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Korean War

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Sadurian Mike
992764.  Mon Apr 29, 2013 11:07 am Reply with quote

Fairly surprised that this one hasn't been covered already.

Much to say, far too much for a single post so I shall kick off with my favorite subject. No, not that, I mean tanks.

The Korean War saw an interesting clash between mainly late and post-WWII tanks designs. The South Korean Army and their US allies had a number of the M24 Chaffee light tanks, one of the last US tank designs to come out of the 1939-45 conflict.

The North Koreans, however, were equipped by the Russians, and used the highly effective and T-34/85 (the T-34 tank having been upgraded from the 76mm gun to a new turret housing a far better 85mm gun), as well as Russian tank destroyers like the SU-76 with a 76mm gun. The Russian designs completely outclassed the Chaffees they faced, and were a match for the late-model up-gunned Shermans (M4A3E8) which were quickly rushed to the theatre. Crew training and experience counted a lot, however, and the US Shermans managed to hold their own.

The US then committed their new heavy tank, the M26 Pershing. This had been developed and fielded during the last part of the Second World War, but had not seen any significant action. In Korea it gave the US and South Koreans a nasty shock, being markedly superior to the T-34/85. It was, however, rather heavy for the terrain it was used on, and many had problems with engines and running gear.

Although tank versus tank actions did occur in Korea, they were relatively rare. Many North Korean tanks were destroyed by airpower or infantry armed with the new improved 'bazooka'. The British tanks, Churchills and Centurions, were generally considered superior to the US Pershings but saw no tank v tank encounters.

A rather odd note on tanks in Korea. The little Japanese Type 95 Ha-Go Light Tank, a design from 1934 and obsolete by the time Japan entered the Second World War, was used in small numbers by the North Koreans. Given that the Japanese had resorted to using it as a suicide weapon by 1944, I can only imagine that the North Koreans decided that it was better than nothing! I doubt that the crews were much impressed.

 
Bondee
992811.  Mon Apr 29, 2013 2:55 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
Much to say, far too much for a single post so I shall kick off with my favorite subject.


And to think, you were speaking out against Americanisation in post 992745.
: p

 
Spud McLaren
992813.  Mon Apr 29, 2013 3:02 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
The North Koreans, however, were equipped by the Russians, and used the highly effective and T-34/85...
[...]
The US then committed their new heavy tank, the M26 Pershing. This had been developed and fielded during the last part of the Second World War, but had not seen any significant action. In Korea it gave the US and South Koreans a nasty shock, being markedly superior to the T-34/85...
(bold mine)

Is it me or you, Mike?

 
Sadurian Mike
992815.  Mon Apr 29, 2013 3:09 pm Reply with quote

Oooops. On both counts.

 
duglasbell@hotmail.co.uk
1275686.  Mon Feb 26, 2018 4:08 pm Reply with quote

Actually does any body want to know about the originalKorean War?

The US originally started taking an interest in Korea (then spelled 'Corea') in 1840 when Congress tried to establish a commercial relationship with the country but attempts got nowhere and it was soon forgotten.

But then in 1866 a ship called the General Sherman sailed towards Pyongyang hoping to trade the goods it had on board and preach the Gospel. The Koreans repeatedly told them to turn around but the captain refused to leave until he had seen the 'man in charge'.

Then the ship got stranded on a sandbank and the Koreans burned it and killed everyone on board. when rumours reached the USA they sent an expedition to discover the truth. Arriving in 1867 the Americans couldn't get an answer out of a local official and threatened to send an even bigger fleet. The next year another ship arrived and discovered that there were no survivors. the State Department offered another treaty but again the Koreans refused.

So in 1871 the Americans landed on Kanghwa-do and took the fortress, killing 3560 Koreans with the loss of only 3 Americans. The Korean government refused to bargain for the captured POWs calling them 'cowards' Realising that nothing short of an outright attack on the capital would result in a treaty and with the Koreans sending reinforcements, the Americans withdrew.

Korea would not sign a treaty with the Americans until 1882, only after Japan had forced Korea to open up 6 years earlier.

http://mentalfloss.com/article/81988/6-american-wars-you-didnt-learn-about-school

 

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