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Gladstone

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Flash
57746.  Tue Mar 07, 2006 11:09 am Reply with quote

Garrick, this should be your thread, but I need to post a couple of things before I forget them.

The question is perhaps:

What kind of bags did Gladstone take home at night?

or something, and it refers to his work in reforming prostitutes and the defence of his reputation against accusations of impropriety. Garrick wrote:

Quote:
A devout Christian, he tried to help ‘fallen women’. He would visit streetwalkers and try to persuade them to change their ways. The whole ‘kerbcrawler’ thing is a myth – and that’s official. In 1925, one Captain Peter Wright wrote disparagingly about ‘Old Gladeye’ and his use of such services. His family could not sue Wright for libel, because Gladstone (the defamed) was dead. They therefore wrote a series of letters attacking Wright in forthright terms, which they sent to various organisations of which Wright was a member.

One of these went to the Secretary of the Bath Club, accusing Wright of being both a coward and a liar. Wright was expelled. As intended, he sued Gladstone’s family. They of course pleaded truth as a defence, and proceeded to vindicate Gladstone’s reputation in court. Wright lost and the jury even added a rider exonerating Gladstone of Wright’s charges.

The user/Ripper charges simply seem to have arisen in that sequence because it is difficult for modern minds to imagine how incredibly strait-laced and repressed the Victorians actually were.


but he did use a symbol resembling a whip in his diary, and apparently it is thought that this may indicate times he felt tempted by the prostitutes or by 'marginally salacious material' (Roy Jenkins) and used self-flagellation as a means of repentance (link to deprivation, Simon Stylites, etc) - a practice also followed by Cardinal Newman and Edward Pusey.

 
Flash
57760.  Tue Mar 07, 2006 11:27 am Reply with quote

At various times in his career he supported slavery and the Confederate cause in the American Civil War, and tried to abolish income tax.

His hobby was chopping down oak trees. In 1842 he accidentally shot off the index finger of his left hand. In the 1868 election he lost his seat but luckily he was standing in two constituencies simultaneously and he won the other one. In 1880, pursuant to the same belt-&-braces policy, he won two seats and gave one to his son Herbert.

In 1895 he donated his library to found a new public library, and took them round there in a wheel-barrow: 23,000 of them. He was aged over 80.

His coffin was taken to his funeral on the London Underground.

 
Flash
57762.  Tue Mar 07, 2006 11:29 am Reply with quote

Links to diet:

Quote:
Around the end of the nineteenth century; William Ewart Gladstone, the four times British Prime Minister, had apparently advised that a person should always masticate thirty two times before swallowing (why thirty two? - The same number as the total of teeth in the mouth). This would inevitably lead to a lessening of the appetite and subsequent weight loss for better health.

Powerful world leaders usually have their opinions listened to with respect, but one American considered this with more than a passing interest. He was to come to believe that it was the perfect answer to the fat problem. This man was Horace Fletcher, who would become better known to the citizenry in the United States by the nicknames of ‘The Chew-Chew Man’ and `The Great Masticator.’

Horace Fletcher might have been himself inspired by Gladstone, but he was to take this enthusiasm for chewing to heights surely undreamt of, even by that worthy. The chewing should continue, he proclaimed, until the food becomes a liquid in the mouth. And any food that does not (like fiber) should therefore not be chewed in the first place.

Leaving fiber out of a diet leads to constipation, as those caught up in the frenzy of mastication were to painfully discover, but Fletcher persisted that this was right and a small price to pay, and lost over sixty pounds in weight by this approach.

http://www.thehistoryof.net/the-history-of-dieting.html

Why was Horace Fletcher called 'the Great Masticator'?

 

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