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Series K - Keeps

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djgordy
1037578.  Mon Nov 25, 2013 1:55 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Looking back at our research, I see that we didn't mean scarper in the sense of running away quickly, rather we decided that one should walk away from a cow slowly, as this isn't 'keeping still' we decided to label it 'scarper'.


Next time. do the research in the field.

("Field" - get it? Comedy genius.)

 
eggshaped
1037581.  Mon Nov 25, 2013 2:01 pm Reply with quote

Actually, I once went to Torpenhow to see if there was a hill by that name for QI - if there was such a place it would mean 'hill hill hill hill'.

During that 'field' trip I was chased by cows. True story. (not a particularly interesting story, but true nonetheless)

 
djgordy
1037590.  Mon Nov 25, 2013 2:30 pm Reply with quote

Note to self - do not exchange anecdotes with Eggshaped at parties......

 
chrisboote
1037677.  Tue Nov 26, 2013 4:29 am Reply with quote

I dunno, sounds like he could do with getting a few new ones

 
dr.bob
1037682.  Tue Nov 26, 2013 5:04 am Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
During that 'field' trip I was chased by cows. True story. (not a particularly interesting story, but true nonetheless)


Did you keep still, or scarper?

 
'yorz
1037686.  Tue Nov 26, 2013 5:22 am Reply with quote

Or milk it?

 
Alfred E Neuman
1037691.  Tue Nov 26, 2013 5:36 am Reply with quote

Or wave a sesame seed bun in a generally threatening manner?

 
Confucius
1038099.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:49 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
Now we have iPlayer and various catch up services, scheduling is a lot less relevant than it used to be.


It remains a right Royal pain in the keister for those of us who'd like to record each XL episode.

 
nitwit02
1038117.  Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:07 pm Reply with quote

Quote:

It remains a right Royal pain in the keister for those of us who'd like to record each XL episode.




Seconded.

 
Ian Dunn
1039434.  Thu Dec 05, 2013 3:12 pm Reply with quote

New DigiGuide update: it now claims that Keeps XL will be on 23rd December at 22.20 on BBC Two.

 
Confucius
1039665.  Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:08 pm Reply with quote

Ta!

 
nitwit02
1039675.  Fri Dec 06, 2013 9:08 pm Reply with quote

Ta muchly!

 
octopi
1082684.  Wed Jul 02, 2014 10:37 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
CharliesDragon wrote:
I am angry! A kilobyte is 1024, and that's just how things are! You can't just go ahead and change that!


You clearly can, because the International Electrotechnical Commission did in 1998 and even the USA has accepted the switch to a decimal kilobyte. Microsoft hasn't, and when Windows tells you how much free space you have on your drive it's counting in gibibytes (i.e. 2^30 bytes), but the other leading players have....


It is the various operating systems that are rounding the numbers down on the size of the blocks on your hard drives.

The actual physical block sizes, on the drives, are still 1024. For example, you can tell Mac OS X to calculate block size in real terms and not round via terminal. Manufacturers went over to calculating file sizes in base 10 rather than base 2 which gives you a reported size difference of 7%. So basically it's the difference between looking at the reported sizes in their various methods of calculation.

The machines, of course, will be laughing at us as they make their 1024 calculations knowing we are diddling ourselves out of those precious 24 bytes. I have switched all my Macs and Linux machines to calculate in binary.

So the real answer to the question is 1024.

 
Jenny
1082990.  Fri Jul 04, 2014 1:22 pm Reply with quote

I thought the answer to everything was 42?

Welcome to the forums, octopi :-)

 
dr.bob
1084570.  Tue Jul 15, 2014 4:28 am Reply with quote

octopi wrote:
It is the various operating systems that are rounding the numbers down on the size of the blocks on your hard drives.


Kilobytes don't just refer to hard drives, you know.

Another field in which data is measured is in telecommunications. In this field, bandwidths have always been measured in decimal format. So a bandwidth of 1KB/s will deliver precisely 1,000 bytes of data in one second.

Also, disk manufacturers were pretty slap-dash about their labelling in the old days. The old 1.44MB floppy disks actually contained 1,440KB of data. That was back when a kilobyte was 1,024 bytes. However, by classing 1,440KB as 1.44MB, you actually have a mixture of decimal and binary "kilos" in the same figure! This is the kind of silliness that led the International Electrotechnical Commission and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers to come up with an official definition of the kilobyte to remove such confusion.

 

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