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Poor English in the media

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ali
1395580.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 6:50 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:


That paragraph is remarkably similar to a paragraph in Ms Lane's article on Wikipedia. Which copied from which, I regret that I cba to work out right now. At least the article tells us that the Bon Marché where Ms Lane worked was akin to Grace Brothers. Wikipedia has it that it was the present day retail chain of that name which specialises in clothing for the older woman, which would be remarkable since said chain didn't exist until 1985.


I can't speak for Liverpool, but there was a Bon Marché (pronounced 'bonmarsh' [bɔn'mɑɹʃ]) department store (later Debenhams, now closed) in Gloucester in the 1970s. How it relates to the modern chain of the same name, I don't know.

 
suze
1395581.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 7:55 pm Reply with quote

It doesn't, as far as I can tell.

The chain spells itself as one word, and was started by a guy named Parkash Singh Chima (1922-2010) in Yorkshire in the early 80s. It appears to have no connexion to departmental stores in Gloucester, Liverpool, or elsewhere.

Whether the Gloucester and Liverpool stores were connected to one another I don't know.

 
crissdee
1395714.  Sat Nov 20, 2021 6:17 am Reply with quote



AAAAARRRRGGGGHHHHH!!!!!

Also on FB, someone who "borrowed a trailer to someone" and hasn't had it returned.....

What time does the next ship leave Earth?

 
cnb
1395729.  Sat Nov 20, 2021 10:12 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Whether the Gloucester and Liverpool stores were connected to one another I don't know.


They were not. Neither were either of them connected to any of the many other department stores around the world called Bon Marche. The Liverpool store was bough by and merged into John Lewis in the 60s, and the Gloucester one bought by Debenhams in the 70s.

 
Brock
1396055.  Wed Nov 24, 2021 5:58 am Reply with quote

Not actually poor English, but I don't think we have a thread for "Statements of the Bleeding Obvious":

"Liz Kendall, the shadow social care minister, has announced that she will be taking maternity leave next year because she is having a baby."

(From the Guardian's live politics blog)

 
PDR
1396067.  Wed Nov 24, 2021 7:02 am Reply with quote

She might have been taking maternity leave because her partner was having a baby. Having had several staff doing both over the years it's my observation that "shared parental leave" and "adoption leave" are also often referred to as "maternity/paternity Leave" because it's a term people understand and people may not to disclose to colleagues that they are adopting.

PDR

 
Brock
1396071.  Wed Nov 24, 2021 7:21 am Reply with quote

Actually she's having a child via a surrogate mother. (I wasn't aware of this when I made the above post.)

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2021/nov/24/labour-liz-kendall-having-baby-surrogacy

 
PDR
1396074.  Wed Nov 24, 2021 8:32 am Reply with quote

So actually she's NOT having a baby - she's just becoming a parent.

PDR

 
crissdee
1396081.  Wed Nov 24, 2021 8:45 am Reply with quote

A selection of the lowlights from printed matter that fell on the WYEBODDA doormat.







The last two were from a 114 page glossy catalogue, which presumably cost a fair amount of money to get printed.....

 
Brock
1396090.  Wed Nov 24, 2021 9:22 am Reply with quote

"Make a promis" is undoubtedly not normal English spelling, but the leaflet comes from a company called "Promis Life" and the name of the policy is indeed the "Funeral Protection Promis". The website address appears to be correct as well:

https://promislife.co.uk/funeral-protection/

Many companies use deliberate misspellings in their brand names, so I'm not sure why you've drawn attention to this particular one. I suppose "Make a Promis" would have been clearer, though.

(Unless it's a sneaky way of pretending to make a promise without actually making one. If they didn't honour their "promis", would it be a valid defence to say "it's not a promise - we were just promoting our brand name"? I'm not a lawyer, but I suspect not.)

 
suze
1396135.  Wed Nov 24, 2021 1:27 pm Reply with quote

While I am sure that no company would ever be so cynical, if it actually wanted to hide behind "That's just our brand name and it doesn't mean promise" it would probably do better to spell it with an upper case <P>. Is the name supposed to be pronounced "pro-MEE", as in the part participle of the fiendishly irregular French verb promettre (to promise)?

That product is a fairly odd beast anyway, and I'm not really sure who is the target market. The advertising suggests that you might buy this product in order to pay for your funeral, but while funeral plans absolutely do exist and are offered by a number of providers, this isn't one.

In fact, it's a bog standard life assurance offered by a company which turns out to be an arm of Schweizerische Rückversicherungs-Gesellschaft ("Swiss Re"). It's designed to be cheep and chearful - no surrender value, no underwriting, and a maximum sum assured of £20,000 - on which basis I doubt they'll be advertising it in the Quality Sundays. In the middle of Countdown, maybe. Swiss Re has not traditionally involved inself in the lower end of this market, so it must be confident that this is a cash cow or it wouldn't be doing it.

As always, consult an Independent Financial Advisor.

 
tetsabb
1396559.  Sun Nov 28, 2021 9:01 am Reply with quote

I had to ring someone to do with motorway infrastructure that was the casualty of an errant driver.
"We have bamaged darrier " I said
My interlocutor understood exactly what i meant.

 
ali
1396560.  Sun Nov 28, 2021 9:16 am Reply with quote

tetsabb wrote:
I had to ring someone to do with motorway infrastructure that was the casualty of an errant driver.
"We have bamaged darrier " I said
My interlocutor understood exactly what i meant.


My mother's good at that.
I was doing some cooking, and wanted an ingredient I couldn't remember the name of, so I asked her where she kept the "Mongolian Juju Beans". She pointed at a high cupboard wherein were indeed some Goji Berries, which was exactly what I wanted.

 
Brock
1397144.  Fri Dec 03, 2021 4:51 am Reply with quote

I don't know whether this is poor use of English or just a failure of my understanding.

"In the third clash of their world championship match in Dubai, champion Magnus Carlsen and challenger Ian Nepomniachtchi played what supercomputers said was the most accurate game in the history of chess on Sunday" - today's i.

What does "accurate" mean in this context? The dictionary gives two definitions: "correct in all details" and "capable of or successful in reaching the intended target". Any game of chess between two professionals will presumably be correct in all details, and the other definition isn't relevant here. I read through the rest of the article but no explanation was given.

 
Leith
1397178.  Fri Dec 03, 2021 8:44 am Reply with quote

There appears to be a concept in chess of a "perfect" or optimal strategy (these days determined by computer analysis), where "accuracy" is a measure of how much or how little a player's moves deviate from that strategy:
https://www.chess.com/forum/view/general/what-does-accuracy-mean

It sounds like the article is using the term in this technical sense while failing to make clear that it is doing so.

 

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