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stopped being called football

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Alfred E Neuman
1126405.  Sun Mar 29, 2015 5:06 am Reply with quote

NeilP wrote:
Here's one good way to start an argument... Australian Rules Football is the only code that can be truly called 'Football' - because you can only score a goal (or the highest point score) with the foot (actually from below the knee). Soccer, Gridiron, etc allow carrying the ball, header, etc.


Strictly speaking, you can only score a goal in rugby by kicking. A converted try is a goal. When rugby began, you got no points for getting a try, you got the right to try for a goal, by kicking, or converting it into a goal. So, while you get points for a try and a conversion these days, a full seven pointer is still technically called a goal. Also, the correct term for a penalty is a penalty goal. And then you get dropped goals.

So all three forms of goal in rugby are scored with the foot.

 
Awitt
1126408.  Sun Mar 29, 2015 5:28 am Reply with quote

Australia and Ireland have, over the years, played matches, where they've learnt our code and our players have done theirs. Some Irish players have come here and one prominent player, who died of cancer a couple of years ago, was a result of this.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Stynes

 
suze
1126420.  Sun Mar 29, 2015 8:37 am Reply with quote

Posital wrote:
Admittedly the rules also include:
"(iii) The ball may not be lifted off the ground with the knees."


As far as I can tell, this means that you're not allowed to kneel on the ground, grip the ball between your knees, and then stand up with it so gripped. Why anyone would ever want to do that, I have no clue.

As for scoring a goal with the hands, I think the rule means that you may punch a moving ball for a goal. But if you catch the ball, you can then only score a goal by kicking it.

Alfred E Neuman wrote:
Strictly speaking, you can only score a goal in rugby by kicking.


This is a very good point, and I think I must klaxon myself and give you some points. While the main objective of rugby is to score tries, the scores actually called goals are achieved by kicking.

And indeed, it's the same in American and Canadian football. The main objective is to score touchdowns, but the scores actually called goals are achieved by kicking.

Incidentally, drop goals are actually allowed in the NFL. The legendary quarterback Doug Flutie knew this, and talked the coach into letting him try it for a bit of fun in his last game before retirement. He scored it and it's on every "strange things that happened in the NFL" video, but it was the first time it had even been attempted for over sixty years.

Mr Flutie's drop goal was a point after touchdown (i.e. a conversion, in rugby terms). A drop goal in open play is also allowed but even rarer; it was last done successfully in 1941, but Mr Flutie's antics led to two unsuccessful attempts being made in recent years.

 
Posital
1126457.  Sun Mar 29, 2015 1:29 pm Reply with quote

Oooh - a challenge.

What should "American football" be called?

I struggle with it being called American, because that's the name of two continents and confusing. To be frank, the whole country should be renamed too...

So let's drop the American bit. Done.

What's special about the game?
1) it's an ovoid ball game
2) everyone wears armour
3) each team has attackers and defenders with only one on field at a time.
4) It has y-shaped posts

Here we go:
Ovoid ball game, with armoured part-time play. Why goals?

There must be a joke in there somewhere. Help please.

 
CharliesDragon
1126512.  Sun Mar 29, 2015 7:34 pm Reply with quote

It's called hand-egg. You use your hands, the ball is shaped sort of like an egg.

 
Spud McLaren
1126513.  Sun Mar 29, 2015 7:48 pm Reply with quote

Hand-Egg With Kicking Allowed*.

HEWKA.

On t'other hand, it's also known as gridiron, in the same way as proper football is colloquially called soccer. No idea why, though.

* but this could also apply to either version of Rugby...

 
suze
1126576.  Mon Mar 30, 2015 6:36 am Reply with quote

If you mean "why is football also known as soccer", that is discussed upthread.

If you mean "why is American football also known as gridiron", it's because the pattern of lines on the field looks a bit like like a wire grill tray aka gridiron.

 
Spud McLaren
1126660.  Mon Mar 30, 2015 12:35 pm Reply with quote

Not only did I anticipate being informed, I also knew who'd do the informing...

I assumed it might be to do with the layout or formation of something, but TBH I was too knackered at the time to care enough to find out for certain.

 
Jenny
1126701.  Mon Mar 30, 2015 4:50 pm Reply with quote

The -er ending is a common form of not exactly abbreviation but friendly reference in English though. Just ask the chaps who play rugger at Twickers.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1246750.  Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:18 am Reply with quote

Just a thought. I've been reading that 'football' ,in whatever guise, is called that for the simple reason that it is played on foot, regardless of whether a ball is carried, headed or kicked.

 
PDR
1246788.  Sat Aug 26, 2017 6:15 pm Reply with quote

That could also be said of rugby, tennis, cricket, running, shopping and privy council meetings, but I suspect we wouldn't call those "football".

"Handball" is not played by people walking on their hands...

PDR

 
crissdee
1246798.  Sun Aug 27, 2017 3:40 am Reply with quote

Small point, under that definition, Privy Council meetings would surely be called "arseball".

 
PDR
1246810.  Sun Aug 27, 2017 5:57 am Reply with quote

The point about PC meetings is that they are held standing up (I think it was Queen Vicky who introduced that to encourage brevity).

PDR

 
suze
1246821.  Sun Aug 27, 2017 7:09 am Reply with quote

So it is often suggested, certainly. One version is that those present at the first meeting after the death of Prince Albert remained standing out of respect to the late consort, and that Queen Victoria liked the brevity which resulted and so decided to stick with it.

 
crissdee
1246829.  Sun Aug 27, 2017 8:22 am Reply with quote

I did not know that.......

 

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