View previous topic | View next topic

Mondegreens - song lyrics you get really wrong.

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

Jenny
1079088.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 12:47 pm Reply with quote

Profuse apologies people - I tried to move the Mondegreens thread to this forum, and ended up accidentally deleting it and can't recover it.

Please start again!

 
Strawberry
1079094.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:00 pm Reply with quote

The other Mondegreens thread is still there.

Post 7853

 
Jenny
1079097.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:01 pm Reply with quote

Well it's not letting me move it to here! And when I click on your link and go to the thread, and go from there back to the forum, it doesn't appear. I guess I could try and copy some posts to here...

 
Jenny
1079098.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:04 pm Reply with quote

Jenny
7853. Wed Jul 14, 2004 2:06 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
These are creative mishearings of well-known words, usually of songs but not always.

The name comes from the creative mishearing of the words to 'The Earl of Moray', transforming it from 'They have slain the Earl of Moray, and laid him on the green' to 'They have slain the Earl of Moray and Lady Mondegreen'.

This thought was prompted by a recent discussion on a Guardian thread, where three people revealed three different mondegreen versions of 'Lord of the Dance' experienced by themselves as children as 'I am the Lord of the Dance settee', 'I am the Lord of the Dancing Tea' and 'I am the Lord of the Downstairs tea.'

I remember Jasper Carrott doing one about Queen's little excursion into opera, with the line (as he heard it) about 'Beelzebub's got a devil for a sideboard'.

Others can be found here, but I wondered if we had any of our own to contribute?

http://www.corsinet.com/braincandy/wrlyric.html


raindancer
7854. Thu Jul 15, 2004 1:27 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Jenny

Oh, yes. My partner, bless her soul, is very prone to this. I can't remember them all, but one of her famous ones was Juliette Pinochet for Juliette Binoche.

They got so comical that I began making a list, but I can't find it yet.

The other ones that spring to mind are the Dylan song 'Knocking on Heaven's Door' which they used to sing as 'Knocking on Kevin's door' - which is actually hilarious - and 'The Shriek of Agony' for 'The Sheik of Araby'.

BTW, do you remember that Radio 4 programme where the team were given a phrase or sentence, and had to explain its origin? Of course, the stories were silly, and the original sentence was transformed into a funny sound-alike.

I think it had Dennis Norden and Frank Muir as the two regular team-leaders, but I can't remember the name of the programme.


Liebig
7855. Thu Jul 15, 2004 2:32 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
There's also the visual mondegreen. I spent several years half-way through the last decade musing on how many people these days had small boats which they could transport on their car roofs. It was only relatively recently that I discovered there had been a revolution in roof rack design.


Frances
7857. Fri Jul 16, 2004 3:03 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Does the literary mondegreen count? I taught some wicked kids once who complained to a store manager that they had watched the step, as his notice warned them to, for ten minutes, and it hadn't done anything...


Old Bailey
7858. Fri Jul 16, 2004 3:28 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
This is the bit where Alan Davies smugly says 'Gringo' whereupon alarms sound and the 3ft word flashes on the screen behind.

Apparently not proven, but here is the jist of it:

GRINGO - The "Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins" by William and Mary Morris (HarperCollins, New York, 1977, 1988) says that the "...legend that the Spanish American term 'gringo' - a pejorative label for an American - came from 'Green Grow the Lilacs' is a good story..." American soldiers was supposed to have "...sang this song repeatedly" during the Mexican war and the "natives" heard it as "green-grow," thus "gringo."

There are others unsubstantiated versions here:

http://www.plateaupress.com.au/wfw/gringo.htm


Commander
7859. Fri Jul 16, 2004 5:52 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
The Toyota Starrion is another interesting yet doubtful story. Apparently the UK factory were told the name of the car by a Japanese exec over the phone and set to work making the badges. When it came to light that the name was actually 'Stallion' and they had misheard due to the Japanese confusion with R and L it was too late since the cars were already badged up and off the production line.


