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Poor English in the media

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crissdee
1382724.  Fri Jun 04, 2021 12:03 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Well my hand is 8" from fingertip to wrist, so assuming the guy in the picture has a hand slightly larger than mine at 9" we could sort of guess it from that maybe?


Back-tracing the image reveals an article suggesting 13 feet long.

 
Brock
1384050.  Sun Jun 27, 2021 12:20 pm Reply with quote

Not really poor English, just an unfortunate turn of phrase.

Radio 4 continuity announcer just now: "A new one-off comedy starts tonight..."

...and presumably finishes tonight as well!

 
bobwilson
1384068.  Sun Jun 27, 2021 4:20 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
I do rather like the phrase 'damp squid' though. Literally it doesn't work, but the image of a damp and glum-looking squid is magic.


I liked Dave Gorman's take on this - "bowl in a china shop" is particularly amusing to those of us brought up in the more genteel era when all one had to fear was some nutter deciding to press the nuclear trigger

 
Brock
1384993.  Sun Jul 11, 2021 10:38 am Reply with quote

I wrote in this thread in May, regarding the Duke of Edinburgh title:

Brock wrote:

Yes, Prince Charles has inherited the title, but it's understood that when the title "reverts to the Crown" (i.e. when Charles becomes King), it will be bestowed on Prince Edward.

https://web.archive.org/web/20101203012826/http://www.royal.gov.uk/ThecurrentRoyalFamily/TheEarlofWessex/The%20Earl%20of%20Wessex.aspx


Or perhaps not. There are reports in the press today (originating in the Sunday Times) that Charles is unsure whether to grant the title to Edward, give it to another member of his family, or leave it in abeyance:

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/prince-charles-prince-edward-duke-of-edinburgh-title-b945180.html

Buckingham Palace has declined to comment.

 
crissdee
1385371.  Sat Jul 17, 2021 10:50 am Reply with quote

Not really the media, but so annoying I could not let it slide. Typing up an email, and I was offered the following "correction" of my English;



Seriously???? you want me to replace perfectly good English with some bastardised slang from the colonies? Not on my watch....

 
cornixt
1385912.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 9:06 am Reply with quote

Took me three parses before I stumbled upon the intended meaning of the following BBC News headline: Shooting rocks restaurant not far from White House.

If you're in DC, Shooting Rocks is a great restaurant for tourists. Or maybe there is a restaurant where you can shoot at rocks.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1385914.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 9:25 am Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Not really the media, but so annoying I could not let it slide. Typing up an email, and I was offered the following "correction" of my English;



Seriously???? you want me to replace perfectly good English with some bastardised slang from the colonies? Not on my watch....


Only got to is already bastardised slang from the colonies and so your spellchecker only suggested you go the whole nine yards with it. Makes sense to me.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
crissdee
1385941.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 2:07 pm Reply with quote

Not in that context. I was asking what other stock he had to make up my order into something worth travelling to the Post Office with, so "gotta make" would be horribly wrong.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1385944.  Fri Jul 23, 2021 2:15 pm Reply with quote

crissdee wrote:
Not in that context. I was asking what other stock he had to make up my order into something worth travelling to the Post Office with, so "gotta make" would be horribly wrong.


Ah OK, fair enough! Predictive text saw a string there, but no context.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
crissdee
1387279.  Wed Aug 11, 2021 1:39 pm Reply with quote



Proofreading people! Proofreading.....

 
Brock
1387427.  Fri Aug 13, 2021 4:12 am Reply with quote

Has anyone else noticed the creeping use of "reticent" to mean "reluctant"? I've heard it a few times now on the radio, but I think this is the first time I've seen it in print:

"Of course it was understandable people were so reticent to leave the house during the dog days of lockdown" (Daily Mail editorial, quoted in the "i" newspaper)

The only meaning given in the COED is "not revealing one's thoughts or feelings readily", and other mainstream British dictionaries concur, although Merriam-Webster has the following article:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/can-reticent-mean-reluctant

Maybe another American import, then?

 
Brock
1387498.  Sat Aug 14, 2021 12:51 am Reply with quote

Another one from Chloe Tilley on Times Radio:

"If you're at home and a little bit reticent about going back to the office..."

To me that would mean that you're going back to the office and you don't want to talk about it, but it's clear that she meant that you're not keen on going back to the office in the first place. Has this usage crept up recently, or have I only just noticed it?

 
suze
1387499.  Sat Aug 14, 2021 2:02 am Reply with quote

It may well be the latter thing, because I hadn't noticed it until you mentioned it.

I shall now listen out for it.

 
filofax
1388813.  Fri Sep 03, 2021 5:17 am Reply with quote

Quote from BBC:

"At this point she was heckled by Ms White, and although the exact words were not picked up by microphones in the parliamentary chamber the newly-elected MSP is reported to have said "except if you're English" - or words to that effect - apparently inferring that Ms Sturgeon was anti-English."


Inferring? INFERRING?

 
tetsabb
1389387.  Thu Sep 09, 2021 9:51 am Reply with quote

Does anyone understand this? New technology coming to a control room near me
Quote:
Enhance levels of cyclical baseline servicing to maintain the assets material condition.

 

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