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'Knees and Knockers' erratum

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Sheogorath
1104823.  Tue Dec 09, 2014 8:58 pm Reply with quote

It was said in Knees and Knockers that the popular musical Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat must be spelt in American English because of trademark issues. This is incorrect. Since film processes and theatre performances are different fields under trademark law, I can't see any issue there. Also, since the correct spelling of the Technicolor name is already in American English, spelling the name of a competing product that way would more likely create conflict than resolve it. My personal belief is that the name of the show is spelt the way it is either because it was imported to the UK from the US, or someone simply thought it looked 'cool'. Simples!

 
14-11-2014
1104826.  Tue Dec 09, 2014 9:57 pm Reply with quote

Sheogorath wrote:
Since film processes and theatre performances are different fields under trademark law, I can't see any issue there.


I can. "Technicolor" is the registered trademark, probably of the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation. In another case a (rather boring) comedian was not allowed to call his show "Chanel 4711" nor "Rolls Royce Kadett", but the use of the title "Kadett 4711" was allowed.

 
Sheogorath
1104916.  Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:04 am Reply with quote

"Technicolor" is the registered trademark, probably of the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation.
Oh, I get it now! Explains the continuing legal issues between the purveyor of iDevices and Apple Records. Do you understand the phrase 'different fields under trademark law' yet? *rolls eyes*

 
suze
1104926.  Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:47 am Reply with quote

The legal name of the musical theatre piece under discussion is Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor® Dreamcoat, and those performing it are required to state in publicity that "Technicolor® is the registered trademark of Technicolor group of companies".

Precisely why these things are so I know not, but they are made very clear to those who are granted a performance license.

 
14-11-2014
1104932.  Wed Dec 10, 2014 12:08 pm Reply with quote

Sheogorath wrote:
Do you understand the phrase 'different fields under trademark law' yet? *rolls eyes*


Yes, I do understand a lot of irrelevant phrases.

 
14-11-2014
1104949.  Wed Dec 10, 2014 1:06 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
The legal name of the musical theatre piece under discussion is Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor® Dreamcoat, and those performing it are required to state in publicity that "Technicolor® is the registered trademark of Technicolor group of companies".


I cannot find the T&C when you want to use a name that's not 'cool', but there are, for what it is worth, different UK licenses. Academic schools, colleges, universities and church groups are allowed to use another title, without the ®:

Quote:
the dramatico-­musical work entitled JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT


But there's a restriction, indeed related to publicity. The use of just this title is:

Quote:
strictly confined to the Licensee's own premises and website


Otherwise (outside) you'll have to use the official JOSEPH logo. So there's more than one title, with and without ®, but not in publicity.

Somehow this reminds me of BankING, possibly intentionally founded by somebody I knew (let's call him Frits), before another bank decided to use this name:

 
Alfred E Neuman
1104967.  Wed Dec 10, 2014 2:38 pm Reply with quote

Sheogorath wrote:
"Technicolor" is the registered trademark, probably of the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation.
Oh, I get it now! Explains the continuing legal issues between the purveyor of iDevices and Apple Records. Do you understand the phrase 'different fields under trademark law' yet? *rolls eyes*


If you're always this forceful, it's going to be interesting having you around for a while...

 
Spud McLaren
1104977.  Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:36 pm Reply with quote

Sheogorath wrote:
My personal belief is that the name of the show is spelt the way it is either because it was imported to the UK from the US...
It's not that, as both the show's writers are English, were writing in England at the time, and the show was first (and in subsequent versions over the next couple of years) produced in England.
Quote:
…or someone simply thought it looked 'cool'.
Andrew Lloyd-Webber, maybe. What does he know about cool?
Quote:
Simples!
It rarely is. Unfortunately.

 
suze
1105009.  Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:14 pm Reply with quote

According to Tim Rice's autobiog (Oh, what a circus, 2012, London: Hachette), the piece was originally called Joseph and his Coat of Many Colours.

They thought that a bit boring though, so resolved to come up with something better. Rice wanted to call it How to succeed in Egypt without really trying, while Lloyd-Webber had the idea of adding the word Technicolor.

There had only been a handful of public performances before lawyers for Technicolor sent a "cease and desist" letter. But Rice and Lloyd-Webber's agent had anticipated this, and came up with a wizard wheeze - he advised Technicolor that they had been given permission to call the show Joseph and the Amazing EastmanKodakColor Dreamcoat, but would prefer to use the word Technicolor. This was completely untrue, but Messrs Technicolor dropped their objection as fast as a very fast thing.

 
Sheogorath
1106127.  Wed Dec 17, 2014 4:40 am Reply with quote

@ suze: I haven't googled all you said, but I believe you. My one question is why didn't the QI Elves know that when the info was clearly available, and instead try to claim that the trademarked word is spelt in British English when it very clearly isn't?

 
suze
1106199.  Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:20 pm Reply with quote

A good question, and I doubt that there's any better answer than "They got it wrong".

This does happen occasionally, unfortunately.

 
14-11-2014
1106313.  Thu Dec 18, 2014 7:57 am Reply with quote

Sheogorath wrote:
instead try to claim that the trademarked word is spelt in British English when it very clearly isn't?
suze wrote:
A good question, and I doubt that there's any better answer than "They got it wrong".

This does happen occasionally, unfortunately.

It's not a good question at all. A better answer is that Sheogorath is wrong again.

QI transcript, Stephen Fry wrote:
They have to spell it like that, the American way, in order to use the word Technicolor.

 
Sheogorath
1130099.  Sun Apr 19, 2015 7:16 am Reply with quote

Nice taking things out of context to make me wrong. Now do you wanna try posting a transcript of the entire discussion, or are you afraid of being wrong yourself? And please note, I use subtitles, so didn't have to rely on hearing alone.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1130129.  Sun Apr 19, 2015 4:14 pm Reply with quote

Oh, don't worry too much about 14. He somehow always manages to offend, no matter which of his many aliases he's using at the time...

 
WalterWKrijthe
1320002.  Sun Apr 21, 2019 12:22 pm Reply with quote

Am I the first to notice the error in the Indonesian tongue twister? I couldn't find any reference to it. time index 31:16 Stephen Fry says it correctly, but on the screens it states:
Kelapa diparut, kepala digaruk
Kepala diparut, kepala digaruk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwZBEo2JHIw&t=1819s

 

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