Flash
7864. Fri Jul 16, 2004 6:00 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Gringoes:
Quote:
Although the first recorded use of "gringo" in English dates from 1849 (when John Woodhouse Audubon, the son of the famous nature artist, wrote that "We were hooted and shouted at as we passed through, and called 'Gringoes'"), the word was known in Spanish well before the Mexican-American War. According to Rawson, the Diccionario Castellano of 1787 noted that in Malaga "foreigners who have a certain type of accent which keeps them from speaking Spanish easily and naturally" were referred to as gringos, and the same term was used in Madrid, particularly for the Irish.
The true origin of gringo is most likely that it came from griego, the Spanish word for "Greek." In Spanish, as in English, something difficult or impossible to understand is referred to as being Greek: We say "It's Greek to me," just as in Spanish an incomprehensible person is said to hablar en griego (i.e., "speak in Greek"). The English version of the proverb shows up in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar (1599), when Casca, one of the conspirators against Caesar, proclaims:
Nay, an I tell you that, I'll ne'er look you i' the face again; but those that understood him smiled at one another and shook their heads; but for mine own part, it was Greek to me.
The same phrase was also used (at about the same time) by another Elizabethan playwright, Thomas Dekker, but its origins are much older: it comes from the Medieval Latin proverb Graecum est; non potest legi (i.e., "It is Greek; it cannot be read").
It is certainly possible (and even likely) that the Mexican-American War precipitated the introduction of the Spanish word gringo into the English language, but the word itself antedates that conflict by at least sixty years and had nothing to do with singing soldiers, American or otherwise.

http://www.snopes.com/language/stories/gringo.htm

Starion:
Quote:
Stories such as this one should always be taken with a grain of salt, because they depend upon the premise of a multi-national, multi-million-dollar company's making its marketing decisions in a vacuum (nobody in all of Mitsubishi noticed the error or thought to question the name), and, having caught their mistake, deciding that the model name of their first entry into the lucrative American market wasn't important enough to merit correction.

(which seems to be the sensible reaction to me, although the story can't be definitively rebutted, it seems)
http://www.snopes.com/business/misxlate/starion.asp

cf discussion elsewhere on the name "Silver Mist", supposedly used for a Rolls Royce post 6799


Commander
7868. Sat Jul 17, 2004 5:01 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I always thought that REM's "Call me when you try to wake her" was actually "Calling Cheryl Baker".

Which I actually prefer ...


Frances
7870. Sat Jul 17, 2004 5:06 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
There's also the classic little boy's version of the hymn, 'Gladly, my cross-eyed bear.'


Jenny
7879. Sat Jul 17, 2004 6:16 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Listening to the radio this morning, I was reminded of a mondegreen one of my kids came up with as a small child if Tom Jones' The Green Green Grass of Home came on the radio then:

Down the road I walk and there runs Mary
Hair of gold and lips so hairy


raindancer
7934. Mon Jul 26, 2004 4:32 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
My partner came up with another one the other day. She said 'Ah well, lepers never change their spots'.

We were out walking by a river, and she said something like 'Estuaries always smell so clean', and I said 'How come?' because I thought she'd said 'Ashtrays'. Silly but true!

(I liked the hairy lips one!)


raindancer
7935. Mon Jul 26, 2004 4:41 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
At my junior boarding school, we used to have an evening service on Sunday's in the small school chapel. It wasn't compulsory, but I went now and again because they sung lovely hymns like 'The day thou gavest, Lord, is ended'.

Our headmaster was called Barry Still. As part of the service, he read out the first few verses of the fourth psalm. The fourth verse goes 'Commune in your own chamber, and be still'.

I know lots of them used to turn up just to hear him say 'be still', usually to the occasional stifled giggle, but he never turned a hair.


Jenny
7941. Tue Jul 27, 2004 12:42 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I used to love 'The Day Thou Gavest Lord Is Ended'. We only ever had it on the last day of term, because on that day we always had an assembly at the end of the day as well as the beginning.


raindancer
7942. Tue Jul 27, 2004 3:45 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
There was another one today. At some point, I threw up my hands in mock desperation and said 'I've had enough!'

Someone turned round and asked 'Who with?' When I looked bewildered, she said 'Oh, I thought you said you'd fallen in love'.


Flash
7944. Tue Jul 27, 2004 11:13 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I was at Speakers' Corner once many years ago, and the speaker was talking about the sinfulness of Ancient Rome. "They spent the whole day in orgies and lustful living," he said. "No, they didn't," said another. "How do you know?" asked the speaker. "Because I used to live there," said the other. "You used to live in Ancient Rome?" said the speaker. "Oh, sorry," said the other. "I thought you said the Edgware Road."

 
Jenny
1079099.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:05 pm Reply with quote

Sapientum
7947. Wed Jul 28, 2004 8:02 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I think the show to which raindancer refers was My Word.

My top 3 misheard or just poorly interpreted song lines and titles are:

1) The Big Horse song.
Maybe its Big Horse I'm a Londoner.

2) My Pimple Hurts
My Simple Heart.

