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Deception

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Bunter
60875.  Sun Mar 19, 2006 4:22 pm Reply with quote

What does Bugs Bunny have in common with the Easter Rabbit and Brer Rabbit?

Forfeit: They are all rabbits.

Answer: They are all hares.

Bugs Bunny and Brer Rabbit are both modelled on North American Jack Rabbits, which are actually long eared, large legged hares.

Bugs Bunny, who won an Oscar in 1958 for Knighty Knight, made his screen debut in 1938 in Porky’s Hare Hunt, in which Porky Pig (not Elmer Fudd) was trying to hunt down the hapless ‘wabbit’.

Mel Blanc, the voice of Bugs Bunny loathed carrots: nevertheless he still had to chew them during recordings as no other vegetable could replicate the desired crunch sound.

The origins of Brer Rabbit can be found with the story telling traditions of African American slaves, who told a variation of tales of the hare being more wily than the fox.

It is claimed that Robert Robert Roosevelt, uncle of President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt and a friend of Oscar Wilde, was the first person to write down the stories for publication in Harpers magazine, where, unfortunately, they were poorly received.

The Easter Rabbit was conceived from pagan worship of Eostre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring and fertility.

Eostre’s symbols were eggs and hares, which were long associated with the moon goddess as they came out frequently at night.

Christians adopted the hare in the 19th century as a symbol for Easter, but turned it into a rabbit to avoid comparisons with paganism.
Pagans were not alone in their worship of hares.

In Chinese mythology, Rabbit-god Wu Tien Bao was revered as a homosexual deity.

Although it has recently been discovered there are at least four species of Hares in Europe, their populations are dwindling. European Brown Hares are declining over most of England, and in other countries close relatives of the Hare including the Assamese Hispid Hare, the Ethiopian Hare, the Mexican Volcano Rabbit and the Sumatran Rabbit are either rare or endangered.

Quite Interestingly, Louis XVIII of France had the exquisite talent of telling just from the smell of a rabbit stew, which part of France the rabbit had been killed in.


Last edited by Bunter on Fri Mar 24, 2006 11:37 am; edited 1 time in total

 
Flash
60894.  Sun Mar 19, 2006 6:50 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Mel Blanc, the voice of Bugs Bunny was allergic to carrots


A statement which is pervasive on the internet but which is apparently contradicted in Blanc's autobiography:

Quote:
I don't especially like carrots, at least not raw. And second, I found it impossible to chew, swallow, and be ready to say my next line. We tried substituting other vegetables, including apples and celery, but with unsatisfactory results. The solution was to stop recording so that I could spit out the carrot into a wastebasket and then proceed with the script. In the course of a recording session I usually went through enough carrots to fill several.

 
Bunter
61751.  Fri Mar 24, 2006 11:37 am Reply with quote

I've altered the allergy x

 
eggshaped
64977.  Wed Apr 12, 2006 5:31 am Reply with quote

In New Zealand they have something called the "Great Easter Bunny Hunt" which is a rabbit-shooting competition based in Alexandra, S Island.

Obviously rabbits are thought of as pests in Australia and New Zealand - last year over 20,000 rabbits were shot over the Easter weekend, the winning team bagged 1,800.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12265571/

Any thoughts on whether or not Roger Rabbit is a hare?

 
Gray
64985.  Wed Apr 12, 2006 6:42 am Reply with quote

Roger Rabbit shares certain physiological characteristics with Bugs - i.e. very long, pink-filled ears and large feet. I'd say he's a hare.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Framed_Roger_Rabbit
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugs_Bunny

 

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