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the Olympic football tournament

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malala
1044207.  Sat Dec 28, 2013 8:07 am Reply with quote

How seriously do you take the Olympic football tournament? Not sure if it's highly rated in Britain but to me it's the highest football youth tournament in the world. Outside of the World Cup it's the tournament I look forward to th most that assemble ALL the biggest footballing nation in the world!


Last edited by malala on Tue Dec 31, 2013 12:53 am; edited 1 time in total

 
CB27
1044250.  Sat Dec 28, 2013 3:01 pm Reply with quote

You have to remember that, prior to the London Olympics last year, Great Britain hadn't bothered to enter the Olympics football tournament for over 40 years.

The problem during this time is that Great Britain was not represented as a single entity in world football, and had teams representing England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland separately. It took reassurances from FIFA that players will not be stopped from playing for the individual home nation teams to get a team together.

Another obstacle in the past, which is a common one to many sports in Britain, is that there are two views of the Olympics that shape funding and participation, and it seems difficult for some to find a compromise.

One view often used in the past is that the Olympics are supposed to be open to amateurs, and not professionals, and this is still a very traditional view in Britain. Another view, especially since the successes in Beijing and London, is that the Olympics should be seen as the pinnacle of each sport, and the football tournament is not considered anywhere near as big as the World cup and possibly other national and club tournaments.

 
knightmare
1044280.  Sat Dec 28, 2013 6:20 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
the football tournament is not considered anywhere near as big as the World cup and possibly other national and club tournaments.


Right. The World Cup isn't an unimportant "football youth tournament" and Olympic Games aren't a youth tournament, so the answer can also be found in the original question.

So what about FIFA policies, making more money their own exclusive show, popular in a lot of countries. FIFA doesn't need the IOC, and professional teams aren't always willing to pay the national bills.

In 2014, FIFA will pay the professional teams $70 million. The IOC won't. In 2014, teams in the World Cup final will earn $60 million (i.e. a little bit more than prize money in tennis). Oh, and the FIFA participation fee of $1.5 million per team. Dum dum...

 
Efros
1044282.  Sat Dec 28, 2013 6:47 pm Reply with quote

That link is geofiltered. This one isn't http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhiZ9p8HslM

 
suze
1044287.  Sat Dec 28, 2013 7:38 pm Reply with quote

knightmare wrote:
Olympic Games aren't a youth tournament.


The men's football tournament at the Olympic Games is a youth tournament - it is for Under-23 teams with three overaged players, and is the official world championship for that age group.

The women's tournament is for full national teams, and is considered more prestigious than the women's World Cup.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1246578.  Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:12 pm Reply with quote

malala wrote:
How seriously do you take the Olympic football tournament? Not sure if it's highly rated in Britain but to me it's the highest football youth tournament in the world. Outside of the World Cup it's the tournament I look forward to th most that assemble ALL the biggest footballing nation in the world!


The Americans in 1932 didn't seem to take it seriously at all, bearing in mind they didn't even bother to host the tournament in that year.

 
suze
1246582.  Thu Aug 24, 2017 3:51 pm Reply with quote

Before the World Cup started in 1930, the Olympic football tournament was more or less the world's championship. Football in Britain was openly professional by then and so the best players could not take part in the Olympics, but in most of the other leading football nations there was enough wiggle room in the definition of "professional" that the best players were there.

As noted, there was no football tournament at the 1932 Olympics held in LA. Football had little following in the US at the time, and the organizers wanted to have an American football tournament instead. The International Olympic Committee rejected that idea, so no football of any kind.

Professional footballers were excluded from the Olympics until 1984, so between 1936 and 1980 the football event was dominated by sham amateurs from the Soviet bloc. Officially there was no professional sport behind the Iron Curtain, but you need not suppose that leading footballers spent much if any time at their official state sponsored jobs. (Incidentally, this sort of game was not confined to the Soviet bloc. Christopher Dean and Jayne Torvill were officially employed by Nottingham City Council at the time of their Olympic gold in 1984, but their main duty appeared to be to spend hours each day checking the condition of the city's ice rink.)

In 1984 and 1988, the nations of Europe and South America were asked to field teams excluding players who had ever played in the World Cup, while the nations of the other continents were allowed to field full national teams. The two tournaments were won by France and the USSR, in both cases putting out more or less their national U-23 teams.

That gave FIFA the idea of making the Olympic tournament the official world's championship for U-23 teams, as it has been since 1992.

The women's football tournament at the Olympic Games is for full national teams, as noted above.

Incidentally, your post throws up some prehistoric spam from the opening post. Excuse me while I edit that out.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1246747.  Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:28 am Reply with quote

Actually it was the FIFAWorld Cup that started in 1930. The first World Cup tournament commenced in 1909, was organised in Torino, Italy by the famous British yachtsman and businessman Sir Thomas Lipton and involved teams from Italy, Switzerland, Germany and England. The English FA declined to nominate a team and, for reasons not 100% clear, a team from West Auckland, Co Durham was chosen and went on to win the trophy.

An ITV drama about their victory was made in 1982 starring Dennis Waterman.

 
suze
1246820.  Sun Aug 27, 2017 7:05 am Reply with quote

It is perhaps a bit over-romantic to describe that competition as the World Cup. It was for club teams rather than national teams, and was only open to entrants from Europe. All the same it is often referred to as a World Cup, although I'm unconvinced that it was referred to in that way at the time.

Why was West Auckland Town the club chosen? As you suggest, no one really knows. It's often suggested that Sir Thomas Lipton in fact intended to invite Woolwich Arsenal (the club which is now Arsenal) and that WAFC was misunderstood at some point in the process, but there is no evidence for this.

 

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