3) Go and get Stuffed
Going Get's Tough


Sapientum
7948. Wed Jul 28, 2004 8:35 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Ever since visiting Japan on business I have been fascinated with the country's use of English words when naming products. It seems they use English to give the product a certain style or class. From my personal observations the name doesn't even need to make any sense it just needs to sound "cool" to the Japanese ear. A good example of this was a combined mobile phone and mp3 player product called "Beat Carrots".

One of our pastimes on taxi rides through the chaotic streets of Tokyo was to spot the brand names of the cars. Examples included the Toyota Windom and several from Nissan who have the Prairie Joy the his and hers named Cedric and Gloria the elegant Fairlady and the honest, but hardly appealing Cube. I am still to this day trying to work out what the Bluebird Sylphy is all about.

This seemingly random selection or jamming together of English words can be odd to those of us who speak the language natively, but it Japan is seems to have become a very successful way of giving a product or service that allure of Western sophistication. Sometimes they can get it right. Often the result is a cause of occidental hilarity. For example there is a toilet paper called "My Fanny", and beverages called "Pocari Sweat" and "Mucos"- hmmm, imagine chugging back a refreshing glass of that. There are also a couple of cosmetic products with don't quite hit the mark "Cookie Face" and "Salad Girl".

Then as often as it is funny, it can be disastrously wrong. The best examples I can think of at the moment are one from Sanrio, the makers of Hello Kitty, who might have invested a bit more time in checking thoroughly on the possible meanings of name of their character Puchi Puchi Wanko.

There is also a Japanese pharmaceutical company with a whole range of skin care products prefixed with the word Skina. Not bad you might think, even appropriate, but what exactly are we to make of "Skina Babe", and Skina Fukifuki"? Apparently the former is a Baby Oil - one hopes for putting on baby and not made from the pressed contents thereof - the latter is a skin cleanser. However one wonders exactly what image the brand manager was going for in this choice.

Do you have any good examples of the weird but wonderful world of Japanese brand names?


Jenny
7952. Wed Jul 28, 2004 10:31 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Those are brilliant! Sorry - don't have any to add, but I did enjoy the ones you mentioned.

I've just remembered a lovely example of a (presumably) unintentional cause of mondegreens. I used to work with a guy whose surname was Carr. Unfortunately for him, his parents had chosen to saddle him with the given name of Wayne. Yes, that's right, Wayne Carr. Oh dear. Surprisingly, he hadn't grown up large and aggressive as one might imagine he might from the boy-named-Sue effect.


raindancer
7955. Wed Jul 28, 2004 4:46 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Sapientum

Thanks. 'My Word' it was. Wonderful!

http://www.whirligig-tv.co.uk/radio/myword.htm


raindancer
7956. Wed Jul 28, 2004 4:49 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Jenny

Wayne Carr. Oh dear. Even worse than Fifi Trixiebell etc.


Flash
7957. Wed Jul 28, 2004 4:58 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
"My Simple Heart" is actually "Bicycle Pump", isn't it?


raindancer
7975. Fri Jul 30, 2004 6:28 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Jenny

I was thinking about Wayne Carr earlier. Was that in England or the States?

I only ask because 'Wayne Carr' seems a sort of American pronunciation, but I'm wondering if it's an American expression... or am I just being pernickety?


raindancer
7976. Fri Jul 30, 2004 6:33 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Sapientum

I thought your Japanese run-down was wonderful! Cedric and Gloria...


Jenny
7978. Fri Jul 30, 2004 7:02 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
No it was actually in England, and a few years ago too, since the gentleman in question is probably around my age and I was in my thirties at the time.


raindancer
7979. Sat Jul 31, 2004 4:45 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Ah ha, I thought so. The Americans don't say w*****, do they? It was the Wayne that threw me.

We used to have someone called Peregrine Punnett. He came in for a lot of stick, poor chap. He used to walk everywhere on his toes, and I'm sure it was anxiety. Life can be cruel, can't it?


Sapientum
7980. Sat Jul 31, 2004 6:16 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Jenny,

You friend Wayne Carr must have been doubly embarrassed when self styled Media Terrorist Chris Morris decided to use that very name for a particularly cheesy Disk Jockey character on his "On The Hour" radio spoof. (Series 1 Episode 5 First Broadcast: 06/09/199)

I did a quick Google (apparently a way of authenticating "facts") and I discovered that there really are an awful lot of Wayne Carrs out there. As Raindancer suspects most of these are in the USA.

I used to work with a guy whose family name was Organ. On announcing the pregnancy of his wife he forestalled a good deal of the possible naming humour by announcing that if he were a boy it would be called Everard, and the girl would be Ophelia.

One other I have been told about; my sister was a supply teacher at a school where there was a little girl called Rosy Bottom. Poor kid, I bet she can't wait to be married!


