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High jump

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knightmare
1057090.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 5:39 pm Reply with quote

Assuming the use of a horizontal bar to measure the height, how high can tumbling gymnasts jump?




The selected images are related to the size of the images, but not to the best way to jump.

 
gruff5
1057132.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 9:39 pm Reply with quote

Looks very high, sometimes, doesn't it? Presumably not as high as a specialist high jumper doing the Forsbury (sp?) Flop, otherwise the gymnasts would enter the highjump & win the gold medals.

 
knightmare
1057133.  Tue Feb 18, 2014 10:16 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Looks very high, sometimes, doesn't it?


It does, albeit gymnasts often aren't that long. Hence the question.

Quote:
Presumably not as high as a specialist high jumper doing the Forsbury (sp?) Flop, otherwise the gymnasts would enter the highjump & win the gold medals.


As such I don't agree with the assumption, because it implies that nobody would have ever used Fosbury's innovation (QI series G, Gravity). Why use the Flop when everybody is using another technique? Nevertheless the height of a salto is probably often overestimated, because it sometimes looks very high indeed.

But I think one has to try (or already know) it. Please note I don't know the height of a floor salto, ignoring the different floor surfaces, so I'm not claiming a new technique just yet. I also think guesstimating the height won't do, because the gymnast has to jump over the horizontal bar to win the high jump event.

The height of a male Olympic salto appears to be closer to an impressive 2m than 3m, so a female salto may be a better bet.

 
suze
1057446.  Wed Feb 19, 2014 6:28 pm Reply with quote

Remember that those gymnasts jump off two feet, while the rules of track and field require the athlete to take off from one foot.

The IAAF doesn't keep an official world's record for a two-footed high jump, but there is footage of an unnamed gymnast clearing 2.46 meters off two feet. Mind you, he did it in a gymnasium with a sprung floor, which is not what is used in high jump competitions.

The world's record for normal high jump is 2.45 meters and has stood for twenty years, which is probably why this guy had the bar set to 2.46.


A gymnast might have a better chance if he were to attempt the standing high jump, in which a two footed take off is permitted. The world's record for that event is 1.90 meters, set by a Swede in 1980, although it should be noted that relatively few competitions are held in the event. It was an Olympic event until 1912, but since then has rarely been contested except at local games in Scandinavia.

Those Scandinavians do standing long jump in their local games too, and the record is 3.71 meters, set by a Norwegian as long ago as 1968. They don't do standing triple jump though, which is part of the reason that Ray Ewry's world's record of 10.58 meters set at the 1900 Olympics has never been beaten.

The other part of the reason is that Mr Ewry set a serious mark. People who have attempted the standing triple jump say that it's quite hard to do without falling over. A Romanian Olympic long jumper called Bogdan Țăruș has tried reasonably seriously to beat Mr Ewry's mark and has not succeeded.

 
knightmare
1057456.  Wed Feb 19, 2014 8:55 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Remember that those gymnasts jump off two feet, while the rules of track and field require the athlete to take off from one foot.


Thanks, and again excellent information. That would spoil it.

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The world's record for normal high jump is 2.45 meters


Or 2.09m, assuming men are normal too, but ...

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The world's record for that event is 1.90 meters, set by a Swede in 1980


... 1.90m still is not as high as any usual high jump world record. Okay, so it won't work without breaking the rules. I think I saw such an event once, and 1.90m is quite impressive.

 
CharliesDragon
1057749.  Fri Feb 21, 2014 6:07 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Those Scandinavians do standing long jump in their local games too, and the record is 3.71 meters, set by a Norwegian as long ago as 1968. They don't do standing triple jump though, which is part of the reason that Ray Ewry's world's record of 10.58 meters set at the 1900 Olympics has never been beaten.


I almost feel like this is insinuating Scandinavians are weird, but since I've been willingly living off liver and beets for the last months I'll guess I'll shut up... It's just that a lot of things, including sports, that seem normal to me are apparently not that common other places in the world. I think we did the standing long jump at a sports day at school once.

 
knightmare
1057772.  Fri Feb 21, 2014 7:52 am Reply with quote

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It's just that a lot of things, including sports, that seem normal to me are apparently not that common other places in the world.


That should apply to about all countries.

Quote:
I think we did the standing long jump at a sports day at school once.


Not that strange at all, at school. IIRC I've seen standing (high) jumps once, and it was an entertaining TV challenge with a height of over 1 meter. IIRC/2 the winner was a high jumping athlete.

 
suze
1057884.  Fri Feb 21, 2014 12:37 pm Reply with quote

You'll occasionally see standing jumps on American television, because they are among the athletic tests which take place at the NFL Scout Camp.

That is an event held in Indianopolis every February - and in fact, this year's event is this week, so now might be a good time to see standing jumps on TV - for college footballers chasing NFL contracts.

Loads of footballers converge on Indianopolis, where they are put through a variety of athletic tests, some written tests, a psych evaluation, a drug screen, and have the opportunity to meet with NFL scouts. (For not more than 15 minutes, and a third party times any such meetings with a stopwatch.)

The standing long jump (or broad jump as Americans call it) is done in a way which you'd recognize, although on grass rather than into a sandpit. The world's record has not yet been beaten, but the very best get within a couple inches of it.

The NFL standing high jump is very different than the version that track and field athletes know, though. There is no bar to clear, and an athlete's "score" is the difference between his maximum vertical reach in jumping and his maximum vertical reach when standing. (This YouTubeage may make the process clearer.)

That can't be compared in any meaningful way with the track and field standing high jump. The NFL record is 3' 10" (117 centimeters), which I suspect that a top class gymnast could beat quite easily.

 

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