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Lickerish/Liquorice

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RLDavies
1069382.  Thu Apr 17, 2014 9:19 am Reply with quote

I see that the "English drop" is like Bassett's Allsorts, with fondant coatings, etc. The "Dutch drop" you linked to is plain liquorice. Is that the difference?

 
germananglophile
1069396.  Thu Apr 17, 2014 10:05 am Reply with quote

RLDavies wrote:
I see that the "English drop" is like Bassett's Allsorts, with fondant coatings, etc. The "Dutch drop" you linked to is plain liquorice. Is that the difference?


Perhaps it is just a case of things being called different things in other countries (e.g. "Crumpets" (UK)/ "English Muffin" (USA/CA)). This Wikipedia list of liquorice confectionery doesn't even mention English drops.

 
Starfish13
1069404.  Thu Apr 17, 2014 10:19 am Reply with quote

germananglophile wrote:
Is there some international perception of English things being related to licorice? post 1008133


I'd say that liquorice isn't that common a flavouring for British food, I can only think of liquorice allsorts, black jacks and Pontefract cakes. In Scandinavia and Finland, it seems like the majority of sweets are liquorice flavour or salmiakk (salt liquorice). Think liquid-liquorice filled chocolates, chocolate coated chewy liquorice, liquorish Haribo, liquorice chewing gum, salt sild, Tykisk peber, salmiakki ice-cream, etc.

You can also get liquorice and salmiakki-flavoured alcohol, like Fisk in Denmark and Opal Red in Iceland.

 
germananglophile
1069414.  Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:29 am Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:
Think liquid-liquorice filled chocolates


o_O That does not sound like something that should go together flavour wise.

 
suze
1069443.  Thu Apr 17, 2014 4:18 pm Reply with quote

Starfish13 wrote:
In Scandinavia and Finland, it seems like the majority of sweets are liquorice flavour or salmiakk (salt liquorice). Think liquid-liquorice filled chocolates, chocolate coated chewy liquorice, liquorish Haribo, liquorice chewing gum, salt sild, Tykisk peber, salmiakki ice-cream, etc.


And of course, this Danish brand of salmiakki flavoured pastilles ...

 
ConorOberstIsGo
1069925.  Mon Apr 21, 2014 8:18 am Reply with quote

When in Germany I was a little dismayed to see liquorice, advertising proudly on the bag as being "frisch mit Ammoniumchlorid!"

Probably says more about my cultural views towards Ammonia and Chlorine as the ever-sinister "chemicals"!

 
Spud McLaren
1069934.  Mon Apr 21, 2014 9:36 am Reply with quote

germananglophile wrote:
Perhaps it is just a case of things being called different things in other countries (e.g. "Crumpets" (UK)/ "English Muffin" (USA/CA)).

English muffins.




Crumpets. Different.

 
'yorz
1069935.  Mon Apr 21, 2014 9:59 am Reply with quote

Licorice... there's the Dutch double salt drop (= licorice). I used to eat them lots, but don't think I could stomach them now. The salt content is vast.

 
knightmare
1069940.  Mon Apr 21, 2014 10:15 am Reply with quote

Quote:
The salt content is vast.


That'll be a salt, ammonium chloride (salmiakki).

 
ConorOberstIsGo
1069942.  Mon Apr 21, 2014 10:38 am Reply with quote

Yes, the 'salmiak' definitely sounds a lot nicer than 'Ammoniumchlorid'.

 
germananglophile
1069943.  Mon Apr 21, 2014 10:38 am Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
germananglophile wrote:
Perhaps it is just a case of things being called different things in other countries (e.g. "Crumpets" (UK)/ "English Muffin" (USA/CA)).

English muffins.




Crumpets. Different.


Faulty example then, but you know what I meant. <:)

(In Germany English muffins were marketed as "Toasties", just to add more random to this.)

 
nitwit02
1070007.  Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:52 pm Reply with quote

In Canada, crumpets are crumpets. I am drooling over Spud's picture ...

 
plinkplonk
1097243.  Thu Oct 09, 2014 6:53 am Reply with quote

Going back to liquorice it was a running joke in The Goon Show that Bluebottle had to careful about the amount he ate...

 
tetsabb
1097256.  Thu Oct 09, 2014 9:54 am Reply with quote

nitwit02 wrote:
In Canada, crumpets are crumpets. I am drooling over Spud's picture ...

I guess you mean 'the picture Spud posted' rather than 'a picture of Spud'
:-)

 
Jenny
1097298.  Thu Oct 09, 2014 3:08 pm Reply with quote

I haven't seen actual crumpets on sale over here, though we do get "English muffins" easily enough. The ones sold by a baker at our local farmers' market are excellent.

 

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