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Davies admits panel gets the questions before the recording

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colin72
1017406.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 2:20 am Reply with quote

I don't like this news. Anyone with a smart phone could get info on some of the questions/answers. Shame on you QI.

The article:
http://www.chortle.co.uk/news/2013/08/20/18509/not_qi-te_improvised

 
Posital
1017417.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 4:14 am Reply with quote

Confirmed by the others (although prolly the same source).

http://www.express.co.uk/news/showbiz/423331/QI-questions-are-too-hard-for-me-says-Alan-Davies

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/tv/news/heres-something-quite-interesting--the-contestants-on-bbc-quiz-show-know-the-questions-in-advance-8775265.html

 
CB27
1017434.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 7:12 am Reply with quote

I think people need to understand the difference between two claims.

I seem to recall that there was a claim in the past that a contestant knew the answers, but I find it very naive that anyone thinks guests aren't told in advance of some of the subjects or a selection of questions, this is normal in most comedy quiz shows, chat shows, etc.

The proof in the pudding is that anyone who's seen standup shows of some of the comedians involved in these type of shows will often hear a bit that's been used in a routine before - Jasper Carrott was probably the worst at this, he never did any interviews or shows which weren't completely lifted from his routines.

 
colin72
1017445.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 10:09 am Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
I think people need to understand the difference between two claims.

I seem to recall that there was a claim in the past that a contestant knew the answers, but I find it very naive that anyone thinks guests aren't told in advance of some of the subjects or a selection of questions, this is normal in most comedy quiz shows, chat shows, etc.


"The self-confessed ‘dunce’ of the programme contradicted Stephen Fry, who previously said Davies never got sight of the questions in advance."

"In 2010 Fry told his Twitter followers that neither Davies nor frequent panelist Rob Brydon get advance sight of the questions, but admitted ‘one regular guest’ insisted on seeing them."

Quite interesting. Quite disappointing.

 
clack
1017482.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 1:12 pm Reply with quote

Did something get lost in the translation? Do the guests receive the actual questions, or just a heads-up about what subject matter is going to be covered?

If they do get the actual questions, do they fake their ignorance, or their klaxon-evoking responses? And why are the "witty" answers of professional comedians so frequently lame? Wouldn't they have time to write a proper joke, or give one of their joke-writers a call?

Something doesn't make sense here.

 
CB27
1017506.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 4:31 pm Reply with quote

Well, consider the following set of questions, these were all the points scoring questions in a whole episode called Hodge Podge:

Quote:
Why do bankers like long haired men and short skirted women?

What starts with H and means that you’ll always be the bridesmaid and never the bride?

Who might use a left handed motorbike?

Why do you think motorbikes aren’t charged congestion fees in London?

Why would a hoplophobe be particularly nervous of a Sturmgewehr Vierundvierzig with a Krummlauf modification?

So, why did the bomb disposal expert go to the joke shop?

You can’t fit a square peg in a round hole, so how would you make a square hole with a round drill?

What is the roundest thing in the universe?

What’s made of jelly and lives forever?

How do snakes manage when their lunch is bigger than their head?

What does a judge do when he wants order in his court?

The notorious pirate Blackbeard has just given me a map, what does the "X" mark?

Does having knowledge of some, or all these questions (and possibly others that didn't make it) help the pannelists gain an advantage, or simply allow them to consider bits of their material that could fit an answer?

 
colin72
1017524.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 8:25 pm Reply with quote

clack wrote:
Did something get lost in the translation? Do the guests receive the actual questions, or just a heads-up about what subject matter is going to be covered?


It's pretty clear that Davies says they see the actual questions.

clack wrote:

If they do get the actual questions, do they fake their ignorance, or their klaxon-evoking responses? And why are the "witty" answers of professional comedians so frequently lame? Wouldn't they have time to write a proper joke, or give one of their joke-writers a call?

Something doesn't make sense here.


Getting the questions doesn't mean they have the time or ability to get all of the answers. Maybe they can dig up one or two actual answers. Maybe they find "quite interesting" information that relates to the question/subject. Also, just because they know the question doesn't mean they can always come up with something funny to say that they will later be able to work into the conversation.

 
colin72
1017525.  Tue Aug 20, 2013 8:29 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
Well, consider the following set of questions, these were all the points scoring questions in a whole episode called Hodge Podge:

Quote:
Why do bankers like long haired men and short skirted women?

What starts with H and means that you’ll always be the bridesmaid and never the bride?

Who might use a left handed motorbike?

Why do you think motorbikes aren’t charged congestion fees in London?

