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Biscuit Epsiode

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retrogirl64
1017923.  Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:00 pm Reply with quote

I don't know if this has been discussed but I believe it was in the Biscuit episode that Stephen Fry mentioned that it is illegal to sell biscuits (cookies) that are labeled as "Digestives." I am US born and raised and this is not true. In multiple stores (Walmart, Country Market, Kroger's) I have come across McVities "Digestives" and they are labeled just like that. Digestives. I thought I'd take a minute to set the record straight on that.

 
suze
1017924.  Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:19 pm Reply with quote

Hmm. First of all, thanks for spotting! Show B7, for anyone who wants to find it on the transcript.

I can't at once establish what our source was for this claim. Some parts of some shows are ad libbed by Stephen, in which case the Elves can at least deny responsibility, although I'd have to say that the transcript reads as though this was scripted.

More research is called for, and will follow at some point when the hour is earlier!

 
nitwit02
1017927.  Fri Aug 23, 2013 8:16 pm Reply with quote

I always refer to them as 'suggestive' biscuits.

 
CharliesDragon
1018012.  Sat Aug 24, 2013 3:22 pm Reply with quote

Nitwit, I'm not against taking food into the bedroom, but Digestive biscuits wouldn't be my first choice... Might make things interesting, though.

I feel like the show takes every opportunity to make fun of Americans (not completely without reason, in my opinion,) but giving plainly false information for the sake of going "Haha, look at those stupid Americans!"... It annoys me. There's been other instances when they've claimed things to be American slang, but none of the American forumers here or Youtube commenters have every heard it, much less used it. It might be used a bit in a very small area of the US, but the US is so friggin' big claiming it's used all over is worse than claiming the same word is used for someone all over Europe. If they're going to claim something is an American slang they could at least try to pinpoint what state or part of the country it's used, or if that isn't possible, admit they don't know how widespread it's used.

Yeah, I get annoyed by things like that that really doesn't matter...

 
retrogirl64
1018027.  Sat Aug 24, 2013 4:28 pm Reply with quote

Like when Stephen said that Americans refer to quarters as "2 bits" or something of that sort. I have NEVER said that. I don't know anyone who refers to quarters in that manner. When he said that I thought "what?" I still think Stephen Fry is a wonderful host though.

 
nitwit02
1018044.  Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:02 pm Reply with quote

The term, 2-bits belongs to a previous generation, retrogirl.

 
suze
1018076.  Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:45 am Reply with quote

Before the US gained its independence, the main currency in use there was the Spanish dollar. Now, you've heard of Spanish dollars even if you didn't think you had. Spanish dollars were also known as pieces of eight, or in Spanish pesos de ocho. At this point you'll note that Mexico still uses pesos.

The smaller unit of the old Spanish currency was the real, and eight reales made one peso de ocho. So one real might be considered as a "piece of one" - or, if you prefer, a bit. Which is why a quarter was two bits.

At an unspecified place somewhere on the way to Bangor, Maine, trailers are available for sale or rent, and rooms are to let for fifty cents. And at that place, two hours of pushing broom buys an eight by twelve four bit room. Fifty cents, in fact.

(If anyone is tearing out their hair trying to figure out whence they recognize those lines, answer in white. Roger Miller, King of the Road.)

 
'yorz
1018078.  Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:53 am Reply with quote

Didn't need to check the whited lines.
Great Song.

 
retrogirl64
1018096.  Sun Aug 25, 2013 9:59 am Reply with quote

nitwit02 wrote:
The term, 2-bits belongs to a previous generation, retrogirl.


Ok. Thanks.

 
swot
1018119.  Sun Aug 25, 2013 2:37 pm Reply with quote

Oh, the irony...

 
CharliesDragon
1018142.  Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:40 pm Reply with quote

I was gonna call out Suze on saying people still use Pesos, but after rereading I noticed it said Mexico not Spain, as I had first thought. I guess it might be time for bed soon...

 
Bondee
1018167.  Mon Aug 26, 2013 5:45 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
The smaller unit of the old Spanish currency was the real, and eight reales made one peso de ocho. So one real might be considered as a "piece of one" - or, if you prefer, a bit. Which is why a quarter was two bits.


Would that also be the origin of the expression "two bit whore"?

 
suze
1018221.  Mon Aug 26, 2013 11:53 am Reply with quote

Yes.

In Britain there were similar expressions which used "two bob". For instance, The Sun was especially scathing about the unlamented Intertoto Cup, and always referred to it as the "Intertwobob Cup".

 
chrisboote
1018327.  Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:07 am Reply with quote

swot wrote:
Oh, the irony...

I wuz jus' thunkin' that 8-)

 
chrisboote
1018331.  Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:17 am Reply with quote

Suze
2 bob is different in that a bob was a shilling*
2 bits = 25c is odd to most minds

Proper currency is not difficult

2 farthings = one ha'penny
2 ha'pennies = one penny
2 pennies = one tuppence
3 pennies = one thru'penny bit
6 pennies, or 3 tuppences, or 2 thru'penny bits = one tanner (sixpence)**
2 tanners = one bob (or a shilling)
2 bob = one florin
2 bob and a tanner =one half crown
5 bob, or 2 half crowns = one crown (this doesn't actually exist***)
2 crowns, or 10 bob = one ten shilling note
20 shillings, or 2 ten bob notes = one pound
1 pound 1 shilling = one guinea****

Simple 8-)

Of course, we in the UK resisted moving to decimalisation for so long because it was too complicated...


*and no one accurately knows the derivation of bob=shilling

** as far as I can determine the silver sixpence was always a sixpence, the brass one was always a tanner

*** well, commemorative crowns are still frequently struck, and deemed to be worth 5, but there has not been any general circulation crown coin since 1780

**** and there hasn't been a general circulation guinea minted since the Great Recoinage of 1815

 

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