Commander
7981. Sat Jul 31, 2004 1:09 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
If you are at all interested in Japanes to English translations or product names, then this is the site for you!


Sapientum
7982. Sat Jul 31, 2004 6:20 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Oh Deep Joy! Thank you Commander.


Jenny
7983. Sun Aug 01, 2004 11:01 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Deep joy reminds me of 'Professor' Stanley Unwin, who always sounded as if he ought to make sense if you could only concentrate hard enough on it.

http://www.hippy.freeserve.co.uk/unwin.htm


Sapientum
7986. Sun Aug 01, 2004 4:41 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
What? He did make sense. At least he did to me when I was a child. But then most of what everyone else said to me at that time (certainly my schoolteachers) sounded like utter gobbledy-gook.

I think the secret with Unwinese is not to listen too hard. Just let it sort of wash over you and you get the drift in the end.

Hugh Dennis does an excellent Unwin impression. Maybe the lingo will live on for a while yet.

 
Jenny
1079100.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:05 pm Reply with quote

Flash
7987. Sun Aug 01, 2004 8:13 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I bought an Unwin CD recently ("Rotatey Diskers With Unwin") and while I laughed like a drainers, oh yes, I have to say that it passed completely over the head top and scalpicolds of the teeny-agers in this householders, oh the folly. And they completely mis-undercomprehended its formerly populode.

But, to revert to the Englode for a momentary, I do think he would have been an excellent guest on the TV show, and the sound guys agree with me (Unwin was a BBC sound man originally).


djgordy
34698. Sat Nov 26, 2005 6:31 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Sapientum wrote:
I think the show to which raindancer refers was My Word.

My top 3 misheard or just poorly interpreted song lines and titles are:

1) The Big Horse song.
Maybe its Big Horse I'm a Londoner.

2) My Pimple Hurts
My Simple Heart.

3) Go and get Stuffed
Going Get's Tough



Let's not forget that classic by the Jam "Eating Trifles".


Celebaelin
34700. Sat Nov 26, 2005 6:38 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
And who can forget the Police classic "Sue Lawley"?

I feel Sue Lawley.


(So Lonely)


grimwig
98480. Mon Oct 02, 2006 9:11 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I remember BBC RADIO 2 dj Ken Bruce deliberately introducing the song Sad Sweet Dreamer as they seemed to sing it- Septicaemia

Let's not forget that he was the man who said on National Census week "If you are having trouble filling out your form here's John Denver on the subject" cue Annie's song 'you fill out my senses....'


feynmanMH42
107313. Thu Oct 26, 2006 10:06 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Anyone heard of animutation?

It was invented by a 14 year old genius named Neil Cicierega; I happen to have correspondence with Neil himself through email and a forum. He's now 20 years old and perhaps more famous for his music as Lemon Demon (his most famous song being Ultimate Showdown): www.ultimateshowdown.org

But animutation contains more mondegreens than you can shake a stick at.

"TV says donuts are high in fat, kazoo."
"Found a hobo in my room."
"It's princess Leia, the yodel of life, give me my sweater back or I'll play the guitar."


Yoda
107366. Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:33 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Further to Commanders post 7859 of this thread - way back in the day 16 Jul 2004 - 10.52 hrs precisely - on the Toyota Starrion as an example of misheard-isms resulting in a badging error, I would like to offer another.

When I served Queen and Country in Her Majesties Royal Air Force, a constant debate raged on the whether the following was an urban myth or not....

29 Squadron has for a number of years had Roman Numerals on the Tail of its aircraft. The story goes that the RAF Painter tasked with adding this essential piece of art to the tail of a number of aircraft, asked what the 'art' was to look like. He was told, 'its 29 in Roman Number Mate, init.' 'What do they look like?' he asked. 'Its 2 X's followed by one X, mate', his helpful adviser replied. To this day, the 29 Squadron aircraft have been adorned with XXX. Which, I guess, from the original painter and dopers (maybe a clue there m'thinks) point of view read as XX 1X, instead of XXIX.

Yoda


Jenny
107426. Thu Oct 26, 2006 2:21 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Excellent story - and welcome to you, Yoda :-)


Frances
112142. Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:45 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I've often wondered why people in 'The Professionals', on being shown [briefly] a card with 'CI5' on it, never asked, 'So what is this C 15 then?'


cabs
112143. Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:51 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
They thought they were being sold blank tapes.


'yorz
890897. Fri Mar 02, 2012 9:57 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
I had a cup of coffee at a friend's place this morning. I knew she had a canasta session last night, which is why I asked her, "Did it get late?".
She looked at me aghast and said, "Excuse me?!"
And honestly, I hadn't asked her whether she did get laid.


