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The 'B' List

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Liebig
1198.  Thu Nov 06, 2003 10:48 am Reply with quote

Frances, extremely good question, and you're quite right: it could be a major cottage industry. According to the Hutchinson Encyc. of I don't know what, the scales of the bleak are used in eastern Europe to stimulate the growth of pearls ( a bit I suppose like lobbing a grain of sand in, but perhaps producing a less " cultured " look ).

 
Terri
1201.  Thu Nov 06, 2003 11:13 am Reply with quote

Which B hired another B to use a third B to combat a fourth?

I give in! [is the word 'boxer' by any remote chance?]

 
Jenny
1204.  Thu Nov 06, 2003 5:16 pm Reply with quote

Further to Flanders mares - another reader of the Pepys website says that he bought a copy of “Moll Flanders” in the American Bookshop in The Hague last week and was told by the girl behind the counter that "in those days, every woman using Flanders as a last name was certain to be a prostitute”.

 
Jenny
1239.  Fri Nov 07, 2003 7:24 am Reply with quote

Terri - the answer to the battling Bs came on another thread, in post 1042

 
Terri
1246.  Fri Nov 07, 2003 12:23 pm Reply with quote

Ha! Thanks Jenny.

 
Jenny
1249.  Fri Nov 07, 2003 6:35 pm Reply with quote

What B combines art, religion, science and technology?

For a clue, see post 1248

 
Flash
1344.  Mon Nov 10, 2003 7:19 pm Reply with quote

B is for "Brachiosaurus".

Sauropods weighed as much as 30 tons, five times as much as an African elephant. They appeared about 210 million years ago, and disappeared with the rest of the dinosaurs about 65 million years ago. In many places, including Texas and Korea, researchers have found sauropod footprints -- but only from the front feet. Initially, researchers believed they wandered in swampy waters, too big to survive on land without buckling under their own weight, but by the 1970s, an examination of their bones revealed that they could support their own weight and were land dwellers. They couldn’t have been swimmers, the theory continued, because the water pressure on their massive bodies would have made it too difficult for their lungs to expand, and if they lost contact with land, they would have been in danger of tipping and not being able to right themselves. But now Donald Henderson, a University of Calgary researcher, thinks he may have solved a mystery about the long-necked dinosaurs that were the biggest creatures to ever walk Earth. At least one sauropod species, the brachiosaurus, probably tilted forward in the water so that its front legs touched the bottom and were able to help propel it forward. Henderson, whose work combines paleontology with biomechanics, says the dinosaurs were floating, and were able to punt along the bottom with their front feet, the key being that that they had spinal air sacs, balloonlike air bags similar to those that birds use to breathe. Henderson used three-dimensional computer modeling to show that these air-filled sacs acted like built-in life jackets, allowing sauropods to float in the water.

(Adapted from an article by Anne Mcilroy in the (Toronto) Globe and Mail, October 30, 2003)

 
Hans
2755.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 8:52 am Reply with quote

If I were a brachiosaurus what is it that I might find attractive (eyes? claws? car?) in another brachiosaurus?

 
JumpingJack
2757.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 8:55 am Reply with quote

The smell, probably.

 
Hans
2758.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 8:57 am Reply with quote

Jenny,

Was this B something that involved "brewing"?

 
Hans
2763.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 9:24 am Reply with quote

What might a brachiosaurus smell like?
Is there such thing as an olfactory archeologist?
Is a bad smell a bad smell to all or is there a Cultural Geography of Pong?
And has there ever been an aroma that was praised by one generation but thought by another not to be up to scratch (-n' sniff)?

 
Jenny
2768.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 9:31 am Reply with quote

Hans - no, this was http://www.tate.org.uk/netart/blessedbandwidth/ - an online art project which enables you to log on, choose a religion, and get blessed via a cable that has been already been blessed by a priest of the relevant religion. I myself have been blessed by the Buddhist Worli Temple http://www.blessed-bandwidth.net/worlibuddhisttemple/worlibuddhisttemple.htm

<smiles beatifically and disappears in a golden nirvanic glow>

 
Jenny
2769.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 9:33 am Reply with quote

Hans I like your post 2763

I think we ought to run with this one if anybody can work out how to google it.

 
JumpingJack
2773.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 9:43 am Reply with quote

Quote:
What might a brachiosaurus smell like?


Here's one idea.

The South American bird called the hoatzin is one of the most 'primitive' of birds, closer than most to the dinosaurs from which birds evolved, and it is also perhaps the most unpleasant smelling bird there is, with a rich aroma similar to cow manure.

The hoatzin is the only bird in the world to have evolved 'foregut fermentation' to digest its diet of leaves, a process more usually particular to mammals such as cows and sloths, and this is what causes the pong.

No one understands how the hoatzin evolved this capacity before mammals did, why no other birds developed a similar ability, or how the bird manages to do it with such a small stomach. (The stomachs of cows and sloths are enormous).

http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf066/sf066b06.htm

 
JumpingJack
2774.  Thu Dec 04, 2003 9:45 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Is there such thing as an olfactory archeologist?


No idea, but there is such a thing as an archaeoastronomer, the link to which is provided by the very same web page that I found the hoatzin on.

http://www.science-frontiers.com/sf066/sf066b06.htm

 

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