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Invented Languages

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djgordy
1068443.  Fri Apr 11, 2014 11:39 am Reply with quote

Phineas and Ferb* had "Ferb Latin". With every word of more than two letters you move the first letter of the word to the end of the word and add "erb".

There are a few other rules. E.g: when someone sneezes you blow a flugel horn and give away your left shoe; although I expect most people do that anyway.

None of these are really "invented languages" though (except to the extent that all languages are invented).

*Kids cartoon .

 
Dix
1068446.  Fri Apr 11, 2014 12:56 pm Reply with quote

AprilFool91 wrote:
Quite a fun invented language where you add "op" to the end of each consonant.

"A language created in Eastbrook Highschool in Indiana. The spelling rule of oppish is that you add -op to every consonant. Also, all vowels are said as they are in the alphabet" (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=oppish)

Stephen Fry = Sop-top-e-pop-hop-e-nop Fop-rop-yop
Alan Davies = A-lop-a-nop Dop-a-vop-ie-sop


I've met a few people fluent it this.

I asked them to say phrases like "let's go pop some popcorn". Hilarious.

 
AprilFool91
1068459.  Fri Apr 11, 2014 1:26 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
None of these are really "invented languages" though (except to the extent that all languages are invented).

*Kids cartoon .


You know what I mean though. Invented in the sense that they are nonsense languages made up without the intention that they would ever be used in daily use.

 
Starfish13
1068524.  Sat Apr 12, 2014 2:40 am Reply with quote

Apparently, the name Khaleesi has been given to around 150 baby girls in the US in the past year. Before this, it was completely unknown as a name, due to it being a totally made-up word. Khaleesi means the equivalent of princess or queen in the Dothraki language spoken by characters in the Song of Ice and Fire series of fantasy novels by George R.R. Martin, and popularised by the Game of Thrones TV series.

 
djgordy
1068526.  Sat Apr 12, 2014 2:49 am Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:
Before this, it was completely unknown as a name, due to it being a totally made-up word.


As opposed to all the words that were only partially made up.

 
ConorOberstIsGo
1068530.  Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:01 am Reply with quote

Yeah, that Saussure guy was a dick cos of onomatopoeia and the lexical tendency toward "ma". What a jerk!

 
germananglophile
1068778.  Sun Apr 13, 2014 11:36 am Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:
Apparently, the name Khaleesi has been given to around 150 baby girls in the US in the past year. Before this, it was completely unknown as a name, due to it being a totally made-up word. Khaleesi means the equivalent of princess or queen in the Dothraki language spoken by characters in the Song of Ice and Fire series of fantasy novels by George R.R. Martin, and popularised by the Game of Thrones TV series.


Here's an article about the guy who invents the Dothraki language for the show: http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20470532_20702678,00.html

 
germananglophile
1068788.  Sun Apr 13, 2014 12:12 pm Reply with quote

The Klingon language from Star Trek has its own dictionary and case sensitive font, a language institute (Wikipedia link) ( site link here), and has made multiple appearances in pop cultural media from TV shows to a Kate Bush song. It has also been used to adapt productions of "A Christmas Carol", "Much Ado about Nothing" and "Hamlet" in the Klingon language.
The latter had one production in which Stephen Fry performed- from the Wikipedia article: "This performance was reprised on February 27, 2011 featuring Stephen Fry as the Klingon Osric and was filmed by the BBC as part of a 5-part documentary on language entitled Fry's Planet Word."

A father in Minnesota taught his infant son Klingon as his first language but apparently the child, now a teenager, does not speak the language anymore.
Minnesota seems to be the groundbreaking go-to place for Klingon anyway: In 1993 the first Klingon Language Camp was held there.
Klingon has been taught at a few Colleges however.

Well, then... Qapla' !

 
Kimstu
1072812.  Tue May 06, 2014 8:58 pm Reply with quote

RLDavies wrote:
The children's TV show Zoom*, from 1970s America, had a similar secret language called "Ubbi-Dubbi", in which you add "ub" before each vowel sound.

Stephen Fry: Stubephuben Fruby ("Frub-eye")
Alan Davies: Ubaluban Dubavubies

It's amazing how little time it takes to become fluent in this sort of thing.

====

* Still proud to call myself a Zoomer!


Thanks for the zombie earworm!

"Z-double-O-M! Box 350, Boston, Mass., OH-two-ONE-three-FOURRR"

 
Prof Wind Up Merchant
1091783.  Thu Aug 28, 2014 4:40 pm Reply with quote

Every language is invented you could say.

 
ConorOberstIsGo
1091815.  Fri Aug 29, 2014 3:25 am Reply with quote

Some fictional languages aren't.....

 
swot
1091824.  Fri Aug 29, 2014 4:11 am Reply with quote

There are Monty Python gags in the foreign language scenes of Game of Thrones by the fake language writers.

 
CharliesDragon
1091942.  Fri Aug 29, 2014 5:55 pm Reply with quote

germananglophile wrote:

The latter had one production in which Stephen Fry performed- from the Wikipedia article: [i]"This performance was reprised on February 27, 2011 featuring Stephen Fry as the Klingon Osric and was filmed by the BBC as part of a 5-part documentary on language entitled Fry's Planet Word."


Thanks, I will now have to watch all five hours of that. (Not because of Klingon, because of Fry and language.)

On the topic of invented languages, I caught half a minute of The Big Bang Theory yesterday where Amy was making up a language where the word "plankĘ°" meant spoon with food on it. The only problem is you can't put umulats over ěs! I hate it when people who don't speak any language with ě or umulated letters (mostly Americans) throw them around like they're just fancy Os. They are not.
I've also encountered people who didn't know Schr÷dinger is not pronounced Schrodinger...

 
berty ashley
1097869.  Tue Oct 14, 2014 12:46 am Reply with quote

The official Korean language of 'Hangul' was created by Sejong the Great. A ruler of the Joseon Dynasty around 1440. Till then the learned people wrote in Chinese and pretty much everyone else was illiterate.

wiki says - Hangul was designed so that even a commoner could learn to read and write; the Haerye says "A wise man can acquaint himself with them before the morning is over; a stupid man can learn them in the space of ten days."

 
suze
1097953.  Tue Oct 14, 2014 12:10 pm Reply with quote

We're in danger of mixing up a language with a writing system here.

It is entirely true that the hangeul alphabet was devised at the behest of Sejong the Great in about 1443. Before that, few in Korea were literate at all. Most who were literate were priests and members of the aristocracy, and as suggested they wrote mainly in Classical Chinese. (In some cases they could read and write in Chinese, but not speak it. They spoke Korean, a language which has existed for at least one thousand years.)

The first move on from there had been the notion of using Chinese characters to write Korean, a system known as hanja. This is first attested around 1100, but was never widespread and was largely confined to priests. A small corpus of poetry written in hanja is known, but the nobility continued to write to each other in Chinese.

Even today schoolchildren in South Korea are taught some hanja to represent common words. They're not used a great deal though; newspapers and TV captions use them for the names China, Japan, and Korea if short of space, advertising logos sometimes use them, and university students use them as a sort of shorthand / to show how clever they are. But letters and mass market books use hanja hardly at all.

Hangeul took a while to catch on - many in the upper orders considered it inferior to hanja and wouldn't use it. Literacy took a fair while to catch on too, and not until after WWII was it the case that most Koreans could read and write using hangeul.

 

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