12 am Reply with quote

Has anyone else noticed the creeping use of "reticent" to mean "reluctant"? I've heard it a few times now on the radio, but I think this is the first time I've seen it in print:

"Of course it was understandable people were so reticent to leave the house during the dog days of lockdown" (Daily Mail editorial, quoted in the "i" newspaper)

The only meaning given in the COED is "not revealing one's thoughts or feelings readily", and other mainstream British dictionaries concur, although Merriam-Webster has the following article:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/can-reticent-mean-reluctant

Maybe another American import, then?

 
Brock
1387498.  Sat Aug 14, 2021 12:51 am Reply with quote

Another one from Chloe Tilley on Times Radio:

"If you're at home and a little bit reticent about going back to the office..."

To me that would mean that you're going back to the office and you don't want to talk about it, but it's clear that she meant that you're not keen on going back to the office in the first place. Has this usage crept up recently, or have I only just noticed it?

 
suze
1387499.  Sat Aug 14, 2021 2:02 am Reply with quote

It may well be the latter thing, because I hadn't noticed it until you mentioned it.

I shall now listen out for it.

 
filofax
1388813.  Fri Sep 03, 2021 5:17 am Reply with quote

Quote from BBC:

"At this point she was heckled by Ms White, and although the exact words were not picked up by microphones in the parliamentary chamber the newly-elected MSP is reported to have said "except if you're English" - or words to that effect - apparently inferring that Ms Sturgeon was anti-English."


Inferring? INFERRING?

 
tetsabb
1389387.  Thu Sep 09, 2021 9:51 am Reply with quote

Does anyone understand this? New technology coming to a control room near me
Quote:
Enhance levels of cyclical baseline servicing to maintain the assets material condition.

 
ali
1389393.  Thu Sep 09, 2021 10:22 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
Does anyone understand this? New technology coming to a control room near me
Quote:
Enhance levels of cyclical baseline servicing to maintain the assets material condition.


I think it means they're going to do regular maintainance on stuff rather than waiting for it to go wrong. (and I think "assets" needs an apostrophe)

 
PDR
1389403.  Thu Sep 09, 2021 11:12 am Reply with quote

It means moving the emphasis from on-condition maintenance (fix it when it breaks) to scheduled maintenance (fix it whether it's broken or not in the wholly fallacious belief that the adage "prevention is better than cure" is a universal truth).

I could do (and have done) a two-day course on this at the drop of a hat without notes - the default assumption should always be an "on condition" maintenance policy, using the Reliability-Centred-Maintenance (RCM) process to analyse and identify where there might be a justifiable case for introducing scheduled maintenance.

The short version is:
1. Scheduled maintenance disturbs serviceable equipment and in the process often renders it unserviceable (aka "maintenance-induced failure")

2. Scheduled Maintenance replaces parts that are still serviceable, ensuring you never get the full life of an asset (increased cost) and in the process often creates a premature obsolescence problem

3. Scheduled Maintenance creates system downtimes and service interruptions that constrain system availability and/or interrupt the mission for no justifiable reason.

4. Scheduled Maintenance is only justifiable where there is an unobservable failure mode which results in an unacceptable safety or economic consequence which cannot be viably eliminated at the design stage.

At my usual rates that should be 2,500(+VAT) per course delegate please.

PDR

 
crissdee
1389422.  Thu Sep 09, 2021 5:16 pm Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
Scheduled maintenance disturbs serviceable equipment and in the process often renders it unserviceable (aka "maintenance-induced failure")


The story of my life when I worked for the ticket machine company!

The original machines we installed when I first started were ok. They had been in service long enough for all the bugs to be worked out of them. The newer ones they introduced were rushed into service for various reasons, none of which were good. They had more bugs than an anthill and ran on a knife-edge of functionality. We hardly dared touch them unless absolutely necessary in case we unsettled something while fixing something else.

 
extremophilesheep
1389571.  Sun Sep 12, 2021 2:42 am Reply with quote

So a bit like how our IT department always does massive maintenance or updates on the busiest day of the week....is there some sort of sciency law for this phenomenon?

 
Awitt
1389586.  Sun Sep 12, 2021 5:03 am Reply with quote

Reminds me of what happened in the September school holidays of 2019 when I was working at the school library - major IT upgrades, the tech guys on site during the holidays.

We return to discover all documents in the staff drive are gone, been wiped.
Tech tells me later that week that what had happened was another server in the back of the library, somehow turned itself on when it should have been 'asleep', dormant.

So much for technology making our lives simpler.

A casual teacher who'd come in when needed during staff absences, offered to work full time for the next two weeks on getting all items back for the annual magazine - by asking staff to send through photos/documents again, if they had them.

I also remember the library computer lost all documents/templates of overdue books/letters sent to parents in this incident.

 

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