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Long Flights

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Awitt
1013080.  Tue Jul 23, 2013 3:12 am Reply with quote

My friend's flight went from Melb-Sydney-LA.

 
Geography Guy
1013087.  Tue Jul 23, 2013 3:21 am Reply with quote

Awitt wrote:
My friend's flight went from Melb-Sydney-LA.

Is that United Airlines? That route sounds familiar.
Regardless of airline, the flight's about 12,800 km (8,000 miles), while testabb's Gatwick-Colombo is only around 9,000 km. 12,800 km is the new one to beat (or see for yourself at http://www.travelhappy.com/route_map_emission_calculator.php#).

 
Peaseblossom
1022540.  Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:15 pm Reply with quote

If I may revive this thread on a more historical note, I recently came across this gem of long flights:

'To India and back in fifteen days! Such is the latest record achievement of British Civil Aviation.'

Yes, 15 days. This was as recently as 1929, as you can read in this lovely vintage pdf from a flight magazine archive: http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1929/1929%20-%200780.html?search=imperial%20india.

I should never complain about flight delays again.

 
Geography Guy
1022547.  Mon Sep 16, 2013 3:49 pm Reply with quote

85 years later, that wouldn't even qualify as an India-Britain route: it left from Karachi, which is now in Pakistan rather than India. In fact, it wouldn't even qualify as a full plane trip - the passengers had to disembark in Genoa, Italy and take a train to Basel, Switzerland.
All up, it took 54 hours of flying time to go from Karachi to Alexandria, Egypt, to Genoa, Italy, onwards to Britain. In the 21st century, Pakistan International flies non-stop from Karachi to Heathrow 3 times every week, lasting for around 8.5 hours: 6 times faster than the original flight, and 70 times faster than the 1929 15-day journey.

 
chrisboote
1022656.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 8:22 am Reply with quote

On a note related to the thread, if not the current discussion
I recently worked out that it is not only possible to work in Cape Town for a weekly commute back to the UK, but hugely preferable to trying the same thing in NYC

While LHR-CPT may be a ~12 hour flight, it's overnight, with at most 1 hour time difference. So one boards in CPT/LHR at ~20:00, goes to bed at about midnight, waked up at ~06:00 for breakfast, then arrives in LHR/CPT at ~07:00

LHR-JFK however, involves a daytime flight stretching a day by 5-7 hours, and the return journey compresses a night by the same amount - leaving one horribly jetlagged if you tried it for a few weeks

So if only my putative CPT client could pay me enough to make it worthwhile, I would SO do that 8-)

 
PDR
1022666.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 8:39 am Reply with quote

Kathleen Turner made a radio series with BBC Radio 4 a few years ago (VI Warshawski) for which she commuted from the USA - they did it by time-shifting the british cast and crew so that Kathleen could get off the flight, do a 2-4 day recording session and then return to the colonies without ever changing her personal clock from colonial time.

We've done similar things when doing urgent trials activies involving US suppliers (ie their teams went onto GMT working hours).

PDR

 
Jenny
1022672.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 9:37 am Reply with quote

I have a friend whose son lives in Los Angeles and works in Miami. He commutes on a Monday morning and returns on a Friday afternoon. I think he's nuts.

 
Alfred E Neuman
1022711.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 10:48 am Reply with quote

chrisboote wrote:
While LHR-CPT may be a ~12 hour flight, it's overnight, with at most 1 hour time difference.


It's one hour difference in your summer, but two in your winter.

 
chrisboote
1022714.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 10:54 am Reply with quote

I thought it was zero and one hour - has it changed recently?
(Last time I was in CT was about four years ago, normally got to PE via Jo'burg)

Edited: I see from the South African Standard Time page that this is from May this year
Phew! I thought I was going senile(r)


Last edited by chrisboote on Tue Sep 17, 2013 11:01 am; edited 2 times in total

 
chrisboote
1022717.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 11:00 am Reply with quote

PDR wrote:
Kathleen Turner made a radio series with BBC Radio 4 a few years ago (VI Warshawski) for which she commuted from the USA - they did it by time-shifting the british cast and crew so that Kathleen could get off the flight, do a 2-4 day recording session and then return to the colonies without ever changing her personal clock from colonial time.

PDR


That sounds really sensible
I was about to be disparaging (along the lines of "the BBC did that?") then realised that you were talking about Radio 4 - who are to the BBC what Bavaria is to Germany

 
Alfred E Neuman
1022730.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 11:39 am Reply with quote

chrisboote wrote:
I thought it was zero and one hour - has it changed recently?
(Last time I was in CT was about four years ago, normally got to PE via Jo'burg)

Edited: I see from the South African Standard Time page that this is from May this year
Phew! I thought I was going senile(r)


I fear you may yet be going senile. It hasn't changed recently.

SAST (South African Standard Time has been GMT+2 or UTC+2 since the 1st of March 1903.

 
PDR
1022743.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 12:18 pm Reply with quote

Is that 19:03 GMT/UTC or SAST?

PDR

 
Alfred E Neuman
1022750.  Tue Sep 17, 2013 12:35 pm Reply with quote

It's all relative...

 
14-11-2014
1205711.  Thu Sep 22, 2016 10:21 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Score a point for local knowledge over believing what it says on Wikipedia!

In that case, add Amsterdam Schiphol to the list.

Wikipedia wrote:
Schiphol's name is derived from a former fortification named Fort Schiphol, which was part of the Stelling van Amsterdam defence works. Before 1852, the Haarlemmermeer polder in which the airport lies was a large lake with some shallow areas. There are multiple stories of how the place got its name. The most popular story is that in the shallow waters sudden violent storms could claim many ships. This was the main reason for reclaiming it. In English, Schiphol translates to "Ship Grave", a reference to many ships supposedly lost in the lake. When the lake was reclaimed, however, no ship wrecks were found. Another possible origin of the name is the word 'scheepshaal'. A scheepshaal is a ditch or little canal in which ships would be towed from one lake to another. A third explanation would be that the name derived from the words "scip hol". This is a low-lying area of land (hol) from where wood would be obtained to build ships.

This looks like the typical Grave Land's entertainment while struggling to be interesting, a kind of contradictio in terminis, and/or work in progress. The only story of how the on-topic place got its name is the former fortification. "The place" of the next three explanations is the off-topic fortification, but not the airport.

One can append to the Schiphol list of facts that the name of the fortification, "Fort Schiphol", is wrong, and that their Fort aan het Schiphol Wikipedia page apparently includes none of the three explanations of how "the place", (Fort aan het) Schiphol, got its name. Details...

 
Alfred E Neuman
1205729.  Fri Sep 23, 2016 4:30 am Reply with quote

Geography Guy wrote:
While Delta Airline's Johannesburg-Atlanta route only covers 8,400 miles (13,600 km), it will soon become the longest flight in terms of duration, taking up to 17 hours.


In the meanwhile, I've done that flight and I did not enjoy it.

 

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