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Duckworth Scale

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JumpingJack
62590.  Wed Mar 29, 2006 6:17 pm Reply with quote

Question:

What does The Duckworth Scale measure?

Forfeit:

HOW MUCH DUCKS ARE WORTH
THE PRICE OF DUCKS
OVERWEIGHT DUCKS
CRICKET SCORES

Answer:

Danger.

Notes:

The Duckworth Scale measures the likelihood of dying as a result of any given activity – 0 being the safest kind of activity and 8 being one that will result in certain death.

Like the Richter Scale, the Duckworth Scale is logarithmic. It grades a wide range of activities from washing up to playing Russian Roulette

The scale has produced some surprising statistics - smoking 40 cigarettes a day for a 35 year old male (7.1 on the scale) is almost as dangerous as playing Russian Roulette with one bullet (7.2).

According to the Duckworth Scale, the relative likelihoods of death from various activities are as follows:


0.0 Complete safety (living on earth unharmed for a year)
0.3 Single 100 mile rail journey
1.6 Being hit by an asteroid (in the lifetime of a new-born male)
1.7 Single 100 mile flight
1.9 Single 100 mile car journey (by sober middle-aged male)
4.2 Rock-climbing (single session)
4.6 Murder (in the lifetime of a new-born male)
5.5 Vacuuming; washing up; walking down the street
5.5 Car accident (in the lifetime of a new-born male)
5.5 Accidental fall (new born baby boy)
6.3 Rock-climbing (over 20 years)
6.4 Deep-sea fishing (over 40 years)
6.7 Smoking (35 year old male, 10 a day)
6.9 Smoking (35 year old male, 20 a day)
7.1 Smoking (35 year old male, 40 a day)
7.2 Russian Roulette (single game, one bullet)
8.0 Russian Roulette (single game, six bullets); Jumping off the Eiffel Tower; Lying down in front of the Flying Scotsman


Formally known as the International Nuclear Event Scale, the Duckworth Scale was invented in the year 2000 by Dr Frank Duckworth, the editor of the Royal Statistical Society News.

With Tony Lewis, the sports commentator, Dr Duckworth also invented the Duckworth/Lewis Method, a mathematical formula for deciding the probable score for the team batting second in an interrupted one-day cricket match when (for example) rain stops play. Invented in the early 1990s, it is commonly agreed to be much fairer than previous methods, has been used on over 200 occasions including the Cricket World Cup in 1999 and has recently been adopted by the ICC as their standard ‘rain rule’.

Picture ideas

Gawd knows.

Sources:


s: cou
s: www.rss.org.uk/main.asp?page=1881
s: http://news.bbc.co.uk/sportacademy/hi/sa/cricket/features/newsid_2660000/2660337.stm
s: wik

 

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