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'yorz
1047505.  Mon Jan 13, 2014 9:19 am Reply with quote

CharliesDragon wrote:
RLDavies wrote:
a ragbag of random trivia.


Can I refer to myself as that? I like the term, however not-positively you meant it.

I've been called 'a goldmine of useless information'.
Quite chuffed with that.

 
RLDavies
1047537.  Mon Jan 13, 2014 11:12 am Reply with quote

Colin refers to his mind as a rubbish heap of information. He has instant access to a wide variety of useless crap.

 
CB27
1047580.  Mon Jan 13, 2014 2:16 pm Reply with quote

On the 2011 census I was rather tempted to put "Pabulator and purveyor of peccadillos and poetry" for job title :)

 
zomgmouse
1047910.  Tue Jan 14, 2014 6:24 pm Reply with quote

Edwin H. Land, inventor of the polaroid, was mentioned. I know nothing about him save that he has one of my favourite quotes: "Marketing is what you do when your product is no good."

 
NigelHutson
1048114.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 10:46 am Reply with quote

Look here, any fool can think of 6-letter words in ascending or descending alphabetical order - especially when they allow duplicates, which no person of moral fibre would entertain for a moment...

On this topic, however, two points:
1) I urge you to stretch your horizons, perhaps by considering the word 'wronged' as an example.
2) Am I mistaken, or was this topic already presented to the unsuspecting public many years ago in the persona of Dr Donald Trefusis? Don't bother to respond, because I have the printed book on my shelf. Fry, you unconscionable self-plagiarist, I hope you're covered from head to toe in shame.

Having said all that, doesn't he look quite the hunk nowadays after losing weight?

 
djgordy
1048161.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 12:17 pm Reply with quote

NigelHutson wrote:
which no person of moral fibre would entertain for a moment...



Speaking as a person of no moral fibre, I am happy to entertain just about anything for at least two moments.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1048216.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:27 pm Reply with quote

NigelHutson wrote:
Look here, any fool can think of 6-letter words in ascending or descending alphabetical order - especially when they allow duplicates, which no person of moral fibre would entertain for a moment...

On this topic, however, two points:
1) I urge you to stretch your horizons, perhaps by considering the word 'wronged' as an example.


You mean stretching the horizon to 7 letters?

 
sally carr
1048224.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:39 pm Reply with quote

Ouch.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1048253.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 4:30 pm Reply with quote

NigelHutson wrote:
2) Am I mistaken, or was this topic already presented to the unsuspecting public many years ago in the persona of Dr Donald Trefusis? Don't bother to respond, because I have the printed book on my shelf. Fry, you unconscionable self-plagiarist, I hope you're covered from head to toe in shame.


*shrug* Johann Sebastian Bach plagiarised himself 24/7, so at the very least Stephen is in good company.

But what I really meant to say - no dissing lava lamps, please. They might look shite, but, my, are they ever destressing!

:-)

AlmondFacialBar


Last edited by AlmondFacialBar on Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:42 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
knightmare
1048261.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:23 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
You mean stretching the horizon to 7 letters?


By the way, I think mr. Fry just said that words of 6 letters in alphabetical are "rare". There were 2 examples, but nobody ever said that this was the whole list. This discussion is already stretched.

 
CharliesDragon
1048264.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:37 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
NigelHutson wrote:
which no person of moral fibre would entertain for a moment...



Speaking as a person of no moral fibre, I am happy to entertain just about anything for at least two moments.


"I believe at least six impossible things before breakfast."

 
knightmare
1048265.  Wed Jan 15, 2014 5:39 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
any fool can think of 6-letter words in ascending or descending alphabetical order - especially when they allow duplicates, which no person of moral fibre would entertain for a moment...

I urge you to stretch your horizons, perhaps by considering the word 'wronged' as an example.


For what it is worth:

7, L1 < L2:

(none)

7, L1 <= L2:

1 beefily
2 billowy

7, L1 > L2:

1 sponged
2 wronged

7, L1 >= L2:

1 sniffed
2 spiffed
3 sponged
4 spoofed
5 spooked
6 spooled
7 spooned
8 trigged
9 trolled
10 vroomed
11 woolled
12 wronged

I'm excited.

 
NigelHutson
1048406.  Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:28 am Reply with quote

CharliesDragon wrote:
djgordy wrote:
NigelHutson wrote:
which no person of moral fibre would entertain for a moment...



Speaking as a person of no moral fibre, I am happy to entertain just about anything for at least two moments.


"I believe at least six impossible things before breakfast."


If we're extending the discussion to include breakfast, which I'm not wild(e) about, then it has more to do with oral fibre...

 
crissdee
1137918.  Tue Jun 16, 2015 4:55 pm Reply with quote

Warning, obscure Holmesian reference alert!!!!

Just caught up with this on Dave, and noted the comments on "cow shoes" Alan suggested that they may be worn by horses who want to look like cows.

In "The Adventure of the Priory School" the villain Reuben Hayes shod his horse with shoes made to leave cow tracks. They were provided by Mr James Wilder, secretary and illegitimate son of the Duke of Holdernesse, and co-conspirator in the kidnap of Lord Saltire, legitimate son and heir of the Duke.

 
suze
1137921.  Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:20 pm Reply with quote

Ah yes. Let us consult Dr Watson's account of the matter:

The Adventure of the Priory School wrote:
"There is one other small point upon which I desire some light. This fellow Hayes had shod his horses with shoes which counterfeited the tracks of cows. Was it from Mr Wilder that he learned so extraordinary a device?"

The Duke stood in thought for a moment, with a look of intense surprise on his face. Then he opened a door and showed us into a large room furnished as a museum. He led the way to a glass case in a corner, and pointed to the inscription.

"These shoes," it ran, "were dug up in the moat of Holdernesse Hall. They are for the use of horses, but they are shaped below with a cloven foot of iron, so as to throw pursuers off the track. They are supposed to have belonged to some of the marauding Barons of Holdernesse in the Middle Ages."


Watson, Dr J H (1904). "The Adventure of the Priory School". In: Conan Doyle, A I (ed) The Return of Sherlock Holmes. London: Geo Newnes.

 

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