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chrisboote
1026427.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:43 am Reply with quote

I agree with you on all points EXCEPT The Netherlands
I give you
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netherlands
"The Netherlands is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
and
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/nl.html *
"The larger islands of Sint Maarten and Curacao joined the Netherlands and Aruba as constituent countries forming the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
So the 'the' is lowercase and not part of the country's name

*Quite Interesting to note that CIA World Factbook has not been shut down during the current crisis

 
AlmondFacialBar
1026433.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:01 am Reply with quote

Ok, you're right, come to think of it. Though we might want to consult 'Yorz as the ultimately competent lady there.

Oh, and Turkey is feminine in German, too.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
chrisboote
1026435.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:08 am Reply with quote

Ik weet genoeg Nederlanders en bina genoeg Nederlands, so Ik niet hoef te

At which point someone who can really speak Dutch, as opposed to my bastardised Afrikaans, will correct my spelling, grammar and probably punctuation as well 8-)

 
chrisboote
1026437.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:10 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
Oh, and Turkey is feminine in German, too.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

Are you sure?
I've only ever heard people say "Türkie" (sometimes "Türkiye") never "Die Türkie"

 
AlmondFacialBar
1026438.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:11 am Reply with quote

Die Türkei, always. Native German here...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
chrisboote
1026442.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 5:41 am Reply with quote

Thank you 8-)

 
WordLover
1026445.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 6:05 am Reply with quote

The People's Democratic Republic of Korea
The People's Republic of China
The Russian Federation
The United Arab Emirates
The United Kingdom
The United States of America

chrisboote wrote:
I agree with you on all points EXCEPT The Netherlands
I give you
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netherlands
"The Netherlands is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
and
https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/nl.html *
"The larger islands of Sint Maarten and Curacao joined the Netherlands and Aruba as constituent countries forming the Kingdom of the Netherlands"
So the 'the' is lowercase and not part of the country's name
But if "the" were not part of the country's name, then the right thing to write would be

"Netherlands is a constituent country of ..."

and

"The larger islands of Sint Maarten and Curacao joined Netherlands and Aruba ..."

 
AlmondFacialBar
1026447.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 6:19 am Reply with quote

But then it would have to be THE USA and THE United Arab Emirates, too. It isn't though, because here the article only signifies the plural in the countries' name and is not a part of them.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
suze
1026525.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 11:06 am Reply with quote

We've done this topic a couple of times before, so I'll attempt to summarize. The Bahamas and The Gambia both consider the English definite article "The" as an integral part of their short form name, and require it to be capitalized. Both are countries in which English is the official language.

Two other countries are inconsistent on the use of the definite article when communicating with the outside world in English. The government of (The) Netherlands is increasingly using just Netherlands, although it also uses both the Netherlands and The Netherlands. (Nederland in Dutch - the short form name is singular and no article is used.)

English is one of the two official languages of (The) Philippines. This country is inconsistent both in English and Tagalog, seemingly unsure about articles in both (The) Philippines and (Ang) Pilipinas.

Comoros does not use a definite article in English, nor yet in French which is one of its three official languages (Comores rather than Les Comores). Swahili doesn't have a definite article (so Komori), but in Arabic the definite article is used (al Qumuri).

That's do with Arabic grammar, although I don't know Arabic and hence don't know the details. Of the countries where Arabic is an official language, about half of them use a definite article in the short form Arabic name (eg al Kuwayt) and half don't (Qatar). Note that we say Algeria in English; it ought really to be Geria to be consistent with Morocco and Libya, but it isn't.

Maldives does not use a definite article, any more than Ukraine does. Ukrainians consider the use of the definite article in English not only wrong but offensive. I don't really know why.

 
Zebra57
1026613.  Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:35 pm Reply with quote

According to Sky News the withdrawal of The Gambia from the Commonwealth has been likely for a while. The President has among his many acquired titles that of "Admiral of the Nebraska Navy and Kentucky Colonel!"

http://news.sky.com/story/1149799/commonwealth-relief-over-gambia-withdrawal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahya_Jammeh

 
gruff5
1026646.  Fri Oct 04, 2013 6:44 am Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
... Iran and Iraq are both male in German and carried the definite article in English up to a very short time ago...


Really? So it was "The Iran" and "The Iraq" until recently? I've never heard those countries said like that.

 
CB27
1026655.  Fri Oct 04, 2013 7:51 am Reply with quote

TBH, the idea of The Gambia leaving the Commonwealth is not too shocking at the moment, nor will it be for a number of countries, particularly in Africa, which might leave international bodies such as the Commonwealth.

It all boils down to money and influence.

During the cold ward of the past, poor countries needed to align themselves with an ideological body to get any kind of help, whether financial, cultural, academic, etc. After 1990 many of these countries continued to seek admission and stronger ties with "western" international bodies, as was noticed by the sudden rush of applications by former Soviet Bloc countries to the EU and other organisations.

During the old cold war, on a small scale, West Germany had an international project with a number of poor countries which seemed to completely ignore ideological affiliations, it was a purely business approach which helped German industry grow and was facilitated through academic and diplomatic ties that seemed to act as a front for what was a purely business transaction.

However, since 1990, China has taken up the mantle and aggressively pushed for these seemingly worthless diplomatic ties with many countries, supporting public projects which seemed to fizzle out, but gave them the foothold to create a fast growing trade relation with many countries they had little contact with only a few years befoer.

The Gambia is a prime example. The rise of Chinese diplomatic relations, and trade, has been phenomenal in the last few short years, and this has resulted in a country which used to rely on trade and other ties to the UK and EU for most of their economy, suddenly being in a position where sanctions from the UK and EU will not really harm them now, so they can now "stand up" to anything they disagree with.

Unfortunately, when you get corrupt leaders, what they "stand up" for is not necessarily in the country's interest, and more to help isolate their people from bodies which are critical of their leadership.

People don't realise it yet, but we've entered new cold war recently, one that is not about politics, ideology, or anything of the like, it's all about money, influence and power. It's a cold war where the people no longer matter, only the leadership.

 
Zebra57
1027189.  Sun Oct 06, 2013 8:22 pm Reply with quote

The Gambia will be a no show at Glasgow in 2014.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-24422399

 
Zebra57
1027867.  Wed Oct 09, 2013 11:11 am Reply with quote

There has been a great deal of opposition within The Gambia towards its withdrawl from the Commonwealth.

http://thepoint.gm/africa/gambia/article/hamat-bah-says-commonwealth-pull-out-not-in-gambias-interest

 
Zebra57
1126922.  Tue Mar 31, 2015 7:58 pm Reply with quote

In a recent trial of six individuals in Banjul, it is claimed by Reuters that there was a plot to replace the controversial President Jammeh with a Texas housing developer.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/03/31/us-gambia-security-trial-idUSKBN0MR2WS20150331

 

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