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Yaks, dris and milk

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Theophilus
125142.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 5:43 pm Reply with quote

Just saw the episode on BBC2 , and was thrilled to see that a correction that I made almost exactly a year ago, was taken up. You don't get milk from Yaks, you get it from "Dris", the female of the species. I seem to remember being told that it was too pedantic when I posted it. But it just goes to show nothing is too pedantic for QI!

 
Jazzie26
125153.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:22 pm Reply with quote

Why is that to do with the "D" series? Although it is QI!

 
Ameena
125154.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:27 pm Reply with quote

It might've been a GI question, in which case it doesn't have to relate to "D", I don't think...

 
smiley_face
125155.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:29 pm Reply with quote

Well, the milk comes from the female yak, which is called a Dri, so I suppose that's got something to do with D.

 
Jazzie26
125156.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:34 pm Reply with quote

LoL, I was messing... the subject title could at least be changed!

 
djgordy
125189.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 7:37 pm Reply with quote

Theophilus wrote:
Just saw the episode on BBC2 , and was thrilled to see that a correction that I made almost exactly a year ago, was taken up. You don't get milk from Yaks, you get it from "Dris", the female of the species. I seem to remember being told that it was too pedantic when I posted it. But it just goes to show nothing is too pedantic for QI!


I don't think it is being too pedantic; I think it is just being wrong.

The English word for the species Poephagus grunniens is "yak" and this word applies to the male and female both. So, when speaking English, it is quite correct to say that one may get milk from a yak.

The word "yak" derives from a Thibetan (or Tibetan) word which when rendered into Latin lettering is "g-yak" or "gyak" or "gyag". In Thibetan this word refers only to the male of the species.

When words become adopted into another language their meaning and usage in the new language may be different to that in the original language. So when using the word "yak" in English, it is wrong to insist that it must have the same meaning or usage as it does in the Thibetan language.

 
Flash
125198.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 7:55 pm Reply with quote

Indeed, Theophilus, it was your post which brought this to our attention. You can find it at post 30679, but it said this:
Quote:

When Stephen was casually listing animals from which we can get milk he mentioned Yaks. This is, I believe, a common error and one that Tibetans often laugh at (at least I think that's why they were laughing at me); the Yak is the male of the species and hence can not be milked. The female of the species is the "dri", and that's where "Yak" milk comes from. Only a technical point, I guess, but nearly interesting.


Frederick the Monk, who is an Elf, immediately made the same point as djg:

Quote:
That's very interesting. If Stephen had been listing animals in Tibetan then he would indeed have been wrong as the female of Bos grunniens is, as you rightly say, known as a dri or nak. In English however both sexes are generally referred to as Yaks.


but we shouted him down as we were more amused by Theophilus' take on the subject.

 
djgordy
125200.  Fri Dec 08, 2006 8:07 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Frederick the Monk, who is an Elf,


...except on Saturdays when he is Napoleon.

 
50scarrow
125311.  Sat Dec 09, 2006 2:23 pm Reply with quote

Is yak's milk pink? Or pale green? I'm sure it's one of the two, but can't remember.

 

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