Sadurian Mike
890909. Fri Mar 02, 2012 10:28 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Frances wrote:
I've often wondered why people in 'The Professionals', on being shown [briefly] a card with 'CI5' on it, never asked, 'So what is this C 15 then?'

That reminds me of a cautionary tale told by my Secuurity Studies lecturer. I have no idea if this is true, but it should be if it isn't. The lecture was stressing the importance of Communication as opposed to simply forwarding information.*

Anyhoo, a US airforce ground unit were told by posted memo that they would be working with MI6 on a particular operation. Sure enough, at the appointed time they all turned up with their M16 rifles ready.


*In other words, the message must be both transmitted and understood for true communication.


Jenny
891053. Sat Mar 03, 2012 5:30 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
How nice to see this thread resurrected.


mckeonj
891068. Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:28 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Gladly the cross-eyed bear


Strawberry
891069. Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:34 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Frances mentioned that on page 1.


lemme
891075. Sat Mar 03, 2012 6:43 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
'He's well fed on Mackeson' (His welfare is my concern)

Hollies - He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother'

For younger readers Mackeson is a milk stout - a sweet dark beer once thought to be very nutritious and given to nursing mothers.

 
Jenny
1079101.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:06 pm Reply with quote

Efros
891086. Sat Mar 03, 2012 7:18 am Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
"There's a bathroom on the right"

CCR


nitwit02
891247. Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:04 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
and an oldie:
'Oh a tree in motion'
(Poetry in motion)


suze
891742. Mon Mar 05, 2012 5:46 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
'yorz wrote:
I knew she had a canasta session last night.


Are there really still people who play canasta!? Even my mom considered canasta as a game of the generation before hers. (Dad was a decade older than Mom and might have considered it as of his generation, but the only card games he played were ones that you could bet money on.)

In the pub where we go there is a group who occasionally play bezique, a game that was really quite trendy in the 70s. One of the group who play it is a woman of around 60 who wears leather trousers, so I suspect that she was too ...


Efros
891763. Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:10 pm Reply with quote Edit/Delete this post Delete this post View IP address of poster
Hey, I play canasta, used to hammer anyone that dared to challenge me on pogo. I was a member of one of the most cutthroat canasta schools ever formed. Games were every lunch time for an hour over a period of 10 years, players came and went but we had a hard core of 3. My mate used to get so wound up during a grab the pack hand that his hands would literally shake with the tension. More sledging went on than in any Test match.

 
Jenny
1079102.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:07 pm Reply with quote

OK that's all the ones I could pick up from Strawberry's link, but I still can't find the original thread.

 
Leith
1079107.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 1:26 pm Reply with quote

Some more in Google's cache, Jenny:
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:JZtSvcj-Y3EJ:old.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php%3Ft%3D8879%26start%3D90

 
'yorz
1079117.  Sun Jun 08, 2014 2:37 pm Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Profuse apologies people - I tried to move the Mondegreens thread to this forum, and ended up accidentally deleting it and can't recover it.

Please start again!


:-D So you're a mere mortal after all, Jenny :-)

 
Jenny
1079221.  Mon Jun 09, 2014 11:28 am Reply with quote

Leith - yes, you can pick up that page but not the rest as far as I can see. Still, I've got the posts before it deteriorated into chat a bit.

'Yorz, yes I'm sad to say my inner goddess let me down :-(

 
ConorOberstIsGo
1079250.  Mon Jun 09, 2014 3:25 pm Reply with quote

Belle and Sebastian's

"/Me and the Major don't see eye-to-eye on a /number of things [..]"

but I heard

"/Me and the midget don't see eye-to-eye [..]"

And

In The Garden of Eden:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida[/url]

 
AlmondFacialBar
1079261.  Mon Jun 09, 2014 4:25 pm Reply with quote

As sung by the congregation of the First Church of Springfield...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlwtgaQZYDI

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Janet H
1099641.  Tue Oct 28, 2014 3:47 pm Reply with quote

Ok,in my defence, I am slightly deaf, but.......

Last night Mike and I were chatting about his part time work delivering curries for the local Takeaway.

The boss is named Mr Ahmed, but we call him Mr A. They were very busy over the weekend and thought Mike said " Mr Anus be coining it"
He claims he actually said " Mr A must be coining it"

 
Spoilt Victorian
1099696.  Wed Oct 29, 2014 9:30 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
As sung by the congregation of the First Church of Springfield...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlwtgaQZYDI

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


...in a similar vein

 

Page 1 of 2
Goto page 1, 2  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group