View previous topic | View next topic

Lead

Page 1 of 4
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next

knightmare
1037777.  Tue Nov 26, 2013 12:06 pm Reply with quote

Not the heaviest metal, and an ingredient of lead-free fuels.


Last edited by knightmare on Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:59 am; edited 1 time in total

 
chrisboote
1037817.  Tue Nov 26, 2013 2:40 pm Reply with quote

and never found in Lead pencils

 
djgordy
1037820.  Tue Nov 26, 2013 3:06 pm Reply with quote

Well....

the black substance in a pencil is called "lead" so, in this context, "lead" it is even though, chemically, it is carbon.

 
knightmare
1037957.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:06 am Reply with quote

I think Davies and Fry already addressed the lead in a pencil briefly, i.e. there's no metal called lead in a common pencil.

Search for "lead 0.013 gram", some legal limit, to find lead in lead-free fuels.

 
PDR
1037967.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:29 am Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
Well....

the black substance in a pencil is called "lead" so, in this context, "lead" it is even though, chemically, it is carbon.


Well if we were being really pedantic I suspect we would suggest that whilst the black filling of a pencil is called "the lead", the substances of which it is made are not refered to as lead - as in "the pencil lead is made of graphite". So it might be "a lead", but it is not "lead".

PDR

 
chrisboote
1037976.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:47 am Reply with quote

Lead lines do not have to have lead in the lead on the end
Although they often do

 
Alfred E Neuman
1037978.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:50 am Reply with quote

Quote:
lead
lɛd/
noun
noun: lead; symbol: Pb; plural noun: leads
1. a soft, heavy, ductile bluish-grey metal, the chemical element of atomic number 82. It has been used in roofing, plumbing, ammunition, storage batteries, radiation shields, etc., and its compounds have been used in crystal glass, as an anti-knock agent in petrol, and (formerly) in paints.
used figuratively as a symbol of something heavy.
"Joe's feet felt like lumps of lead"
2. an item or implement made of lead, in particular:.
BRIT.
sheets or strips of lead covering a roof.
BRIT.
a piece of lead-covered roof.
lead frames holding the glass of a lattice or stained-glass window.
NAUTICAL
a lump of lead suspended on a line to determine the depth of water.
3. graphite used as the part of a pencil that makes a mark.
"scrawls done with a bit of pencil lead"
4. PRINTING
a blank space between lines of print.


Given that graphite is one of the dictionary definitions of the word "lead", I'd say you can call it lead.

 
knightmare
1037986.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 9:04 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Given that graphite is one of the dictionary definitions of the word "lead", I'd say you can call it lead.


You could, but dictionaries have the strangest definitions and a different goal. Recently I checked the word "directory" in a foreign dictionary, and every Windows-home-computer-based description was technically wrong. There's lead in misleading. Nevertheless you aren't wrong, you can call it (a) lead.

 
PDR
1037990.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 9:08 am Reply with quote

I would suggest it is analogous to refering to a container as a "tin" when the item itself is actually made of steel or aluminium.

YMMV,

PDR

 
Alfred E Neuman
1037992.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 9:18 am Reply with quote

While I agree totally that there is no metal called lead in a lead pencil, I still believe that the graphite has come to be known as lead, and the dictionary merely reflects common usage. And if people use the word "lead" to describe graphite in a pencil, then that graphite is called lead. The fact that it is not the same as the element called lead is not actually relevant.

 
chrisboote
1037998.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 10:03 am Reply with quote

I think it's called 'a' lead or 'the' lead or even 'pencil' lead

 
djgordy
1038000.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 10:06 am Reply with quote

Quite. It is not entirely unknown for one word to have more than one meaning.

 
julesies
1038052.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:39 pm Reply with quote

The word plumbing comes from the Latin for lead, plumbum.

 
RLDavies
1038056.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 12:50 pm Reply with quote

This is virtually the same discussion as was on QI a few series back about "chalk" and "a chalk".

To drag in another source of potential confusion... In good old-fashioned hot-metal printing, strips of lead were used to separate lines of print (as mentioned in AE Neuman's dictionary quote above). Therefore the spacing between lines was called "leading", pronounced "ledding" since it's named after the metal.

The space between lines is still called leading, even though it's all done electronically nowadays. Given a user of desktop publishing, you can tell how familiar they are with actual printing by how they refer to the "leading" settings.

On the other hand, in journalism, a story's "lead" is the opening sentence or paragraph that contains all the basic information (who, what, when, where, how) and leads into the main body of the story which gives more detail. In the newspaper world, this was soon given the spelling "lede" so it wouldn't be confused with printer's terms like leading.

"Burying the lede" means not giving this information until the second paragraph or later. This is frowned upon in journalism, because the rule is that a reader should get all the key information from a quick skim of the first few sentences. However, burying the lede is done occasionally in sketches and feature articles that are written and read more like short stories.

Maybe there should be an episode about "Leads and Leads" (leds and leeds)?

 
knightmare
1038066.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 1:24 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
The fact that it is not the same as the element called lead is not actually relevant.


If the dictionary is right, of course. The main goal of the dictionary is to make clear what the word pencil means. Accuracy of descriptions is not a goal of a dictionary. Obviously there are more phrases and saying based on a wrong object or material, and just graphite also isn't accurate, so this meaning of lead will be right too. Has it ever really rained cats and dogs?

Traveling to the east, I think the word lead actually still occurs in their word pencil. In Dutch it's a potlood, something dipped in a lead (lood) pot, and in Deutsch it's a bleistift, a rod (stift) of lead (blei).

 

Page 1 of 4
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group