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Lovely

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Rasmus
1103312.  Sat Nov 29, 2014 4:08 am Reply with quote

What do you (pl.) think of the Lovely episode?

The lack of memory keeps surprising me. There's a lot of recycling, but in this episode Stephen made several comments, which were contradictory to previously QI claims.

Both him and Alan have said, that they do not like to watch the show themselves, but perhaps it should be mandatory for them to revision.

 
JivviWesty
1103352.  Sat Nov 29, 2014 2:16 pm Reply with quote

Would doubt they would actually have time? Tho editing could be more expected to sift previously done material than those delivering the material unless it's questions repeated? I didn't notice so am no help.

 
Zziggy
1103399.  Sat Nov 29, 2014 7:26 pm Reply with quote

No mention of rogue waves? Fry said surface waves in the open ocean have small height but large wavelength - generally true but I would have thought rogue waves would be QI enough to get a mention.

 
CharliesDragon
1103457.  Sun Nov 30, 2014 1:45 pm Reply with quote

Just a small note on potatoes as aphrodisiacs: it might even be that women got sufficient nutrition to menstruate and carry babies to full term, not just that infant mortality dropped a bit.

I was also very impressed with the distinction of "vulva" from "vagina," the latter having developed into a catch-all term for ladybits, and then Stephen goes "I'm not sure what a vulva is, to be honest." Which is not surprising, really.
As for other animals having vulvas, I would say cats and dogs don't. Chimps certainly have a lot of flesh back there, but I don't know if that would be considered a vulva. They might just have horrible hemorroids for all I know.

God, Freud would have a field day with me...

I'm not completely comfortable with saying Wellington "seduced" Josephine and Josephina. It makes it sound like they had little to no say in the matter, or that he just had to badger them long enough for them to give in, which is not nice. If it was just reading out what was reported at the time I'll let it slide, but otherwise I feel it is weird. You might call it nitpicking, but that's what people do on this site.

Oh, and about goats as nannies: I'm pretty sure goat milk is the preferred substitute when bringing up animals. At least cats, including lions and tigers and such, and possibly dogs. I have a feeling it might not be bad for deer and antilopes, either. Cow milk is really not good at all, not even for us. I guess we drink it mostly because one animal produces more milk compared to goats or sheep.

The Debters' Prison priests are interesting, indeed. Presumably you'd be contributing to a good cause by using them, too, as they'd get a bit closer to getting rid of their debt. They're unlikely to gamble away the money, at least.

As for leek/ljk/whatever it was called, onion is "lk" in Norwegian. We might have got it from you guys...

I can't say I noticed any glaring repeats, but my concentration is really bad as of late. It took me a lot more than 45 minutes to watch the XL version, since I kept pausing to do other things, including writing this comment.

 
14-11-2014
1103520.  Mon Dec 01, 2014 5:48 am Reply with quote

Quote:
onion is "lk" in Norwegian. We might have got it from you guys...


http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lauch_(Gattung)

leek (n.)
culinary herb, Old English lc (Mercian), leac (West Saxon) "leek, onion, garlic," from Proto-Germanic *lauka- (cognates: Old Norse laukr "leek, garlic," Danish lg, Swedish lk "onion," Old Saxon lok "leek," Middle Dutch looc, Dutch look "leek, garlic," Old High German louh, German Lauch "leek"). No known cognates; Finnish laukka, Russian luk-, Old Church Slavonic luku are borrowed from Germanic.

 
RLDavies
1103549.  Mon Dec 01, 2014 10:59 am Reply with quote

I don't know if goats' milk is the best option for human babies (after human milk), but it was widely thought to be, at least. I think goats were also less likely to be diseased than cows.

"Vulva" is defined as "the external genital organs of the female mammal". It's pretty much the same in all placental mammals.

 
swot
1103589.  Mon Dec 01, 2014 1:32 pm Reply with quote

I know that goat's milk is slightly higher in fat than cow's milk, so if both are available, I'd think goat's milk would be preferable for a baby. The fats and proteins in goat's milk are shorter than in cow's milk, making it easier to digest, and there is a protein linked to allergy in cow's milk that isn't in goat's milk.

 
swot
1103602.  Mon Dec 01, 2014 2:02 pm Reply with quote

This is kinda spammy, because it's the website of a goat's milk company, but it's well-referenced: http://www.sthelensfarm.co.uk/health-benefits

 
CharliesDragon
1103642.  Mon Dec 01, 2014 5:50 pm Reply with quote

14-11-2014 wrote:
Quote:
onion is "lk" in Norwegian. We might have got it from you guys...


http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lauch_(Gattung)

leek (n.)
culinary herb, Old English lc (Mercian), leac (West Saxon) "leek, onion, garlic," from Proto-Germanic *lauka- (cognates: Old Norse laukr "leek, garlic," Danish lg, Swedish lk "onion," Old Saxon lok "leek," Middle Dutch looc, Dutch look "leek, garlic," Old High German louh, German Lauch "leek"). No known cognates; Finnish laukka, Russian luk-, Old Church Slavonic luku are borrowed from Germanic.


Thank you.

 
Peeeeeteeeee
1103653.  Mon Dec 01, 2014 8:06 pm Reply with quote

On the whole milk topic thing. I heard somewhere that human babies are born, able to eat dairy products and to use the proteins properly. When they are older (around 4 or 5 years) they should not be able to process these dairy product properly (lactose). Over the years humans have evolved to be more tolerant to lactose. Those who are lactose intolerant are actually the people who are not the mutants.

If anyone can back this up, let me know.

 
Zziggy
1103681.  Tue Dec 02, 2014 4:51 am Reply with quote

I can't back it up with references, but I can back it up with "yes I have also heard that". It's the reason Western Europeans are the least likely to be lactose intolerant and is the result of a mutation first occurring in Turkey about 10,000 years ago (actually that might be blonde hair ...) in any case, yes, I'm pretty sure that not being lactose intolerant is a mutation and the "standard" human loses the ability to digest dairy as a youngster. This is normal among mammals if I remember correctly.

 
Zziggy
1103691.  Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:14 am Reply with quote

Actually, it looks like there are three different mutations that can cause lactase persistance correlating with whether you are European, East African/Middle Eastern or North African. The theory is that it continued due to natural selection favouring those who didn't turn into fart machines after a teaspoon of milk (ok that's not exactly what the theory says, but I've shared a room with a lactose intolerant person who's accidentally eaten cheese) - which makes sense with the fact that the geographical distributions of lactase persistence and domesticated cattle are strongly correlated.

My half-remembered information wasn't ... too far off, since
Wiki wrote:
The version of the allele most common amongst Europeans is estimated to have risen to significant frequencies about 7,500 years ago in the central Balkans and Central Europe, a place and time approximately corresponding to the archaeological Linearbandkeramik and Starčevo cultures.

So within 10,000 years rather than 10,000 years ago, and I must have got Turkey from that Starčevo culture which is located in now Serbia, but from the map does seem to include the European part of Turkey.

 
CharliesDragon
1103704.  Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:59 am Reply with quote

I thought it also had something to do with our gut flora, but that might not be correct, or not as important.

 
PDR
1103726.  Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:55 am Reply with quote

I thought that lack-toes intollerence was a Norfolk thing (where any fewer than six per side is considered a mutated deficiency).

PDR

 
Peeeeeteeeee
1103853.  Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:50 pm Reply with quote

How do you accidentally eat cheese?....Is this as dirty as it sounds?

 

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