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Poor English in the media

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Brock
1394877.  Sat Nov 13, 2021 4:42 am Reply with quote

Wiktionary lists one of the uses of "-age" as "forming nouns of a unit of measure", giving the following examples (though I admit I'd never heard of the last one):

volt + ‎-age → ‎voltage
‎foot + ‎-age → ‎footage
‎tonne + ‎-age → ‎tonnage
‎hour + ‎-age → ‎hourage

There are also others in use like "poundage" and "mileage".

I suppose it comes down to whether you believe the suffix "-age" can be added to the name of any unit in this fashion, or only some specific ones. I can't say I've ever heard "metr(e)age" or "litr(e)age" or "inchage" or "ounceage".

 
crissdee
1394879.  Sat Nov 13, 2021 4:50 am Reply with quote

Definitely heard of meterage, but my spellchecker doesn't seem to recognise it. I heard it used constantly when I worked for the flooring company and in the timber yard.

 
Awitt
1394881.  Sat Nov 13, 2021 5:07 am Reply with quote

Footage is now largely used to refer to the media.

 
cornixt
1395099.  Mon Nov 15, 2021 11:19 am Reply with quote

When we have a power outage, we all wait for the inage.

 
suze
1395124.  Mon Nov 15, 2021 12:49 pm Reply with quote

Yardage is used quite a bit in golf and American football, and apparently also in sailing.

I'm not actually sure whether postal orders still exist, but a postal order used to cost more than its face value. The difference - a service charge - was called the poundage. (The pound here being money rather than weight, of course.)


The good husband tells me of the existence of a cricketist called Geoff Humpage, a rather rotund gentleman who played a few times for England forty or so years ago.

The success or otherwise of a hot date could apparently be measured in humpage. Well, it could if you were a young man who played cricket in that era, anyway.

 
Awitt
1395159.  Tue Nov 16, 2021 6:00 am Reply with quote

Not the media but an individual on Facebook again, with excersize. Spelling it that way all the time so that must be how they think it's spelt.

 
suze
1395242.  Tue Nov 16, 2021 1:13 pm Reply with quote

That reminds me of NinOfEden and scince (for since, not science).

Nin wasn't stupid, and I always supposed that she did it on purpose rather than actually believing it to be correct - and I certainly can't cast the first stone here, what with my preference for scarey. (That spelling is in Webster's, but is generally considered archaic. I don't care; to me it's etymologucally preferable.)

 
Brock
1395249.  Tue Nov 16, 2021 1:43 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
That reminds me of NinOfEden and scince (for since, not science).


I once had a science teacher who consistently wrote prescence for presence, and expected the class to copy his spelling mistake. (I refused, of course.)

Quote:
Nin wasn't stupid, and I always supposed that she did it on purpose rather than actually believing it to be correct - and I certainly can't cast the first stone here, what with my preference for scarey. (That spelling is in Webster's, but is generally considered archaic. I don't care; to me it's etymologucally preferable.)


Doesn't it just follow the same spelling rule as most other adjectives in -y from nouns in mute -e? (Shaky, slimy, smoky etc.)

 
suze
1395250.  Tue Nov 16, 2021 2:04 pm Reply with quote

Yes, and in every case you'll find that the version with an <e> gets a non-zero amount of use, but is considered archaic, eccentric, or both. Smokey is probably more common than any of the others, and Mr Pringle (ie Kellogg's) does use this spelling for his ~ bacon potato-based snacks. Mr Walker (ie PepsiCo) and Mr G Wonder (who is owned by a family firm based in Northern Ireland) go with smoky.

(At this point the good husband wanted to know what ever happened to the crisps of Mr Smith. It turns out that he sold out to Mr Walker and hence PepsiCo in 1989. The Smith's name is still used in Australia, and also for a budget Walker's self-clone brand currently sold only in Poundland.)


The derogatory word for an English person is always limey, though.

 
crissdee
1395257.  Tue Nov 16, 2021 3:11 pm Reply with quote

I have mentioned before the manager at the timber yard where I worked, who would consistently write "lenght" instead of "length".

 
Jenny
1395271.  Tue Nov 16, 2021 6:00 pm Reply with quote

If I had a penny for every time I have seen etcetera abbreviated as ect, I'd have at least enough for a decent dinner out.

 
Brock
1395291.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 3:44 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
If I had a penny for every time I have seen etcetera abbreviated as ect, I'd have at least enough for a decent dinner out.


I would write "et cetera", as it's two words in Latin. "Etcetera" is given as an alternative in some dictionaries, though.

The thing that annoys me most is the pronunciation "eksetera".

 
crissdee
1395293.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 4:11 am Reply with quote

Regarding the "-age" suffix, I have just remembered that, if an unlicensed restaurant premises allowed it's clients to bring their own booze, they are (or at least were at one time) obliged to charge them for the privilege, and that charge was known as "corkage".

 
Alexander Howard
1395305.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 5:30 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
If I had a penny for every time I have seen etcetera abbreviated as ect, I'd have at least enough for a decent dinner out.


On the contrary, it is a correct usage from the Molesworth books as any fule kno.

 
crissdee
1395344.  Wed Nov 17, 2021 8:35 am Reply with quote

Three from today.

In Llandrindod Wells;



Not seen that one before!

From the Brecon and Radnor Express;


Used Suzuki's what?


From our correspondent W.J. Spooner?

 

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