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Series K - Kitchen Sink

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Ian Dunn
1041226.  Sat Dec 14, 2013 5:27 am Reply with quote

Already spotted something for QI to retract in this episode.

Stephen talks about the film Battleship Potemkin in which the sailors are given biscuits that are covered in maggots. Stephen is wrong - it is actually meat which is covered in maggots, as can be seen here (5 minutes in).

Having said that it is not surprising this was wrong. After all, Victoria's a vegetarian.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1041253.  Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:20 am Reply with quote

It's also pronounced Patyomkin, and Stephen has always struck me as the kind of guy who'd know that, so I was a bit disappointed there.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Ian Dunn
1041268.  Sat Dec 14, 2013 10:22 am Reply with quote

To be fair to Stephen, it is a silent movie, so you never hear how it is pronounced in the film.

 
AlmondFacialBar
1041287.  Sat Dec 14, 2013 1:14 pm Reply with quote

I know that. But given that I was aware of it, it's clearly not arcane knowledge.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1041295.  Sat Dec 14, 2013 2:10 pm Reply with quote

I suppose the getout is that the movie is called Battleship Potemkin in English, but Bronenosec Potiomkin (or thereabouts) in Russian.

The Russians really don't help themselves with this one since they tend to omit the diaeresis on the <>, especially in upper case.

But in principle I, like AFB, would prefer the proper pronunciation. Most news media manage to get Gorbaczow right (it too contains an <> in Russian), although the tennisist Wiera Zwonariowa is often less fortunate.

 
mtwelles
1041515.  Mon Dec 16, 2013 9:30 am Reply with quote

Here's something that QI got wrong:

Chung Il-kwon was never president of Korea, but Prime Minister (equivalent of the American Vice President) under President Park Chung-hee.

 
Peaseblossom
1041570.  Mon Dec 16, 2013 2:57 pm Reply with quote

I was surprised to see kimchi - the national dish of Korea - served with wooden chopsticks. Korean chopsticks are made of steel, not wood.

It's not something QI got wrong, exactly, but I think it is worth mentioning because it's, well, interesting!

 
Mahesh
1041621.  Mon Dec 16, 2013 11:15 pm Reply with quote

Over-hung jaw

People in many parts of the world, vegetarian and meat-eaters alike, still do not use cutlery. How is it that they have over-hung jaws, if this is a product of evolution? Their jaw features would not have evolved. Thus cutlery-use cannot be the catalyst of the over-hung jaw!!

 
julesies
1041684.  Tue Dec 17, 2013 8:30 am Reply with quote

Mahesh wrote:
People in many parts of the world, vegetarian and meat-eaters alike, still do not use cutlery. How is it that they have over-hung jaws, if this is a product of evolution? Their jaw features would not have evolved. Thus cutlery-use cannot be the catalyst of the over-hung jaw!!

They weren't arguing that the overbite evolved, but that the use of cutlery helped shape the teeth in children (like how sucking the thumb can cause later teeth-position problems).

But your argument is valid. I don't know anything about the prevalence of overbites in cultures that use the teeth for gripping food, but it would be interesting to research. In a commentary C. Loring Brace, the anthropologist who put forward this hypothesis, states that among Australian Aborigines and Eskimos the change occurred over a single generation and coincided with the adoption of a Western diet, which argues in the hypothesis's favor, but it seems like there hasn't been a large statistical analysis like there needs to be to really answer this question.

 
dr.bob
1041697.  Tue Dec 17, 2013 9:14 am Reply with quote

Mahesh wrote:
People in many parts of the world, vegetarian and meat-eaters alike, still do not use cutlery. How is it that they have over-hung jaws, if this is a product of evolution?


The impression I got from this episode was not that it was the use of cutlery per se that produced the overbite, but rather the use of utensils to chop food up into small pieces before cooking.

Are there not people who eat with their hands who still create dishes made of small, bite-sized chunks of food rather than large hunks of meat that you need to use your incisors to cut up?

But then, what do I know? I don't even have an over-bite, so I'm clearly an evolutionary throw-back.

 
zomgmouse
1043719.  Thu Dec 26, 2013 5:26 am Reply with quote

Peaseblossom wrote:
I was surprised to see kimchi - the national dish of Korea - served with wooden chopsticks. Korean chopsticks are made of steel, not wood.

It's not something QI got wrong, exactly, but I think it is worth mentioning because it's, well, interesting!


Especially as they were talking about taking it into space. They'd never allow wooden chopsticks in space because the potential splinters would wreak havoc with the machinery (this is also why the "NASA spent billions to make a space pen while Russians just took a pencil" story is bollocks).

Incidentally, I mentioned this on another thread, but I would have loved to find out the identities of the remaining foods and pieces of cutlery that were left out of the programme. Is there any place the elves have disclosed them?

 
djgordy
1043741.  Thu Dec 26, 2013 6:47 am Reply with quote

zomgmouse wrote:
(this is also why the "NASA spent billions to make a space pen while Russians just took a pencil" story is bollocks).



Actually, originally both the Americans and Russians did use pencils, the Americans tried mechanical (aka propelling) pencils, but they were inadequate for the obvious reasons of having wood and graphite floating around. Other media were tried but eventually a solution was found via a privately developed space pen made by Paul Fisher. Since this wasn't a NASA product the Russians were able to buy them too.

You can buy a Fisher Space Pen for about $65.

 
zomgmouse
1043750.  Thu Dec 26, 2013 7:10 am Reply with quote

That's rather a lot less costly than a broken rocket.

 
eggshaped
1043761.  Thu Dec 26, 2013 10:00 am Reply with quote

I have to sat that IMO Potemkin is definitely pronounced the way Stephen did in English. If he made an absolutely correct Russian pronunciation (as my Russian wife just did so I could hear the difference) it would make it difficult for average people to understand.

Speaking of tennis players, I wonder how many of you regularly say Kournikova or Sharapova's names with a correct Russian pronunciation?

Anyway. I can't remember the unused cutlery, and I'm not at my desk, but if anyone could produce a screenshot then I'll happily fill in the gaps.

Good point re: Korean chopsticks, should've thought of that.

 
suze
1043791.  Thu Dec 26, 2013 12:14 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Speaking of tennis players, I wonder how many of you regularly say Kournikova or Sharapova's names with a correct Russian pronunciation?


I do. But then I would, I suppose!

Kurnikowa is the weird one - it's stressed on the first syllable. As far as I've ever been able to work out, the "rule" for Russian stress is that it goes on whichever syllable strikes you as least likely to have it. (Except when a word contains that all too rarely written <>, which is always stressed.)

Greek stress is even stranger.

 

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