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Loose leaves of L-interest

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Spud McLaren
1000859.  Fri May 31, 2013 5:05 am Reply with quote

Thread for miscellaneous stuff that doesn't really merit its own thread.

*******

A lachrymatory bottle contains tears - I had no idea that they were still being filled, if that's the right term, in this day and age.

 
Spud McLaren
1000870.  Fri May 31, 2013 5:34 am Reply with quote

The Leicester Longwool sheep was first brought to prominence by Robert Bakewell, an 18th-C Loughborough agriculturalist who was THE pioneer in the selective breeding of livestock.

 
Spud McLaren
1000936.  Fri May 31, 2013 8:10 am Reply with quote

The Lubyanka was originally built as the HQ of the All-Russia Insurance Co.

 
Spud McLaren
1000956.  Fri May 31, 2013 9:04 am Reply with quote

Lisbon is, apparently, the oldest city in western Europe, and has had a long and very interesting time since its founding.

An archaeological dig in the cathedral cloisters found Phoenician remains, c.1200 BC.

 
Spud McLaren
1001926.  Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:07 pm Reply with quote

Dean Karnazes, a runner who is able to perform seemingly superhuman feats due to his enhanced ability to reduce the build-up of muscular lactic acid.

 
Spud McLaren
1002135.  Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:50 pm Reply with quote

Lime, or linden, tree.

"Linden" was originally the adjective, "made from lime-wood" (equivalent to "wooden"); from the late 16th century, "linden" was also used as a noun, probably influenced by translations of German romance, as an adoption of Linden, the plural of German Linde.[3] Neither the name nor the tree is related to the citrus fruit called "lime" (Citrus aurantifolia, family Rutaceae).

- from here.

 
Spud McLaren
1002136.  Wed Jun 05, 2013 2:53 pm Reply with quote

The Lime Cycle - not a bike.

 
'yorz
1002545.  Fri Jun 07, 2013 4:50 pm Reply with quote

Lampwick = Disneyfication (barf) of Candlewick = Romeo

 
Spud McLaren
1002595.  Fri Jun 07, 2013 8:34 pm Reply with quote

So - why was the Jenny Lind Tower moved to Massachusetts?

 
Spud McLaren
1003746.  Wed Jun 12, 2013 1:32 pm Reply with quote

Luger pistol.

The Luger, apparently, isn't a Luger.

 
djgordy
1003747.  Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:13 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
Lisbon is, apparently, the oldest city in western Europe, and has had a long and very interesting time since its founding.

An archaeological dig in the cathedral cloisters found Phoenician remains, c.1200 BC.


The Lisbon earthquake of 1755 is a very important event in the history of European thought. The earthquake took place on the morning of Nov 1st, All Saints day, and almost everyone was attending mass. The churches collapsed killing thousands of people.

Prior to the quake, natural events were all explained as being part of the will of God, but when so many were killed whilst they were worshipping in church, it caused people to question this belief. The result was a change to seeing events as natural, unconnected to the work of God and was, arguably, the first step on the path to Darwinism.

It was also, it has been argued, the first major step on the path toward atheism. The earthquake caused a crisis in theodicy; the attempt to reconcile the existence of an omnipotent, omnibenevolent god with the existence of evil in the world. It was the 18th century equivalent of the 20th century question "Where was God at Auschwitz?".

Of course, there had been atheists before the quake but they were a very small minority.

 
brunel
1003751.  Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:29 pm Reply with quote

djgordy wrote:
Spud McLaren wrote:
Lisbon is, apparently, the oldest city in western Europe, and has had a long and very interesting time since its founding.

An archaeological dig in the cathedral cloisters found Phoenician remains, c.1200 BC.


The Lisbon earthquake of 1755 is a very important event in the history of European thought. The earthquake took place on the morning of Nov 1st, All Saints day, and almost everyone was attending mass. The churches collapsed killing thousands of people.

Prior to the quake, natural events were all explained as being part of the will of God, but when so many were killed whilst they were worshipping in church, it caused people to question this belief. The result was a change to seeing events as natural, unconnected to the work of God and was, arguably, the first step on the path to Darwinism.

It was also, it has been argued, the first major step on the path toward atheism. The earthquake caused a crisis in theodicy; the attempt to reconcile the existence of an omnipotent, omnibenevolent god with the existence of evil in the world. It was the 18th century equivalent of the 20th century question "Where was God at Auschwitz?".

Of course, there had been atheists before the quake but they were a very small minority.

It is also, to this day, extremely interesting for seismologists given that there is still considerable debate as to what exactly caused such a large magnitude event in the first place. The fault that may have caused that earthquake has now been identified, but the way in which that fault ruptured does not seem consistent with its normal geological history, nor does there seem to be any explanation as to why that fault formed in that location in the first place.

 
Sadurian Mike
1003755.  Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:38 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
Luger pistol.

The Luger, apparently, isn't a Luger.

The same is true of the famous MG34 and 42 'Spandau' light machine-guns, which had no connection with Spandau at all. At least Herr Luger actually designed the pistol!

Although it is inextricably linked with the Germans in the Second World War, the official pistol by then was the Walther P38, which was easier to manufacture. However, the P08 Luger was such a good pistol that most officers (and soldiers) kept hold of it.

 
djgordy
1003756.  Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:38 pm Reply with quote

Perhaps it was God attempting to convince us of his own non-existance.

 
Spud McLaren
1003765.  Wed Jun 12, 2013 3:16 pm Reply with quote

Lever

"Give me a lever and a place to stand, and I shall move the Earth" - Archimedes (paraphrased)

Pedants' corner:
If this feat were attempted in a uniform gravitational field with an acceleration equivalent to that of the Earth, the corresponding distance to the fulcrum which a human of mass 70 kg would be required to stand to balance a sphere of 1 Earth mass, with center of gravity 1m to the fulcrum, would be roughly equal to 8.51022 m*. This distance might be exemplified in astronomical terms as the approximate distance to the Circinus galaxy (roughly 3.6 times the distance to the Andromeda Galaxy) - about 9 million light years.

- Wiki

* dunno how to get the 22 up in the air.

 

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