Why would a hoplophobe be particularly nervous of a Sturmgewehr Vierundvierzig with a Krummlauf modification?

So, why did the bomb disposal expert go to the joke shop?

You can’t fit a square peg in a round hole, so how would you make a square hole with a round drill?

What is the roundest thing in the universe?

What’s made of jelly and lives forever?

How do snakes manage when their lunch is bigger than their head?

What does a judge do when he wants order in his court?

The notorious pirate Blackbeard has just given me a map, what does the "X" mark?

Does having knowledge of some, or all these questions (and possibly others that didn't make it) help the pannelists gain an advantage, or simply allow them to consider bits of their material that could fit an answer?


I can definitely see how knowing those questions in advance would help. Some are too vague to know what it's really about but others are pretty clear. They could definitely go online and get some answers and/or related information. That information would help them
"improvise" in the moment and could help them figure out an answer as the subject is discussed.

 
djgordy
1017532.  Wed Aug 21, 2013 2:48 am Reply with quote

I wasn't aware that any of these comedy panel shows made any claim to be totally improvided, so the news that they aren't isn't really....erm...news. Next thing you know, they'll be telling us that WWE isn't a real sport.

"Q.I." isn't a quiz and the panellists, generally, are there to get the answers wrong. Actually knowing the qnswers would defeat the purpose of the programme.

"Question Time", of course, makes a big thing of the panellists not knowing the questions beforehand but they pretty much know that they are going to be asked about whatever has been the big in the news. They just have nore or less prepared answers and give them to the appropriate question.

 
colin72
1017533.  Wed Aug 21, 2013 2:59 am Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
I wasn't aware that any of these comedy panel shows made any claim to be totally improvided, so the news that they aren't isn't really....erm...news. Next thing you know, they'll be telling us that WWE isn't a real sport.


"The self-confessed ‘dunce’ of the programme contradicted Stephen Fry, who previously said Davies never got sight of the questions in advance."

"In 2010 Fry told his Twitter followers that neither Davies nor frequent panelist Rob Brydon get advance sight of the questions, but admitted ‘one regular guest’ insisted on seeing them."

 
cwickham
1017565.  Wed Aug 21, 2013 9:15 am Reply with quote

I was thinking that maybe Davies was generalising when he said "the questions in advance", and the panellists are given a general list of subjects that are likely to come up on the show.

I'm not at all surprised to hear that they're given at least some kind of information, though, because that's basically how all panel shows work.

 
clack
1017577.  Wed Aug 21, 2013 11:26 am Reply with quote

Might one of the elves clarify, please?

 
vantheman
1017627.  Thu Aug 22, 2013 1:03 am Reply with quote

clack wrote:
Might one of the elves clarify, please?


Perhaps one of them will eventually, but in the interim, I have to ask: isn't this the exact same kerfuffle which Paul Merton had to address after Lord Tebbit made his allegations about HIGNFY? Or any of the cast of Whose Line Is It, Anyway over the years? Seems to me, so far, just another attempt to gin up a little phony scandal following the "it has to be scripted!!!!| theme.

 
swot
1017694.  Thu Aug 22, 2013 8:19 am Reply with quote

There's no need to be upset that some planning goes into shows like this. It's an entertainment show, not, as has been mentioned upthread, a test of knowledge. If you just shoved people in a room, even professional comedians, and said, "Right, BE FUNNY!", the result wouldn't be all that entertaining.

F'rexample, it's taken me a few weeks to realise that the polls they have on The Last Leg are not decided upon on the spot, as Mr Hills sometimes makes them out to be. I refuse to believe that the graphics people could type the hashtags that quickly and put them on the screen. That's not a problem, they're professionals doing a job. Also, I'm sure a lot of gags occur to them when they're reading the papers etc in preparation for a news-based show.

 
mickche
1018052.  Sun Aug 25, 2013 5:50 am Reply with quote

I remember hearing somewhere that they get the questions 30 mins in advance. The same thing happens on Have I Got News for You.

But. as has been mentioned, there are two confusing claims here.
Stephen Fry's 2010 claim is someone receiving the questions the day before so that he can effectively prepare responses or gags. Qi is still a natural program, in that there is still little time to actually prepare for a program which records over 2 hours. There is another thread on this speculating who it is.

But there is obvious spontaneity, for example, Sandi Toksvig's anecdote on once accidently buying a horse in 'Inland Revenue'. The episode made its way to horses spontaneously from tax deductions, where Sandi gave the anecdote. Sandi Toksvig remains one of my favourite panellists for her interesting anecdotes.

 

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