View previous topic | View next topic

Poor English in the media

Page 123 of 127
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127  Next

Alexander Howard
1395364.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 9:41 am Reply with quote

Ah, well when you were having lunch in Avebury, I was in Brecon at the Manual Eating of the Spoonerism Society, held at the Quaker Heating Mouse.

We had sand hamwiches in the Lead Ryan; pity it's close to the Balmy Arricks so we moved over to the Hocks and Founds. I skipped out before their evening entertainment in the Boar's Head.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1395370.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 9:52 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Three from today.

In Llandrindod Wells;



Not seen that one before!

From the Brecon and Radnor Express;


Used Suzuki's what?


*sob*

Meanwhile a couple of years back I ordered something from a smalltime crystal maker in Waterford (as opposed to Waterford Crystal - all these guys are ex-employees who set up shop on their own when manufacturing was moved to China) and the subject of the auto reply said "Thank's for your order". The product was all I'd expect and more, but that apostrophe still makes me shudder.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
1395382.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 10:31 am Reply with quote

Brock wrote:
Wiktionary lists one of the uses of "-age" as "forming nouns of a unit of measure", giving the following examples (though I admit I'd never heard of the last one):

volt + ‎-age → ‎voltage
‎foot + ‎-age → ‎footage
‎tonne + ‎-age → ‎tonnage
‎hour + ‎-age → ‎hourage

There are also others in use like "poundage" and "mileage".

I suppose it comes down to whether you believe the suffix "-age" can be added to the name of any unit in this fashion, or only some specific ones. I can't say I've ever heard "metr(e)age" or "litr(e)age" or "inchage" or "ounceage".


Personally I hold the schools responsible - I suspect the shortfall in knowage is not unrelated to the prevailing vacationage.

(sheds footage and rapidly accrues yardage)

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
1395384.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 10:40 am Reply with quote

*shudders and recommends metricage*

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
1395390.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 10:59 am Reply with quote

Shudderage noted.

[I was tempted to respond with "Da only shudder I is wantin' to see from you is when you shudder yo mouth!", but some around here might see it as a genuine insult rather than opportunistic banterage]

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
1395398.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 11:24 am Reply with quote

Also, rusty knives applied to some body parts can cause quite some painage I believe...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
PDR
1395419.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 12:40 pm Reply with quote

Rusty Knives - wasn't he the drummer in Arcane Emetic's punk-romance tribute album "A dyspeptic sound of chunder"?

PDR

 
suze
1395420.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 12:46 pm Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
knowage


The proper word for knowage is of course knowledge, and it did arise as an -age form!

Well, sort of, probably. Most dictionaries have it that the second part of the word knowledge is "of obscure origin", and point tentatively at an Old English suffix -laec meaning something like "the process of". The letter <c> at the end of an OE word was prounounced /tʃ/ ie like the sound spelled <ch> in Modern English, so we're not a million miles away from -age territory!

There weren't all that many -laec words in OE. About a dozen are known, of which only knowledge (cnawlece) and wedlock (wedlaec) are still in use. Others like feohtlac ("fightage" ie war) have disappeared.

Back in Chaucer's time, there was also a verb knoulechen ("to knowledge"). Its main meaning was in the Biblical sense, in sentences like "Didst thou knowledge mine wife, thou cur?".

 
Brock
1395565.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 2:38 pm Reply with quote

This sentence from an article about Carla Lane, the late TV scriptwriter, got me thinking:

Quote:
A poor performer at school (though noted in one report for her "keen sense of humour"), she spent her teens drinking-in the atmosphere of 1940s Liverpool...


While the hyphen between "drinking" and "in" is undoubtedly incorrect, omitting it might make it look as though Ms Lane spent her teenage years in the pub. Can anyone think of a way round this?

 
bobwilson
1395571.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 3:50 pm Reply with quote

Brock wrote:
This sentence from an article about Carla Lane, the late TV scriptwriter, got me thinking:

Quote:
A poor performer at school (though noted in one report for her "keen sense of humour"), she spent her teens drinking-in the atmosphere of 1940s Liverpool...


While the hyphen between "drinking" and "in" is undoubtedly incorrect, omitting it might make it look as though Ms Lane spent her teenage years in the pub. Can anyone think of a way round this?


imbibing

 
Brock
1395573.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 4:06 pm Reply with quote

Very good!

 
PDR
1395574.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 4:10 pm Reply with quote

Absorbing, basking in, soaking up etc

(pseudo-thesaurage while you wait)

PDR

 
suze
1395576.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 4:59 pm Reply with quote

It's just not a very good sentence.

The article has already told us that Ms Lane was born in Liverpool in 1928, so the revelation that she spent her teenaged years in the Liverpool of the 1940s is not a startling one.

We could probably have figured that much out for ourselves, but most of us don't know what "the atmosphere of 1940s Liverpool" actually was. The writer would have done better to tell us about the relevant aspects of it, but instead he just tells us that a woman from Liverpool spent her teenaged years experiencing Liverpool as it was in her teenaged years.

That paragraph is remarkably similar to a paragraph in Ms Lane's article on Wikipedia. Which copied from which, I regret that I cba to work out right now. At least the article tells us that the Bon Marché where Ms Lane worked was akin to Grace Brothers. Wikipedia has it that it was the present day retail chain of that name which specialises in clothing for the older woman, which would be remarkable since said chain didn't exist until 1985.

 
PDR
1395577.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 5:27 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:

We could probably have figured that much out for ourselves, but most of us don't know what "the atmosphere of 1940s Liverpool" actually was.


Roughly 80% nitrogen, 20% oxygen with some traces of carbon dioxide and other inert gases water vapour typically at a pressure of around 1013.2mbar. Surely this isn't really unknown?

PDR

 
AlmondFacialBar
1395578.  Thu Nov 18, 2021 5:32 pm Reply with quote

A fair amount of explosives in the air for a while, too, I've been lead to believe.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 

Page 123 of 127
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group